Cloud Hands

Chinese Martial Arts

 

Hsing I Ch'uan
Xing Yi Quan, Hsing-I, Xin I Quan
形意拳

Form-Mind Boxing, Mind-Will Boxing, Shape-Mind Boxing

Xin Yi Liu He Quan, Heart Mind Six Harmonies Boxing

Sun Style Xing I Quan     Online Videos     Quotations     Five Fists     Twelve Animals     Glossary

 

Research by
Michael P. Garofalo

March 15, 2008

 

 

 

 

Cloud Hands - Yun Shou

Cloud Hands Homepage

 

 

 

 

 

Hsing I Ch'uan
Xing Yi Quan, Hsing-I   
形意拳

Bibliography, Links and Resources

 


A.S.K.T. - Xing Yi Quan


Ba Gua Zhang (Pa KuaChang):  Bibliography, links, resources, quotes, and notes.  Circle walking martial arts.  By Michael P. Garofalo.


Cartmell, Tim - Shen Wu Discussion Board Topics  


Central Oregon Internal Arts Association: T'ai Chi Ch'uan, Baguazhang, Xingyiquan and Qigong.  Board Members:  Chris Matthews, Charla Quinn Ranch, and Steven Foster-Wexler.  The work in the areas of Bend, Redmond, Sisters, LaPine, and Prineville.


Chi Arts Association and Hsing Chen Internal Arts.  Master John Bracy.  Huntington Beach, CA. 


China Books: Xingyi and Bagua


Chinese Boxing: Masters and Methods
.  By Robert W. Smith.  Berkeley, CA, North Atlantic Books, 1974, 1990.  ISBN: 155643085X.  


Cloud Hands: Taijiquan and Qigong   


Combat Techniques of Taiji, Xing Yi, and Bagua: Principles and Practices of Internal Martial Arts.  By Lu Shengli.  Translated and Edited by Zhang Yun and Susan Darley.  Berkeley, California, Blue Snake Books, 2006. 369 pages.  ISBN:9583941452.  General history and principles of 3 internal arts, basic movements, basic gongfu training techniques, and a detailed description with photographs of a Sixteen-Posture form (pp. 231-356).  MGC.


Dao (Saber, Broadsword)
   


Di Guoyong on Xingyiquan, Volume I: Five Element Foundation.  By Di Guoyong (1948-).  Translated and edited by Andrea Falk.  223 pages.  Victoria, B.C., Canada, TGL Books.  Appendices.  ISBN: 0768751768.     


Di Guoyong, 1948-  


Empty Flower Xingyiquan   An online guide to the Chinese martial art of Xingyiquan "Form Mind Boxing."  By David DeVere.  Konghua Xingyiquan


11 Sword Forms Demonstration and Workshop.  Presented by Jiang Jian-ye.  Instructional VHS videotape, 120 minutes.  Tai Chi, bagua, and xingyi sword forms.  Jiang's Tai Chi Videos.  


Falk, Andrea  M.S.   Internal martial artist, wushu coach, translator, physical education teacher, bicyclist, traveler.  Saint-Sauveur-des-Monts, QC, Canada.   Email: am@thewushucentre.ca.  Xingyiquan expert, author and translator. 


Five Elements Essentials of Yue's Intention Boxing.  Translated by Jarek Szymanski.  Originally written by Li Cunyi, and revised by Dong Xiusheng. 

 

 


Five Fists, Five Forces, Five Energies (Jings), The Mother Fists of Hsing I Chuan
Five Elements (Wu Hsing)


 

Crushing or Smashing Fist (Beng Chuan)   By Jim Dees.  11Kb. 


Di Guoyong on Xingyiquan, Volume I: Five Element Foundation.  Translated and edited by Andrea Falk.  Paperback, 223 pages. 
TGL Books, Canada.   Available from ChiFlow.  


Drilling Fist (Tsuann Quan).   By Jim Dees.  7Kb. 


Five Fists of Xingiquan   Konghua Xingyiquan - Empty Flower Xingyiquan.   By Dave DeVere.  Detailed descriptions and information on each of the Five Fists. 


Henan Orthodox Xingyi Quan  By Pei Xi Rong and Li Ying'ang.   Translated by Joseph Crandall.  Pinole, CA, Smiling Tiger Martial Arts Press.  Translation of Pei Xi Rong and Li Yang'ang's classic 1949 work on Liu He Xinyi Quan.    Available from ChiFlow and Plum Flower
"Originally published by Lu Song'gao, a 13th generation lineage holder traced back to Xing Yi's founder Yue Wu Mu Wang (d. 1141), as an antidote to the poorly written, misleading, and inadequate martial arts books then available. Lu writes of his full-transmission student Pei Xirong, "He compiled and edited all the necessary points. He put his efforts into making this book the keystone, so that once grasped everything will fall into place." Here is a compendium of the essentials of not only the Henan style Xing Yi's Ten Big forms, but the essential points of Xing Yi in general.  Includes Xing Yi history and Henan lineage, 23 methods and 16 'songs' (fighting philosophy and body movement theory), the Twenty-Two Necessities (essential points of internal practice), and the routines of the Big Form: Dragon, Tiger, MonkBy, Horse, Chicken, Swallow, Sparrow hawk, Snake, Eagle and Bear."


Hsing-I: Chinese Internal Boxing.  By Robert W. Smith and Allen Pittman.  Rutland, Vermont, Charles E. Tuttle, Co., Inc., 1989.  Includes detailed descriptions with many photographs of the Five Fists of Hsing I Chuan.   


Hsing I Chuan.  Huang Chien-Liang teaches the five fists and the Sven Star Linking Form (Linking Five Elements).  Instructional VHS or DVD, 55 minutes.  Available from Wayfarer.   800-888-9119.    


Hsing I Five Force Elements.  Instructional DVD.  Sifu Mike Patterson.  50 Minutes. 


Hsing I Five Force Combinations.  Instructional DVD.  Sifu Mike Patterson.  32 Minutes. 


Pounding Fist (Pao Chuan).   By Jim Dees.


Splitting Fist (Pi Quan).   By Jim Dees.   19Kb. 


"Xingyi Mu Quan (Motherfist)." By Jiang Rong Qiao, 1930.  Translated by Joseph Crandall.  


Xing-Yi Chuan:  Basic Form and Five ElementsTaught by Jiang Jian-ye.  Beginning level Xing-yi form.  All Five Fists are carefully taught, with different speeds.  Produced by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye of the Capital District Tai Chi and Kung Fu Association of New York,  29 West Dillenbeck Drive, Albany, NY 12203.  This instructional DVD is 120 minutes long.  Website: Jiang's Tai Chi Videos.   Shifu Jiang's instructional DVDs and videotapes are usually an excellent learning tools: movements are broken down in terms of hand and foot movements, multiple repetitions at different speeds, multiple angle views, and, most important, good clear instruction in English. 


Xingyiquan: The Mother Fists.   Volumes I and II.  Instructional DVD.  By Gerald A. Sharp.   His webpage includes a useful detailed description of what is included with the two instructional DVDs.  Applications are amply demonstrated. 


 

"Wu Hsing can be called the Heart and Soul of Hsing I practice. These five seemingly simple actions are loaded with subtleties and require years of practice to perform them with total Mind/Body integration. Over the course of time they will teach the practitioner many things and can be directly related to many aspects of Five Element cosmology of traditional Chinese medicine. Pi Chuan (Metal) teaches the force of Splitting. Its power association is the axe. It corresponds to the Lung and Large Intestine meridians. Tsuan Chuan (Water) teaches the force of Drilling. Its power association is electricity. It corresponds to the Kidney and Urinary Bladder meridians. Peng Chuan (Wood) teaches the force of crushing. Its power association is the arrow. It corres ponds to the Liver and Gall Bladder meridians. Pao Chuan (Fire) teaches the force of Pounding. Its power association is the cannon. It corresponds to the Heart, Small Intestine, Pericardium and San Jiao (triple warmer) meridians. Heng Chuan (Earth) teaches the force of Crossing. Its power association is the Bullet. It corresponds to the Spleen and Stomach meridians."  
-   Mike Patterson

 

The Five Fists of Xing Yi Quan (Hsing I Chuan)
 

  Chinese Pinyin Element

     Description

Splitting Metal Like an axe chopping up and over.
Pounding Pào Fire Exploding outward like a cannon while blocking.
Drilling Zuān Water Drilling forward horizontally like a geyser.
Crossing Héng Earth Crossing across the line of attack while turning over.
Crushing Bēng Wood Arrows constantly exploding forward.

Xingyiquan - Wikipedia

 

 

 


Form and Will Boxing: Xingyiquan
.  One of the Big Three Internal Chinese Boxing Styles.  By Lin Jianhua.  Japan Publications, 1995.  ISBN: 0870409425.


Fu Style Internal Martial Arts  


Glossary of Tai Chi Chuan (Taijiquan)   By Mike Garofalo 


Glossary of Hsing I Chuan Terms 


Guo Yun Shen (1827-1903)    Biography 1, Biography 2


History: The Origins of Xing Yi Quan.  By Will Yorke.  30Kb.  A very informative article.   


Hsing I   Grandmaster Lyang Ke-Quan, Costa Mesa, California  


Hsing-I: Chinese Internal Boxing.  By Robert W. Smith and Allen Pittman.  Rutland, Vermont, Charles E. Tuttle, Co., Inc., 1989.  Index, 101 pages.  ISBN: 0804816174.  A classic work in English, one of the first.  Excellent descriptions with photographs of the Five Fists, and 12 Animals.  MGC. 


Hsing I Chuan    China Hand Kung Fu Academy  


Hsing I Chuan: Bibliography, Links, Resources, Quotes, Notes.   By Michael Garofalo. 


Hsing I Chuan.  Huang Chien-Liang teaches the five fists and the Sven Star Linking Form (Linking Five Elements).  Instructional VHS or DVD, 55 minutes.  Available from Wayfarer.   800-888-9119.    

 
Hsing I Chuan VCD Series   CMAOD  


Hsing I Chuan - Wikipedia


Hsing-I Martial Arts Institute   Information, videos, weapons, teachers, articles.  An extensive website on the subject.  Pai Hui Ke organization.  Products and information from Sifu Mike Patterson. 


Hsing I Page
  


Hsingiquan, Center for Body-Mind Harmony


Hsing I Quan   Combat Wushu - The Taikiken Pages - History  


Hsing I Quan - Wikipedia  History, facts, styles, references. 


Hsing I (Xing Yi Quan) - Shen Wu   A very informative article. 


Hsing I (Xing Yi) at the Hsing I Martial Arts Institute 


Hsing Yi Chuan  (In Spanish)


Hsing Yi Chuan - China Hand Academy  


Hsing I Chuan Glossary   


Hsing Yi, Ottowa Chinese Martial Arts  


Hsing Yi Chuan Teachers in the Northwestern United States (Central California to Vancouver, B.C) 


Hsing Yi Chuan: Theory and Applications
.  By Liang, Shou-Yu and Yang, Jwing-Ming.  Chinese Internat Martial Art.  Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts, YMAA, Yang's Martial Arts Association, 1990.  Glossary, appendix, 221 pages.  ISBN: 0940871084.  


Hsing Yi Chuan: The Twelve Animal Patterns and Their Applications.  By Liang, Shou-Yu.  Instructional VHS Videotape.  Boston, YMAA Publications, 1995.  39 minute videotape.  IBSN:  1886969310.   Compliments above book. 


Introduction to Xing I Quan.   By Gerald A. Sharp. 


Ji Long Feng


Konghua Xingyiquan   Empty Flower Xingiquan.   By Dave DeVere.  Detailed descriptions, explanations, photos, video, information.  A very complete website. 


Links - Hsing I Chuan   Empty Flower


Li Tianji's Skill of Xingyiquan   Translated by Andrea Falk.  311 pages.  400 line drawings.  Available from ChiFlow


"Master's Manual of Hsing-I Kung Fu" by John Price.  2nd Edition, 2007.  Published and distributed by www.lulu.com.  1st edition in 1977.  Translation and compilation of the teachings of Master Hsu Hong Chi.  John Price's Shen Lung Hsing-I Kung Fu website offers the book for sale:
 http://www.jlprice.clearwire.net   Redding, California. 


"A Means to An End"   by Shifu Mike Patterson


Nei Jia Quan: Internal Martial Arts Teachers of Tai Ji Quan, Xing Yi Quan and Ba Gua Zhang.  Edited by Jess O'Brien.  Berkeley, California, North Atlantic Books, 2004.  326 pages.  ISBN: 1556435061.   Description.  MGC.  Extended interviews with Tim Cartmell, Gabriel Chin, Gail Derin-Kellog, Bruce K. Frantzis, Paul Gale, Fong Ha, William Lewis, Luo De Xiu, Allen Pittman, James Wing Woo, Tony Yang, Zhao Da Yuan, and Albert Liu.  


Ottawa Chinese Martial Arts - Hsing I                         


Overview of Hsing I Chuan
   By Gerald Sharp. 


Patterson, Mike Sifu   Hsing-I Martial Arts Institute.  Sifu Patterson offers a wide variety of instructional videos on Hsing I Chuan.   He teaches in Las Vegas, Nevada. 


 
Plum Flower Press


The Power of Internal Martial Arts
: Combat Secrets of Ba Gua, Tai Chi, and Hsing-I.  By Bruce Kumar Frantzis.  North Atlantic Books, 1998.  300 pages.  ISBN: 1556432534. 


Price, John: Shen Lung Xing- Yi Kung Fu.  Redding, CA 


Saber (Dao, Broadsword)  


San Ti Shi - Three Essentials Form, Trinity Posture (Heaven, Man, Earth) is a basic Xing I Quan posture    


Sharp, Gerald A.  Chiflow.com, P.O. Box 685, So. Pasadena, CA 91031 USA; Contact us by e-mail at chiflow@earthlink.net.


Shen Lung Xing- Yi Kung Fu.   John Price, Redding, CA 


Sho Do Shin Kan: HsingIQuan   In Italian


Six Harmony 10 Animal Hsing-I Chuan.  George Xu demonstrates and teaches the forms.  Pat 1, 75 minutes, VHS videotape.  Part 2, 58 minutes, VHS videotape.   Available from Wayfarer.   800-888-9119.    

Shen Wu: Xing Yi I Quan


Staff Weapons of Taijiquan

 

 

 

Sun Lu Tang's Style of Xing Yi Quan


Cultivation and Combat: The Fighting Animals of Xing Yi Quan.  By Justin Liu.  
Justin Liu is an instructor of the Northern Shaolin style and the Sun Style Internal Boxing. 


Glossary of Sun Style Taijiquan, Xing Yi Quan, and Baguazhang  


Hsing I   Grandmaster Lyang Ke-Quan, Costa Mesa, California


Sun Lu-Tang (1861-1933)    Baguazhang, Hsingyi, and Taijiquan master, writer, and teacher.  


Sun Lu Tang's Internal Martial Arts: Baguazhang, Xingyiquan, Taijiquan, and Qigong.  Bibliography, Links, Quotes, Resources, Instructions.   


Sun Style of T'ai Chi Ch'uan: Standard Competition 73 Movements Form.  Research by Michael P. Garofalo, M.S..  Webpage: 450Kb, June 2008.  This webpage includes an introduction, information on the history of the Sun Taijiquan forms, a detailed bibliography, extensive links, references to video resources, a large collections of quotations about Sun Taijiquan, recommendations on the best media resources on the topic, and suggestions for learning the 73 competition Sun Taijiquan form.  A detailed comparative list of the names of each of the 73 movements is provided, with source references, and the movement names are given in English, Chinese, Chinese characters, French, German, and Spanish.  This webpage includes detailed descriptions of each of the 73 movements with black and white illustrations for each movement sequence along with commentary and comparisons.  Many additional nomenclature lists and section study charts in the PDF format, photographs and graphics are also provided - over 1.3 MB of information.  This webpage is the most detailed and complete document on the subject of the Sun Taijiquan Competition 73 Form available on the Internet.  This document was published by  Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Red Bluff, California, 2008.   URL: http://www.egreenway.com/taichichuan/sun73.htm.


Sun Style Baguazhang


Sun Style Hsing I - Los Angeles Kung Fu


Sun Style Taijiquan.  Bibliography, links, resources, quotes, glossary, 73 form, notes. 


Xing Yi Quan Xue: The Study of Form-Mind Boxing
.   By Sun Lu Tang.  Translated by Albert Liu.  Compiled and edited by Dan Miller.  Burbank, CA, Unique Publications, 2000.  ISBN: 0865681856.  312 pages.  Includes a biography of Sun Lu Tang (pp.1-41) by Dan Miller.  The work was encouraged and supported by Sun Jian Yun, and an interview with her is included.  Translations by Tim Cartmell, Gu Feng Mei, and Huang Guo Qi.  This original book was first published in 1915.  It was the first book ever published that integrated Chinese martial arts with Chinese philosophy and Daoist Qi cultivation theories.  The book includes many photographs of Sun Lu Tang.  MGC.  

 

           Sun Lu Tang (1861-1933)  Xing Yi Quan Xue Master

 

Yi Tao School of Chinese Fighting Arts "Yi Tao Boxing School has a very extensive Hsing-I program from a hybrid style to a direct lineage to the famous internal martial arts master Sun Lu Tang.


"Sun style Hsing I Ch'uan was developed by Sun Lu Tang, who learned the Hopei style from Guo Yun Shen. Hence, Sun Style is an out growth of the Hopei school, many consider Sun Lu Tang to be the highest level master of Hopei style Hsing I Ch'uan that has ever lived. The core of the training in Hsing I Ch'uan are the Five Elements: 1. Pi Ch'uan (splitting fist); 2. Tsun Ch'uan (drilling fist); 3. Bong Ch'uan (crushing fist); 4. Pao Ch'uan (pounding fist); 5. Heng Ch'uan (crossing fist).
Hsing I Chuan

 

"Of the three internal arts, Xing Yi is probably the most straightforward to understand in terms of practical fighting applications. Grandmaster Sun, however, believed that the most important reason to practice martial arts was the improvement of one's health; developing fighting ability was merely of secondary importance. Sun himself certainly benefited in both respects. In 1933, at the age of 73 and shortly before his death, Sun was examined by a physician and found to have the body of a 40-year old. Furthermore, throughout his life he was an awesome fighter: He worked as a professional bodyguard, taught martial arts at the Presidential Palace, and never lost a challenge match.

Certain health benefits of Xing Yi training are obvious. It is a low-impact exercise requiring little jumping, few low stances, and smooth rather than ballistic movements. As Sun notes in his book, it can be practiced by anyone, both the young and old, and the sick and infirm. Healthy people will grow stronger, while those with a disease will recover their health. However, in addition to the external physical benefits, Xing Yi practice offers a sophisticated system of internal energy training that stimulates the major energetic pathways within the body.

At the core of Sun Lu Tang's Xing Yi Quan system is the 12 animals set. This set consists of 12 lines of movements, each emulating the fighting techniques of the 12 animals that come from heaven and earth. These are the Dragon, Tiger, Monkey, Horse, Water Lizard, Chicken, Sparrow Hawk, Swallow, Snake, Tai Bird, Eagle, and Bear. Regular practice of the 12 animals set benefits the practitioner both externally and internally. Externally, one learns the physical characteristics of each animal-the explosive power of the tiger, or the strength of the bear, for example. Internally, each animal form stimulates the internal energy, or Qi, in a particular and beneficial manner. The remainder of this article describes both the energetic work and the fighting applications of four of the animal forms: the Dragon, Tiger, Eagle, and Bear."
-  Justin Liu,
 Cultivation and Combat: The Fighting Animals of Xing Yi Quan.

 

Return to Main Index

 

 

"Skill of Xingyiquan."   By Li Tanji.  Translated by Andrea Falk. 


Staff Weapons: Bibliogaphy, Links, Quotes, Resources, Notes


Swordsmanship and Taijiquan  


Teachers of Xing Yi Quan in the Northwestern United States (Central California to Vancouver, B.C) 


Teachers of Xing Yi Quan (Hsing I Chuan) in America arranged by States. 


Tehnica Xing Yi Quan.  Linia Di Guo Yong - Dragos Chiric. 


Three Essentials Form: San Ti Shi - Trinity Posture (Heaven, Man, Earth) is a basic Xing I Quan posture    


"Ten Important Theses on Hsing I Chuan"  by General Yueh Fuei. 


Tao of Yiquan: The Method of Awareness in the Martial Arts
.  Volume 2 of the Trilogy: Warriors of Stillness.  Meditative Traditions in the Chinese Martial Arts.   By Jan Diepersloot.  Walnut Creek, CA, Center for Healing and the Arts, 1999.  Index, notes, 272 pages.  MGC.  ISBN: 0964997614.  


TGL Books, Xingyiquan.  Andrea Falk, M.S.. 


Traditional Xing-Yi Staff with Applications.  Taught by Jiang Jian-ye.  This 50 posture staff form was created by Ji Long Feng at the end of the Ming Dynasty.  Produced by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye of the Capital District Tai Chi and Kung Fu Association of New York,  29 West Dillenbeck Drive, Albany, NY 12203.  This instructional VHS videotape is 120 minutes long.  Website: Jiang's Tai Chi Videos.   Available from Wayfarer.   800-888-9119. 

 

 

 



Twelve Animals, 12 Animals of Hsing I Chuan

 

Hsing I: 12 Animal Postures.  Huang Chien-Liang teaches the 12 animals forms.  Instructional VHS or DVD, 55 minutes.  Available from Wayfarer.   800-888-9119.    


Hsing I 12 Animal Sets   Instructions DVDs #1 - #6.  Sifu Mike Patterson. 


Sharp, Gerald A.  12 Animals: Hsing I Chuan.  2 videotapes. 


Xing-Yi Chuan:  12 Animals Form.  Taught by Jiang Jian-ye.  Advanced level Xing-yi forms.  There are two instructional DVDs or VHS videocassettes for these forms, each 120 minutes long.  Produced by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye of the Capital District Tai Chi and Kung Fu Association of New York,  29 West Dillenbeck Drive, Albany, NY 12203.  Website: Jiang's Tai Chi Videos.   Shifu Jiang's instructional DVDs and videotapes are usually an excellent learning tools: movements are broken down in terms of hand and foot movements, multiple repetitions at different speeds, multiple angle views, and, most important, good clear instruction in English. 

 


 

 

Untraditional Hsing_I.  By Robb Whitewood, Erle Montaigue.   England, Paladin Press, 1999.  192 pages.  ISBN: 1581600305. 


The Way of Harmony    By Howard Reid.  A guide to self-knowledge through the Arts of Tai Chi Chuan, Hsing I, Pa Kua, and Chi Kung.  London, Gaia Books Limited, 1988.  Index, 191 pages.  ISBN: 0671666320.   Instructions and illustrations of the Ba Duan Jin set can be found on pages 26 - 33.  


Wutang Physical Culture Association.   Sifu Frank Allen in New York. 


Xing Yi Boxing: VCD Media Titles from Plum Flower Press


The Xingyi Boxing Manual: Hebei Style's Five Principles and Seven Words
.  Edited by Jin Yunting.  Translated by John Groschwitz.  Berkeley, California, North Atlantic Books, 2004.  Notes, bibliography, 68 pages.   ISBN: 1556434731.   MGC. 


Xing-Yi Broadsword.  Instructional videotape by Jiang Jian-ye.  100 minutes.  Detailed instructions, repetitions, and demonstrations.   Jiang's Tai Chi Videos.   He teaches a form created by Ji Long Feng.  


Xing-Yi Chuan:  Basic Form and Five Elements
Taught by Jiang Jian-ye.  Beginning level Xing-yi form.  All Five Fists are carefully taught, with different speeds.  Produced by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye of the Capital District Tai Chi and Kung Fu Association of New York,  29 West Dillenbeck Drive, Albany, NY 12203.  This instructional DVD or VHS videotape is 120 minutes long.  Website: Jiang's Tai Chi Videos.   Shifu Jiang's instructional DVDs and videotapes are usually an excellent learning tools: movements are broken down in terms of hand and foot movements, multiple repetitions at different speeds, multiple angle views, and, most important, good clear instruction in English.   Available from Wayfarer.   800-888-9119. 


Xing-Yi Chuan:  Five Element Cascade Form. 
Taught by Jiang Jian-ye.  An intermediate level Xing-Yi form.  17 methods are taught.    Produced by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye of the Capital District Tai Chi and Kung Fu Association of New York,  29 West Dillenbeck Drive, Albany, NY 12203.  This instructional DVD or VHS videotape is 120 minutes long.  Website: Jiang's Tai Chi Videos.   Shifu Jiang's instructional DVDs and videotapes are usually an excellent learning tools: movements are broken down in terms of hand and foot movements, multiple repetitions at different speeds, multiple angle views, and, most important, good clear instruction in English.  Available from Wayfarer.   800-888-9119. 


Xing-Yi Chuan:  12 Animals Form.  Taught by Jiang Jian-ye.  Advanced level Xing-yi forms.  There are two instructional DVDs or VHS videotapes for these forms, each 120 minute long.  Produced by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye of the Capital District Tai Chi and Kung Fu Association of New York,  29 West Dillenbeck Drive, Albany, NY 12203.  Website: Jiang's Tai Chi Videos.   Shifu Jiang's instructional DVDs and videotapes are usually an excellent learning tools: movements are broken down in terms of hand and foot movements, multiple repetitions at different speeds, multiple angle views, and, most important, good clear instruction in English.  Available from Wayfarer.   800-888-9119. 


Xing-Yi Chuan: Weapons, Fan and San Shou.  Demonstrations by Jiang Jian-ye.  90 minutes.   Jiang's Tai Chi Videos.   Includes saber form.   Available from Wayfarer.   800-888-9119. 


Xingyi (HsingI) Books available at ChiFlow   


Xing Yi Lianhuan Quan (Xing Yi Connected Fist)   By Li Cunyi.  Translated by Joseph Crandall.  Pinole, CA, Smiling Tiger Martial Arts Press.  "A Xing Yi classic. Written by the famous Xing Yi master Li Cunyi or 'Single Saber Li' (1847-1921), the first high-level Xing Yi practitioner to study Ba Gua Zhang. Chapters on Linking Fist (Linking the Five Fists or Five Elements), Four Extremities and Eight Reminders (the Eight Character Secret), the two long sets of Xing Yi--Za Shi Chui and Ba Shi, and Nine Verses on the Trinity Standing Posture (San Ti Si), and detailed Xing Yi origins. If you want to study the details that make your Xing Yi Linking Form or your San Ti Si correct, correct from the inside and not merely 'correct looking', then this book is for you."
Available from Plum Flower Press


Xingyi Mu Quan: Xingyi Mother Fists.  By Jiang Rong Quiao, 1930.  Translated by Joseph Crandall.   Pinole, CA, Smiling Tiger Martial Arts Press.  109 pages.  Available from ChiFlow and Plum Flower.  "A collection of numerous Xing Yi writings from famous teachers of various Xing Yi branches. The bulk of the book contains the following: 17 Neigong Exercises (Tongzi Gong) with pictures; "Songs," Discourse, and picture sequences of the following foundational Xing Yi forms--Pi Quan, Zuan Quan, Beng Quan, Pao Quan, Heng Quan (The Five Element Fist), Mutual Creation and Destruction Form, and Linking Form (Lianhuan); lineage chart spanning four generations of Xing Yi practitioners; History of Xing Yi, both Southern and Northern.   Also includes a large collection of various short discourses on The Six Combinations, Four Extremities, "Song" of San Ti Standing Posture, Discourse on Xing Yi and Ba Gua Zhang combined as one, The Eight Necessities, The Nine Verse Song and Eight Character Song of postural alignments necessary for the application of power. Jiang occupied a high position in the Chinese Martial Arts Publishing House, and believed Xingyi Mu Quan would serve as a benchmark publication, setting the high standards that would have to be met by future publications."   


Xingyiquan (Hsing I Chuan)  Instructional DVDs from Gerald A. Sharp


Xing Yi Nei Gong: Xing Yi Health Maintenance and Internal Strength Development.  Compiled and edited by Dan Miller and Tim Cartmell.  Orange, CA, Unique Publications, 1999.  200 pages.  ISBN: 0865681740.  "Xing Yi Nei Gong  includes (1) the Sixteen Nei Gong exercises handed down by the famous Xing Yi master Wang Ji Wu (1891-1991) described in detail and shown in clear, easy-to-follow photographs of Wang Ji Wu's disciple Zhang Bao Yang (1922- ) plus historic photographs of Wang performing the same set, (2) invaluable 25+ pages chapter on Xing Yi's foundational Standing Practice (San Ti Shi), (3) Xing Yi Written Transmissions on all aspects of practice, taken from hand-copied manuscripts handed down from 3rd and 4th generation practitioners Dai Long bang and Li Neng Ran, and (4) Xing Yi Five Elements Long Spear power training exercises demonstrated by Zhang Bao Yang."    I understand that there is also an instructional videotape on these exercises featuring Tim Cartmell, but I don't know the source.   See also
Plum Flower Press  .  MGC. 


Xingiquan   Instructional DVD from ChiFlow.  Introduction, information.  "The Mother Fists"  By Gerald A. Sharp. 


Xing Yi Quan: Bibliography, Links, Resources, Quotes, Notes.   By Michael Garofalo. 


Xing Yi Quan: Books from Plum Flower Press  


Xing Yi Quan Teachers in the Northwestern United States (Central California to Vancouver, B.C) 


Xingyiquan: Theory, Applications, Fighting Tactics and Spirit
.   By Liang, Shou-yu and Yang, Jwing Ming.  Boston, Mass., YMAA Publications Center, 2002.  Index, glossary, 280 pages.  ISBN: 0940871416.  New and revised edition of the 1990 publication: Hsing Yi Chuan.  MGC.  


Xing Yi Quan Xue: The Study of Form-Mind Boxing.   By Sun Lu Tang.  Translated by Albert Liu.  Compiled and edited by Dan Miller.  Burbank, CA, Unique Publications, 2003.  ISBN: 0865681856.  312 pages.  Includes a biography of Sun Lu Tang (pp.1-41) by Dan Miller.  The work was encouraged and supported by Sun Jian Yun, and an interview with her is included.  Translations by Tim Cartmell, Gu Feng Mei, and Huang Guo Qi.  This book was originally published in 1915.  It was the first book ever published that integrated Chinese martial arts with Chinese philosophy and Daoist Qi cultivation theories.  The book includes many photographs of Sun Lu Tang.  MGC.  


Xingyiquan - Wikipedia  History, facts, styles, references. 


Xing-Yi San Shou.  Taught by Jiang Jian-ye.  Traditional 2 person drill.   Produced by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye of the Capital District Tai Chi and Kung Fu Association of New York,  29 West Dillenbeck Drive, Albany, NY 12203.  This instructional DVD or VHS videotape is 90 minutes long.  Website: Jiang's Tai Chi Videos.   Available from Wayfarer.   800-888-9119. 


Xingyi Za Shi Chui and Ba Shi Quan
   By Jiang Rong Qiao.   Translated by Joseph Crandall.  106 pages.  Available from ChiFlow


Xinyiquan and Xingyiquan.   Jarek Szymanski's Chinese Martial Arts Pages.  ChinaFromInside.   1999-2003.  Numerous informative articles. 


Yi Tao School of Chinese Fighting Arts
"Yi Tao Boxing School has a very extensive Hsing-I program from a hybrid style to a direct lineage to the famous internal martial arts master Sun Lu Tang.  Hsing-I is an internal martial art which utilizes fighting techniques demonstrated by animals and also requires an internal cultivation by which the Hsing (emotional mind) and Yi (wisdom mind) can be combined. Grandmaster Lyang Ke-Quan.         


Yueh Fuei's "Ten Important Theses on Hsing I Chuan"


Yueh Fuei's Ten Important Theses on Hsing I Chuan"


 

 

Online Videos of Xing Yi Quan   (Hsing I Chuan)



Crushing Fist with Sifu Rudy   UTube, 5:26, color.  English narration.   Cameraman talks too much. 


Eight Fists Form.   UTube, 2:47, color, music, Chinese characters.  


Liu Yun Chiao (1909 - 1992)   UTube, 4:30, B&W.   Narration in Japanese. 


Pi Chuan with Sifu Rudy   UTube, 5:00, color.  English narration.


Sun Style Xing Yi Quan Online Videos 


This is Xing Yi Quan    UTube,  8:46, B&W.  5 Fists & 12 Animals    Music, no narration.  


Xingyiquan by Feng Zheng-bao   UTube, 7:40.  Color.  Narration in Japanese. 


Xingyiquan in Summer Palace, Beijing.   UTube, 6:22, Color.   Person practicing in a park. 


Xingyiquan in Singapore (2006) Video 1 of 6.   UTube, 1 - 2 minutes each, color.   Xingyiquan competition. 
 

 

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Quotations About Hsing I Ch'uan

 

 

"Xing Yi Quan (Hsing Yi Ch'uan) is the oldest of the orthodox, internal styles of Chinese martial art (predating the creation of both Taiji Quan and Ba Gua Zhang). Xing refers to form or shape and Yi commonly refers to the mind or intent. Quan [fist] denotes a method of unarmed combat. Xing Yi Quan is commonly referred to as Form and Mind or Form and Will boxing. The name illustrates the strong emphasis placed on the motion of the body being subordinate to conscious control. The form the body takes is an external manifestation of the internal state of mind and is the underlying premise behind Xing Yi Quan as a method of combat.

The exact details of the origins of Xing Yi Quan are unknown. The creation of the Art is traditionally attributed to the famous general and patriot Yue Fei (1103-1141) of the Sung Dynasty. Being a beloved historical figure and warrior, Yue Fei is credited with the creation of several systems of martial arts. There is, however, no historical evidence to support the claim that he had anything to do with the creation of the art Xing Yi Quan. The style was originally called Xin Yi Liu He Quan [Heart Mind Six Harmonies Boxing]. The Six harmonies refer to the Three Internal Harmonies (the heart or desire harmonizes with the intent; the intent harmonizes with the Qi or vital energy; the Qi harmonizes with the physical strength), and the Three External Harmonies (the shoulders harmonize [coordinate] with the hips; the elbows harmonize with the knees; the hands harmonize with the feet). The practitioner's internal processes harmonize and coordinate the external movement, unifying the person as a whole into the most powerful state possible.

The earliest reliable historical information we have makes reference to Ji Long Feng (also known as Ji Ji Ke) of Shan Xi Province as being the first to teach the art of Xin Yi Liu He Quan. Ji Long Feng was active near the end of the Ming Dynasty (early 1600's) and was a master of spear fighting [he had the reputation of possessing "divine" skill with the spear]. He is recorded as stating, "I have protected myself in violent times with my spear. Now that we are in a time of peace and our weapons have all been destroyed, if I am unarmed and meet the unexpected how shall I defend myself? " In answer to his own question, Ji Long Feng reportedly created a style of weaponless combat based on his expertise with the spear. He referred to his art as Liu He, The Six Harmonies."
Tim Cartmell, Shen Wu, Hsing I

 

 

 

"Xingyiquan features aggressive shocking attacks and direct footwork. The linear nature of Xingyiquan hints at both the military origins and the influence of spear technique alluded to in its mythology. Despite its hard, angular appearance, cultivating "soft" internal strength or qi is essential to achieving power in Xingyiquan.

The goal of the Xingyiquan fighter is to reach the opponent quickly and drive powerfully through them in a single burst — the analogy with spear fighting is useful here. This is achieved by coordinating one's body as a single unit and the intense focusing of one's qi.

Efficiency and economy of movement are the qualities of a Xingyiquan fighter and its direct fighting philosophy advocates simultaneous attack and defense. There are few kicks except for an extremely low foot kick (which avoids the hazards of balance involved with higher kicks), and techniques are prized for their deadliness rather than aesthetic value. Xingyiquan favours a high stance called Sāntǐshì (三體式), literally "three bodies power," referring to how the stance holds the head, torso and feet along the same vertical plane. A common saying of Xingyiquan is that "the hands do not leave the heart and the elbows do not leave the ribs." Another characteristic common to many styles of XingYi is a stance called "Dragon Body". This is a forward stance similar to a bow stance with a straight line from the head to the heel of the back foot and the front foot perpendicular to the ground. This is not so much a separate stance or technique in itself as a principle of movement to provide power to techniques.

It is worth noting the use of the Santishi as the main stance and training method originated from Li Luoneng's branch of Xingyi. Early branches such as Dai family style do not use Santi as the primary stance nor as a training method."
- Xingyiquan - Wikipedia

 

 

 

"While I respect the Chinese traditions and Chinese culture for creating these arts, I prefer western scientific explanations based on anatomy, neurophysiology, and kinesiology rather than the Chinese ones, which should be thought of as pre-scientific metaphors for later rigorous and more scientific analysis.

For example, to give just one brief explanation without getting too technical, consider the neural reflex known as the reciprocal inhibition of flexor-extensor pairs. Such a pair would be the triceps and biceps muscles. This neural action speeds up the muscular response by reducing the opposing muscle's tension. When the internal arts such as Tai Chi and the others emphasize being soft and relaxed, this is one (among several) factors that if one is over-tense will be inhibited and will interfere with speed and overall agility. Although this reflex is not under voluntary control (being a spinal cord level reflex), overall muscle tension is controlled by an area of the brain known as the basal ganglia or telencephalic nuclei, a region of the brain just below the cerebral cortex. And this area of the brain does respond to voluntary control, and too heightened a state of mental anxiety, fear, and other factors can cause the basal ganglia to increase the level of muscle tension over what is optimal. This is one reason why the internal arts emphasize relaxation and not being too tense. But none of this was known until the last one hundred years."
-   Magellan

 

 

 

"While there is no way of knowing precisely its origins, most who have studied the history of xingyi attribute a significant role in its development to Chi Lung Feng (aka Chi Chi Kao, Ji-Jih Kee or Long-Feng)(11).Some say he was given Yu Fei’s book about xingyi by a wandering daoist monk at the base of Chand Nan Mountain in Shensi Province(12). While others attribute the creation of xingyi to him. Whatever his role, Chi Lung Feng’s disciples made xingyi quite popular in Shansi, Henan and Hubei provinces, and xingyi’s three major styles are named for these provinces. Just as there are different versions of xingyi’s origins, there are many versions of the English translation of xingyi. Some say it is best described as ‘mind-body boxing’. Others suggest ‘form and will boxing(13). ‘Shape of mind fist’ or ‘shape of intention’ has also been suggested(14)."
-   Hsingiquan, Center for Body-Mind Harmony

 

 

 

In Hsing-I (Xingyi/Hsingi) great emphasis is placed on holding the correct musculoskeletal structure and using the mind or intent to incorporate the body’s Qi/Chi into the practitioner’s combat movements. Due to its predominantly linear pattern of movement, Hsing-I (Xingyi/Hsingi) appears simple and direct. But it is not easy to master. Practitioners must seek to coordinate the motion of their entire body, along with their mind, into one focused action. There is nothing flashy about the style and there are few kicks. Most important is the ability to generate power with the whole body and to focus it into an explosive discharge. Often referred to as a ‘soft’ style or internal martial art, it does not appear as such at first glance. Lacking the soft flowing movements of Tai Chi (T'ai Chi/Taiji), and without the captivating twisting and circular motions of Bagua (Pa Kua, Ba Gua) its internal character is not readily evident. The health benefits of Hsing-I (Xingyi/Hsingi/Hsing I) and the practice of the five fist (5 Elements) are said to exceed even those of Tai Chi (T'ai Chi/Taiji)."
-  
Hsing I   Grandmaster Lyang Ke-Quan, Costa Mesa, California 

 

 

 

"This style has been known by many names throughout history. Xinyi Liuhe Quan is one of its oldest names; it evokes the inherent characteristics of the style:
Training in all styles of Hsing Yi focuses on the repetitive practice of single movements that are later combined into more complicated, linked forms. A familiar adage of Hisng Yi is that "the hands do not leave the (area of the) heart, and the elbows do not leave the ribs." There are kicks in the style, but the kicks are low and direct. Great emphasis is placed upon the ability to generate power with the whole body and focus it into one pulse, which is released in a sudden burst."
-   Hsing Yi, Ottowa Chinese Martial Arts    
 
 
 
 
 

"The direction of movement in Xing Yi forms is predominately linear. Practitioners walk through the forms coordinating the motions of their entire bodies into one focused now. The hands, feet and torso all arrive together and the nose, lead hand and lead foot are aligned along the same vertical axis (San Jian Xiang Jiao). The arms are held in front of the body and the practitioner lines up his or her centerline with the opponent's centerline. A familiar adage of Xing Yi Quan is that "the hands do not leave the [area of] the heart and the elbows do not leave the ribs." There are few kicks in the style and the techniques are predominately percussive in nature. Great emphasis is 'placed upon the ability to generate power with the whole body and focus it into one pulse which is released in a sudden burst.

The techniques of Xing Yi Quan are characteristically aggressive in nature and the Xin Yi Quan fighter prefers to move into the opponent with a decisive strike at the earliest opportunity. The style prizes economy of motion and the concept of simultaneous attack and defense. As the name implies, the form or shape of the movements is only a physical manifestation of one's internal state [intent]. A fundamental principle underlying all styles of Xing Yi Quan is that the mind controls and leads the movements of the body."
-  Tim Cartmell, Hsing I

 

 

 

The Five Elements

Xingyiquan uses the five classical Chinese elements to metaphorically represent five different states of combat. Also called the "Five Fists" or "Five Phases," the Five Elements are based on Taoist cosmology although the names do not literally correspond to the cosmological terms.

Xingyiquan practitioners use the Five Elements as an interpretative framework for reacting and responding to attacks. This follows the Five Element theory, a general combat formula which assumes at least three outcomes of a fight; the constructive, the neutral, and the destructive. Xingyiquan students train to react to and execute specific techniques in such a way that a desirable cycle will form based on the constructive, neutral and destructive interactions of Five Element theory. Where to aim, where to hit and with what technique—and how those motions should also work defensively—is determined by what point of which cycle they see themselves in.

Visualizing the elemental cycles can be useful. It is arguably the case that the destructive cycle consists of the easiest applications. Each of the elements has variant applications that allow it to be used to defend against all of the elements (including itself), so any set sequences are entirely arbitrary. Some schools will teach the Five Elements before the Ten Animals because they are easier and shorter to learn.

 

The Five Fists of Hsing I Chuan ( Xing Yi Quan)
 
  Chinese Pinyin Element

     Description

Splitting Pī Quan Metal Like an axe chopping up and over.
Pounding Pào Quan Fire Exploding outward like a cannon while blocking.
Drilling Zuān Quan Water Drilling forward horizontally like a geyser.
Crossing Héng Quan Earth Crossing across the line of attack while turning over.
Crushing Bēng Quan Wood Arrows constantly exploding forward.

 

It is perhaps unfortunate that the names used for the elements are also used as fundamental names for applications of energy or jìn (勁), since it can be confusing to describe the "heng jin contained within pi quan". It should be noted that the applications of energy referred to by the five element names are not the only ones, there are many others.
Xingyiquan - Wikipedia

 

 

 

"The San-t'i ("three essentials") posture, the basic Hsing-i posture, generates both the Five Fists and the Twelve Animals.  Your head should press up as if balancing a book, you elbows and shoulders should be held down, and you knees should be well bent, thus lowering you hips, forming a crease where you lower abdomen and thighs meet (the inguinal area).  You weight should be distributed so that the rear leg supports 60% of it.  You left arm should be extended, the elbow slightly bent and the fingertips at eyebrow level.  You left hand should be open and stretched to form the "tiger mouth" as it strikes forward.  Your open right hand should be held palm down, but the fingers pointed upward to protect the groin.  Finally, your eyes look at your left index finger, gazing past it, focusing on a point ahead.  ...  Your left foot is now on a line slightly to the left (about a fist's width) of your right heel.  The length of your advancing step should accord with your height." 
-  Robert K. Smith and Allen Pitman, Hsing-I: Chinese Internal Boxing, 1989, p. 34 

 

 

 

"The foundation of Xingyiquan is it's stance keeping practice called San Ti Shi (also known as San Cai) , which means "Three Body Posture" or "Trinity Posture." It is the very core of training and develops many of the qualities essential to the development of martial ability.

The "three bodies" refers to the three phases all together, i.e. heaven, earth, and the human being. It corresponds to the head, hands, and feet in Xingyiquan. These phases are again divided into three sections.

Head - The position of the head is the key to the alignment of the whole body. When standing, the head is gently lifted upwards allowing the entire body to release tension and align itself properly with gravity. The chin is slightly tucked down and in while the head is pulled back and slightly up, as if hung on a meat hook. The Eyes are level, looking straight ahead and into the distance. Sometimes the eyes will be closed. The ears "listen" behind you and to the sounds of the body. The facial muscles remain relaxed; one should not wrinkle the forehead creating tension between the eyebrows. The tongue is curved upwards, touching the roof of the mouth and thus connecting the Ren and Du meridians, allowing the circuit to complete and the qi flow smoothly."
-   Dave DeVere, 
Konghua Xingyiquan - Empty Flower Xingiquan. 

 

 

 

"The first historical evidence about this style go back to the end of Ming dynasty (1644 A.D.), when a kungfu practitioner named Ji Ji Ke (also known as Ji Long Feng), from Shan Xi Province, claimed to have found on the wall of a crumbling temple on the Zhong Nan mountain a "text" containing martial techniques deriving from the imitation of animals; Yue Fei was considered the author of this text named "Yue Wu Mu boxing illustrated manual".  Ji Ji Ke studied the manual and practised the exercises by developing the basis of a style which was later called Xing Yi Quan (heart, mind and intention boxing).  Ji Ji Ke transmitted the style to two students: Ma Xue Li and Cao Ji Wu; this last had, among the others, a student called Dai Long Bang, a rich Shan Xi merchant."
-   A.S.K.T. - Xing Yi Quan

 

 

 

"Xingyiquan features aggressive shocking attacks and direct footwork. The linear nature of Xingyiquan hints at both the military origins and the influence of spear technique alluded to in its mythology. Despite its hard, angular appearance, cultivating “soft” internal strength or qi is essential to achieving power in Xingyiquan. The goal of the Xingyiquan fighter is to reach the opponent quickly and drive powerfully through them in a single burst — the analogy with spear fighting is useful here. This is achieved by coordinating one’s body as a single unit and the intense focusing of one’s qi."
-   Xing Yi Straightsword

 

 

 

"Martial arts regard practical results as of prime importance. Since martial arts are profound and mysterious, one must always learn practically to have any achievements. The theory is merely like a compass in navigation. In this world all practical studies are (based on) becoming skillful, not on clever tricks; on practice, not deep thinking. Even if one receives transmission of the essence of holy art, one still (must) value observing the rules (methods) with focused mind, let alone the movement doctrine of Xingyiquan. It absolutely cannot be achieved by thinking. That is why practice is so advocated.

In practice there are generally two methods.  The first one is called practice in two stages. Every set of boxing (practice) is divided into two stages. In the first one one should practice softly and slowly to limber up muscles and joints, and to induce Qi and strength. In the second one one should practice with hard (power) and vigorously with speed to make full use of internal power (Nei Jin). It is suitable for applications.

The second one is called practice in three stages. In first stage one should practice softly and slowly; in the middle stage - with vigor and hard (power); in the last stage - in a smooth and balanced way. It is like writing an essay. In first section one writes an outline concentrating on main points and covering whole contents. The (literary) style is slow and soft, broad and rich. In the middle the (subject) is already amplified. Discussed in length and breadth."  
-   Five Elements Essentials of Yue's Intention Boxing.

 

 

 

"Hsing I Chuan is mainly linear, but contains zig-zag footwork and evasive body movements. The system is designed for direct continuous attack until the opponent is overcome. Blocking and deflective movements are used to attack as they defend. The system works on the centre line principle, attack and defend on the extended centre line, so that the practitioner forms a wedge with his body, sharp end in front. Everything coming into the centre I deflected or neutralized. Steps cover much ground although it may not look like it to the observer, and are single weighted. Much practice must be done to maintain the shape of the movements. The stance is upright and "suspended", like sitting on a chair. The elbows never touch the chest and the posture is semi-crouched. There are a few low kicks but the emphasis is on rooting in the ground to deliver powerful blows. In this style the front foot stamps the ground to root and provide fast powerful arm and hand movements."
-   Hsing I Chuan  

 

 

"In Hsing-I (Xingyi/Hsingi) great emphasis is placed on holding the correct musculoskeletal structure and using the mind or intent to incorporate the body’s Qi/Chi into the practitioner’s combat movements. Due to its predominantly linear pattern of movement, Hsing-I (Xingyi/Hsingi) appears simple and direct. But it is not easy to master. Practitioners must seek to coordinate the motion of their entire body, along with their mind, into one focused action. There is nothing flashy about the style and there are few kicks. Most important is the ability to generate power with the whole body and to focus it into an explosive discharge. Often referred to as a ‘soft’ style or internal martial art, it does not appear as such at first glance. Lacking the soft flowing movements of Tai Chi (T'ai Chi/Taiji), and without the captivating twisting and circular motions of Bagua (Pa Kua, Ba Gua) its internal character is not readily evident. The health benefits of Hsing-I (Xingyi/Hsingi/Hsing I) and the practice of the five fist (5 Elements) are said to exceed even those of Tai Chi (T'ai Chi/Taiji)."
-  
Yi Tao School of Chinese Fighting Arts.

 

 

 

"Hsing-I Chuan, Hsing I Ch'uan (Wade/Giles), Hsing Yi Chuan, XingYi Quan (PinYin), Shape and Intention boxing, Xingyi Liuhe quan (Heart Intention and six combinations), Yi Chuan (Intention boxing), Da Cheng Quan (Great achievement fist), Sum Yi Quan (Heart Intention).

 
Hinyi Liuhe Quan (Mind, Intention, Six Harmonies Fist) is a martial art developed in Henan Province among Chinese Moslems (Hui). This style, along with Cha Quan and Qi Shi Quan (Boxing of Seven Postures), is sometimes known as "Jiao Men Quan" ("righteous or religious boxing"). In the past, religious leaders have used their training in this martial art to protect those of the Islamic faith. As a precaution, this style was seldom publicized. For more than two centuries, its practice was limited to within the Moslem communities in Northern China. Overtime, because of its effectiveness, the style spread to the native Chinese (Han nationality). At the turn of this century, Hsing Yi fighters such as Che Yonghong and Guo Yunshen ("The Divine Crushing Fist") acquired considerable reputation due to their success in many national open martial art contests. As a result, Hsing Yi now takes its place besides Bagua, Tai Chi and Lu Hop Bai Fai - as one of the four great Internal martial arts of China. Now, the practice of Hsing Yi can be found all over the world."
-   Ottawa Chinese Martial Arts - Hsing Yi

 

 

 

"Over the last 20 years, this theory has become the most widely accepted theory in the Xin Yi/Xing Yi Quan world. History states that Ji Ji Ke (also known as Ji Long Feng) started his Martial Arts training at the age of 13. When he as 20 he went to Shaolin to study for 10 years. The story goes that Shaolin offered Ji Ji Ke a teaching position, but at the same time, many figures who were fighting against the newly instated Manchu Qing dynasty, gathered at Shaolin during their flight from the Qing armies. Ji Ji Ke was then roused by the spirit to reinstate the defeated Han Ming dynasty and committed himself to the rebel cause, thus leaving Shaolin to start his journeys around China. However, this vision of Ji Ji Ke as the patriotic rebel who invented a style to fight the oppressive Qing dynasty again might be fiction intended by his followers to romanticize Ji Ji Ke and to ensure that people took more notice of the style. Ji Ji Ke recounted the story of how he invented Xin Yi Quan in his book “The techniques of Ji Ji Ke”:

“I was going through very hard times. I had nowhere to live so I found an abandoned courtyard in the countryside and made one of the rooms habitable. At night I was often woken by the sound of an animal calling in the darkness. One night I was prepared to kill the wild animal, when I noticed a light shining from out of the other rooms in the courtyard. I climbed in through the window, and, on lighting an oil lamp, saw that the room was covered in a thick layer of dust. There was a light shining from a gap in the dust, and when I brushed it away, I found a sword and a box. I pulled the sword from its sheath, and saw that the inscription read “Yue Fei of Tang Yin”, but the sword itself did not have a name. I thus knew the owner of the sword. Inside the box I found a scroll, titled “Liu He Quan” (Six Harmonies Fists). The scroll explained the principles of the Five Elements, Yin and Yang, emptiness and form, advance and retreat, and I knew I was looking at a highly valuable description of a unique Martial Art. I practiced the art described in the scroll for 10 years, and realized that technique lies in the Six Harmonies, attack and defense lie with the 5 elements and the 10 animals (Xin Yi Quan only has 10 animals), and the movement of the mind (Xin) is called Intention (Yi) and Intention controls movement.”

Ji Ji Ke, before he went to Shaolin to study, was already proficient at Martial Arts. By the end of his stay at Shaolin he had already reached a very high level. At Shaolin he would have come into contact with various elements of Chinese philosophy, including yin and yang, the Five Elements, the Six Harmonies and so on. Shaolin also had five style of animal fist play, created by Bai Yu Feng back in the Yuan Dynasty (1280-1368 AD); Dragon, Tiger, Leopard, Snake and Crane. One the basis of his experience, Ji Ji Ke was able to create the Five Elements Fists and the 10 animals. It is also important to note here the large role Shaolin Kung Fu played in the invention of Xin Yi Quan. If you trace the origins of Xing Yi Quan back to the source, you will find yourself at Shaolin. As the saying goes “Shaolin is the home of all martial arts”.

The first recorded acknowledgement of Xin Yi Quan is seen in “A Query of to the origins of Fist styles” written by Wang Zi Cheng in 1735. “There are many styles of fist play, and the creators of them are largely unknown, but we do know that Liu He Quan originated in Shan Xi province and was taught by two members of the Ji family, Ji Long and Ji Feng, at the end of the Ming dynasty…” The author obviously made a mistake when he recorded Ji Ji Ke’s other name, Ji Long Feng, as ‘Ji Long’, but this is the first evidence in writing that ji Ji Ke created Xin Yi Quan."
-  Will Yorke,  History: The Origins of Xing Yi Quan.

 

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History of Xing Yi Quan (Hsing I Ch'uan)


1660    Ji Long Feng  (aka:  Ji Ji Ke)  (1620-1680)    Called his Xing "Liu He Quan” (Six Harmonies Fists).  
             Biography 1,

    "Hsing-I was developed by Ji Long Feng who was a martial artist known for his ability with a spear who lived near the end of the Ming dynasty and the beginning of the Qing dynasty. His love of the spear was so great that he set about to develop a system that would incorporate the theories of spear tactics in hand to hand practice. 
    During his quest, he met a hermit monk living in seclusion on Zhong Nan mountain. The monk had unusual ability, and taught Ji Long Feng a martial art known as Yueh Fei Chuan Pu. A martial art believed to be created or popularized by the folk hero Yueh Fei, a general in the Emperor's army who lived during the Song dynasty. 
    After a great deal of arduous training and deep contemplation, Ji Long Feng suddenly saw an important concept in a clear light. He discovered how to naturally connect his internal power (Nei Kung) with the outer shape of his body (Wai Hsing)."
-   Gerald A. Sharp, History of Hsing I Chuan

    "Ji revolutionized the boxing of his day and was a master of spear fighting. He laid his martial foundation by first mastering boxing at the Songshan Shaolin Temple, a mecca for the development of civilian fighting methods. As legends have it, he was at the temple one day reading a book when he spied two roosters fighting. Their fight inspired him to study their characteristics and tactics further, and from his observations he perceived the true essence of fighting and began an assidious examination of animal characteristics. He called his new method the Xinyi Liuhe Quan - "Mind and Will Boxing of the Six Conformities."
Ji Long Feng

 

 

 


 

 

 

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