Way of the Short Staff

Self-Defense Arts and Fitness Exercises Using a Short Wooden Staff
Cane, Walking Stick, Jo, Zhang, Guai Gun, Four Foot Staff, Hiking Staff
Whip Staff, 13 Hands Staff, Cudgel, Quarter Staff, Hanbo, Gun Bang
Martial Arts Ways: Jodo, Aikijo, Jojutsu, Gun Quan, Zhang Quan 
Bibliographies, Links, Resources, Guides, Media, Instructions, Forms, Lore, History

Cane     Aikido Jo     Karate Jo     Taijiquan Cane     Tai Chi Staff     Bagua Staff    Bo, Long Staff, Spear

Techniques     Quotations     Other Short Staff Arts     Lore, Legends, Magick     My Practices

Purchasing and Sizing a Staff or Cane     Walking     Fitness    Workshops     Shifu Miao Zhang Points the Way

Eight Immortals Taiji Cane     Northern Energy Taiji Cane     Shaolin Cane    Wudang Tiger Tail Staff  

Cloud Hands Website     Valley Spirit Qigong     Subject Index to Cloud Hands Webpages  

Cloud Hands Blog      Study with Mike Garofalo

    
Research by
Michael P. Garofalo


 

 

 

Cloud Hands - Yun Shou

Valley Spirit Taijiquan

 

Introduction

I began to revise and update this webpage in September, 2008.  Its purpose is to record my travels along the Way of the Short Staff.  I had already prepared a fairly comprehensive and popular webpage on Staff Weapons.  During 2013, this webpage on the short staff will be researched and expanded so as to exclusively focus on my practice and knowledge of the Way of the Short Staff.  By "short staff" I mean a straight wooden staff or cane from 30" to 50" long.

I welcome suggestions, comments and information from readers about good resources, links, books, pamphlets, videos, DVDs, VCDs, schools, workshops, events, techniques, forms, etc..  Please send your email to Mike Garofalo.  

Many "Thanks" to Master Thomas (Toma) Rosenzweig in Los Angeles for the information he sent to me on the short staff.  Thanks also to Jose Marrero and Jeff Raymer.   

In 2013, I will be learning by studying, practicing, and documenting four different aspect of the cane.  First, I will be learning and practicing the Chen Style Taijiquan Dan Dao (Broadsword) 23 Movement Form with my cane; and the Shaolin Cane by Master Ten Mancuso.  Second, with my cane, I will continue practicing the Eight Immortals Tai Chi Cane Form, Routine 1, based on the Yang Style of Taijiquan, as taught by Master Jesse Tsao; and the 32 Standard Sword Form.  Third, I will continue practicing the basic cane exercises and drills found in the instructional DVDs The Exercise System of the Cane, The Basic Foundations of the Cane, and the Intermediate Techniques and Drills for the Cane as taught by Master Mark Shuey, Sr., from Cane Masters.  Fourth, while walking, I will do a modified version of the the Magic Pearl Qigong, other modified Qigong sets, and various fitness and martial practices with my cane.  Fifth, I will continue to do research on the cane and short staff, and continue to improve this webpage.  

I use a 40" pure hickory heartwood combat cane for all my weapons practice; and, adapt other short staff, sword, and broadsword routines and techniques for practice and performances with my hooked wooden cane.  The only weapon I practice with on a daily basis is a wooden cane; and the only weapon I teach now in my Taijiquan classes is the cane.  Also, whenever I take a long walk, anywhere, I bring my cane along.     

 

 

Mike Garofalo with Cane                  

 

 

Best wishes for Good Fortune, Good Health, Peace, and Prosperity in 2014.   

Michael P. Garofalo, M.S.

Valley Spirit Taijiquan
Green Way Research, Red Bluff, California, © 2014


 

 

 

Disclaimer

Warning:  Practicing with Staff Weapons Can Be a Dangerous Activity for Adults

 

 

Short Staff Weapons
Bibliography, Links, Resources, Forms, Guides, Lessons, Media

 

    A Note to Readers:  The Cloud Hands website has been online continuously since 2001.  In 2008, over 1,900,000 webpages (excluding graphics) were served to readers around the world from the Cloud Hands website.  This short staff webpage was served to over 19,500 readers in 2010.  Since 2005, I have also provided an associated blog to point to changes and additions at the Cloud Hands website:  The Cloud Hands: Mind/Body Movement Arts Blog.  Since Cloud Hands is a very well-established and stable website, it provides readers with a good and secure starting point for their online research into Taijiquan and Qigong.  The Cloud Hands website is funded entirely by Green Way Research, with volunteer efforts by Michael P. Garofalo
    Unfortunately, as everyone knows, many other websites and webpages appear and then disappear from the Internet scene.  Authors do not pay to keep up their web hosting services, loose a "free hosting" option, change filenames, or decide to remove webpages for various reasons.  Consequently, links to some good webpages become invalid and files are no longer found on the Internet.  You may find a some of these "dead links" to nonexistent webpages cited below; and, there is no way to avoid this troublesome situation.  For this reason, when you do find a good and useful webpage, be sure to save the webpage to a folder on your hard drive or server. 
    I am inconsistent about italicizing non-English words in this webpage.  Too much italicizing makes for more difficult reading for me. 
    I welcome and encourage your suggestions for how to improve this webpage.  Your comments, ideas, contributions, and constructive criticism are encouraged.  Send your suggestions to my email box. 

 

 

  
  

Aikido Jo


 

Aikido of Manhattan, Aikido Jo Practice  2:12 Minutes Video


Aikido Jo Katas: 13, 31, 25  Video Clips   Right and front views. 


Aikido Short Staff: Way of the Short Staff


Aikido 13 Jo Kata.  Right View. 


Aikido 13 Jo Kata.   Aikido World for Beginners.


Aikido 13 Jo Kata and 31 Jo Kata Videos.  Ki Shin Tai Dojo  (Look in video clips)


Aikido 13 Jo Kata, Video clip, 16 seconds.  Wałbrzyski Klub Aikido


Aikido 31 Jo Kata.   By Stefan Stenudd.   13KB.  Photographs and brief descriptions.    


Aikido 31 Jo Kata with Awase
.  By Jonathan Diesch.   A two person kata.  


Aikido 31 Count Jo Kata and Kumi Jo.   By Jonathan Diesch.   Descriptions. 


Aikido 31 Jo Kata No Kumi (Iwama Ryu)   Saito Sensei 


Aikido 31 Jo Kata.  Demonstrated by Saito Sensei.  Narration in French.  UTube, 5:34.  Front view, side view, footwork view,


Aikido 31 Jo Kata.   Written and graphical instructions.  

 

Aikido Founder Morihei Ueshiba practicing Jo techniques with his son.


Aikido 31 Jo Kata and 13 Jo Kata Videos.  Ki Shin Tai Dojo  (Look in video clips) 


Aikido 31 Jo Kata in Four Directions.  By Sensei Stephan Stenudd.  Descriptions and b&w photos of each movement sequence, includes video clips.


Aikido 31 Jo Kata - U Tube Videos


Aikido Staff Weapons


Aikido Weapons Techniques


Aikijo - Staff Techniques in Aikido.  By Morihiro Saito of Iwama Aikido.  Instructional DVD, 45 minutes.  This video includes: 31 Jo Kata, 20 Jo Suburi, 31 Jo Kumiko, 10 Kumijo, and 13 Jo Awase. 

 

Aiki Jo, Morihiro Saito
 

Aiki Ken and Aiki Jo: The Sword and Staff of Aikido.  Instructional DVD. 


Aikido Weapons.  Instructional DVD by Patricia Guerri. 


Aikido Weapons Techniques: The Wooden Sword, Stick and Knife of Aikido.  By Phong Thong Dang and Lynn Seiser.  124 pages.  Tuttle Publishing Co., 2006.  ISBN: 0804836418. 


Alphabetical Index to the Cloud Hands: Taijiquan and Qigong  Website


Bay Marin Area Aikido 


Cloud Hands Blog 


The Correct Length for a Jo Stave


Interview with Morihiro Saito.  Aiki News #74, April 1987.  Interview by Stanley Pranin.  History of Jo. 


Jo: Art of the Japanese Short Staff.  By David Lowry and Mike Lee.  Black Belt Communications, Inc., 1987.  Eight printing, 2002.  Glossary, 191 pages.  ISBN: 0897501160. 
VSCL. 


Martial Arts Techniques for the Cane and Short Staff.  By Michael P. Garofalo.


Mastering Aikido Level 5 Bo-Jo (Wooden Staff Techniques)  Instructional DVD, 52 minutes. 


Purchasing a Jo or Cane


Saito Sensei, Morihiro Saito Sensei, 1928-2002, 9th Dan Shihan.  Head of the Iwama Dojo and keeper of the Aiki-jinja.  Saito Sensei is an Aikido grand master who trained with Morihei Ueshiba for 23 years.  Tribute and photographs.  Saito Sensei was a noted organizer of Aikido jo katas.  

 

Morihei Ueshiba Sensei and Morihiro Saito Sensei



Seitei Jodo or Zen Nihon Kendo Renmei Jodo, is a modern form of jodo created by the Japanese martial artist Shimizu Takaji and presented to the All Japan Kendo Federation in 1968. 


The Staff: Bibliography, Links, Quotes, Notes, Lessons 


Strikes with the Stick and Cane.  60 strikes are described by Tom Lang.  87Kb, PDF. 


Techniques for the Cane and Short Staff


Traditional Aikido of Santa Rosa.  Bo and Jo katas, one person and two person, are part of the training program at this dojo. "
O-Sensei, the founder of Aikido, was skillful with both sword and staff, frequently demonstrating the same movements to be effective even while empty-handed." The Bo is a stave, about 7' feet long.  A Bo Kata is a formal standardized exercise with the Bo.  Bojutsu means the techniques of using the Bo.  


Vendors, Retailers, and Manufacturers of Jos, Short Staffs, Canes, Walking Sticks   

 

Videos Online about the Aikido Jo

Aikido Jo - Google Video Search

Aikido Jo Kata, 13 Moves, 16 seconds, Wałbrzyski Klub Aikido 

Aikido 13 Jo Kata   By Sensei Francis. 

Aikido Jo Kata, 31 Moves, 33 seconds, Wałbrzyski Klub Aikido

Aikido Staff Kata #2, Richard Polichetti, 25 seconds  


 

 

Return to the Index at the Top of This Webpage

 


 

  
  

 

Cane

Walking Stick, Bo-Jutsu, Bo-Cane, Shillalah, Stick, Zhàng, Ji Pang E, Hanbo
Zhàng: a cane, staff, rod, or walking stick, Guai Gun (Hooked Cane)
Duanbang
短棒, Chang 杖, Bang
Cane, Canne, Stock, Bastón, Canna, Тросточка
canne de marche, gehender stock, bastón que camina, canna ambulante, гуляя тросточка
 

 

Advanced Techniques and Takedowns of the Cane.  Instructional DVD, 45 minutes.  Developed by Grandmaster Mark Shuey, Sr., founder of Cane Masters.  Cane Masters Instructional Video Series, Volume 4.  "Featuring the devastating power of the crook, the fourth ranking video shows a wide variety of takedowns and control techniques specifically designed for the cane, as well as defensive techniques for use against a variety of weapons."  VSCL. 


All-Round Fighting in Edwardian London: Pierre Vigny.  By Graham Noble.   


American Street Combat with Cane.  Bill Miller. 


Asian Fighting Techniques Featuring Long Staff and Cane.  Demonstration and instruction by Christopher Keith and James Bouchard.  Instructional DVD, 88 minutes, color.  Shami Production, 2006.  ASIN:  B000KJU2DG. 


Basic Foundation of the Cane.  By Grandmaster Mark Shuey, Sr., Founder of Cane Masters.  Instructional DVD.  
"As the “backbone” of our self defense techniques, this video shows all the blocks, strikes, punches, twirls, swings, etc. in the Cane Masters system demonstrated both right and left handed. If you are serious about learning how to use the cane, this video is a must!" Cane Masters Instructional Video Series, Volume 2, Blocks, Strikes, Swings, Jabs and More. 


Beginner's Guide to Using a Cane


Beifang Qi Taiji ZhangInstructional DVD, 54 Minutes, 2006.  Tai Chi Cane Kata.  Developed by James Bouchard.  "Beifang Qi Taiji Zhang means 'Northern Energy Taiji Cane.' This exciting original form was created to introduce the cane to Taiji practitioners, and to introduce Taiji principles to martial artists interested in the cane.  Beifang Qi includes sets of "Qigong" or "energy exercises", multiple views of the form and a complete section on basic applications. Each movement is named for easy reference and the DVD version includes interactive menus.  Beifang Qi Taiji Zhang is appropriate for novices, yet experienced martial artists will find new levels of understanding.  Endorsed by Cane Masters International."   Video Clip  VSCL.  Notes
This DVD also includes a warm up Qigong routine that is useful for everyone.  It will be of special interest to those who practice the Eight Section Brocade Qigong form.  There are eight movements in the Beifang Qi Qigong form: 1.  Lifting the Sky, 2. Press Earth and Sky, 3. Drawing the Bow, 4. Look Over Shoulder, 5.  Touch the Earth, 6. Bear Swims with Cane, 7. Willow Tree Stretch, and 8. Wave Away Demons. 

 


Beifang Qi Taiji Zhang (Northern Energy Taiji Cane): List of Movements, Directions and Notes by Michael P. Garofalo. 


Beginner's Guide to Using the Cane.  By Don Rearic.  12Kb. 


Black Belt Ranking Video for the Cane.  Instructional DVD, 45 minutes.  Developed by Grandmaster Mark Shuey, Sr., founder of Cane Masters.  Cane Masters Instructional Video Series, Volume 6.
 "This video contains information on the required Cane Masters Kata, cane care techniques, advanced techniques, and an interview with Grand Master Mark Shuey.  Along with the curriculum on the other five instructional videos, you will now have everything you need to learn in order to pass your Black Belt test, or to increase your knowledge of the cane."  VSCL. 


Bodhidharma's (Damo) Cane Kung Fu Demonstration.  UTube Video, 2:01 minutes. 


"Broadsword and Singlestick - with Chapters on Quarter-staff, Bayonet, Cudgel, Shillalah, Walking Stick, Umbrella and other Weapons of Self Defence; The Quarter-Staff"  By Allanson-Winn, R.G. and C. Phillipps-Wolley.  London : George Bell & Sons. 1st edition, 1898. 


Cane   In Chinese: Zhàng: a cane, staff, rod, or walking stick.  Also spelled: Zhàng. Chang, Jeung, Zoeng. 


The Cane: Ancient Weapon for Seasoned Practitioners.  By Bruce Cohen.  Kung Fu Magazine article, 3/09. 


Cane and Walking Stick Martial Arts and Exercises


The Cane as a Weapon.  By A. C. Cunningham.  Civil Engineer, U. S. Navy.  For sale by Army and Nave Register, Washington, D., C., 1912.  National Capital Press, Inc., Washington, D. C.  PDF format, 25 pages, 1.3 MB.  Mirror1

 


The Cane: Beginning and Intermediate Levels.  Cane Masters International Association.  "
This spiral bound manual touches on the warmups and stretches of the cane, in addition to beginning and intermediate levels of self defense. Over 200 pages of text and images based on the first three instructional videos. Written by Grand Canemaster Mark Shuey, Sensei Bruce Vinciguerra and Canemaster David Kelly."  VSCL. 


Cane Blocks and Strikes.    By Master Thomas (Toma) Rosenzweig


Cane and Walking Stick Books 


Cane Exercises with a Stretch Band.    By Master Thomas (Toma) Rosenzweig



Cane Fighting.  By John Vesia.  "
The cane as an effective fighting weapon is nothing new and has made appearances in a number of cultures. In Portugal, the fighting cane is called the jogo do pau. In France, savateurs train with la canne. Cannistes wear protective gear and fencing helmets in matches. A similar weapon in Japan is the jo, a wooden staff about four feet long."


The Cane for Self Defense.  Demonstration by Gordon Oster.  Instructional DVD, 80 minutes, color.  Turtle Press, 2006.  ASIN: B000H0MGLE. 


Cane Fu, Kane Fu.  Magazine and newspaper articles on teaching exercise with canes for seniors.  Article 1, Article 2, Article 3


The CaneMaster: A Self Defense Expert, Fitness Teacher, and Healer.  Information about the programs of Dave Mcneil of Goju Shorei, and Mark Shuey Sr. of Canemasters.  Hapkido Cane-Do Kai information.   


Cane Links   Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Red Bluff, California. 


Cane Masters: Basic Foundation and Street Techniques Videos.  A product review by Phil Elmore.  "The Martialist: Magazine for Those Who Fight Unfairly."


Cane Masters:  Your Source of Self-Defense and Exercise Using the Cane.  Numerous canes, instructional videotapes, and related supplies and equipment are sold.  

 

Are you interested in actualtests 640-864?  Get our self paced certkiller 000-035 and testking 642-902 study packages to pass your testking 646-206 without any difficulty in testking VCP5-DCV.

 

Cane Masters International Association (CMIA).  Board of Directors.


The Cane of Shaolin.  By Ted Mancusco. 


Cane Patch for Uniform 

 


Cane Research Project at Valley Spirit Taijiquan


Self-Defense Arts and Fitness Exercises Using a Cane, Walking Stick, or Short Wooden Staff
All documents were created by Michael P. Garofalo, M.S.
Published by Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Red Bluff, California, 2009

These documents normally include a list of the movement names in the specific cane or short staff form, and the final direction to face for each named movement sequence.  Some documents provide detailed descriptions for each of the movement sequences.  All documents include some commentary, notes, and a bibliography of books, media, and links.  Many of these documents are in Adobe PDF read/print only format.  The documentation of this research is an ongoing project of mine from 2009-2011; consequently, many documents are still very incomplete.  Over time, I intend to provide descriptions for each movement, including: 1) the martial technique used, 2) the direction of technique application, 3) the poetic name, and 4) the final leg stance.  Nearly all of these forms can be practiced with a cane or walking staff under 40" long; and some with a longer short staff up to eyebrow length.   

Development Key:  C:  Undergoing current development, current project.   F = Research completed, project finished.  L =  Develop Later, incomplete, not researched.  My current research in the Spring of 2009 is on the Shaolin Kung Fu Cane, the Eight Immortals Cane I and the Tai Chi Kung Fu Fan.  

 

Ba Gua Staff.  Created by Professor Jiang Zhou Chun, and taught by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye.  16 movements.  List of names and directions.  VSCL. 


Bodhidharma's Shaolin Cane (Damo Cane, Shaolin Damo Kung Fu Cane); as taught by Master Shi Deyang.  21 movements in 3 sections.  List of names and directions.  VSCL. 


Cane Research Project and Blog Notes from Michael Garofalo, Valley Spirit Taijiquan. 


Cloud Hands Taijiquan  Bibliographies, Instructions, Guides, and Research in Taijiquan and Qigong. 


Chen Taijiquan Broadsword Form.  As taught by Grandmaster
Chen Zenglei.  23 Postures/Movements.   Practice with cane.  List of Names.  F


Chen Shen-Pu's Taijiquan Short Staff.  Created by Grandmaster Chen Shen-Pu, and taught by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye..  74 movements.  List of Names.  F


Eight Dragons Baguazhang Cane Forms.  By Michael P. Garofalo.  Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Red Bluff, California. 
L


Eight Immortals Taijiquan Cane, Routine One, Yang Style of Taijiquan.  As taught by Master Jesse Tsao.  36 movements in 10 lessons.  List of names, directions, descriptions, bibliography, and notes. 
C  


Eight Immortals Taijiquan Cane, Routine Two, Chen Style of Taijiquan.  As taught by Master Jess Tsao.  36 movements in 10 lessons.  List of Names. 
L


How I Use Instructional DVD's to Learn Cane Forms  F


Martial Arts Techniques for the Cane and Short Staff.   Lists, notes, comments, techniques, and bibliography.  384 Kb+  
C


Northern Energy Taiji Cane (Beifang Qi Taiji Zhang).  As taught by Sensei James Bouchard.  24 movements.  List of names and descriptions. 
L


Shaolin Kung Fu Cane.  As taught by Shifu Ted Mancuso.  List of the names of the movements, directions, detailed descriptions for 16 lessons, bibliography, notes, and comments.  
C 


Standard Simplified Yang Style Sword Form.  32 movements.  Detailed descriptions and illustrations.  Practice with a cane.  F


Tchoung Ta-Tchen Walking Stick Form.   Created by Grandmaster Tchoung Ta-Tchen.  35 Movements.  List of names. 
L


Way of the Short Staff.   Comprehensive bibliography of books, media, links, and resources.  Includes research on cane, short staff, walking stick, jo, etc..  F


Way of the Staff.  Comprehensive bibliography of books, media, links, and resources.  Includes research on the staff, bo, gun, quarterstaff, pole, etc..  F


Wudang Tiger Tail Short Staff .  As taught by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye.  48 movements in this Wudang Mountain Taoist sort staff form.  List of names.  F


Yang Family Tai Chi Short Staff by Xu Minshan.  As taught by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye.  104 postures.  List of names.  F

 

 


Cane Quest.  A must visit website for cane collectors!  Fascinating information on the history and lore of canes. 


Cane Self Defense Advice.    By Master Thomas (Toma) Rosenzweig


Canes and Martial Arts Weapons


Canes and Walking Sticks Construction.   By Betty Rahbar.


Canes and Walking Sticks - Google Links 


Cane Self-Defense


Cane Self Defense UTube Videos 


Cane - Tai Chi Chuan, Taijiquan


Canes: There Not Just for Walking Anymore 


Cane - Wikipedia


CD Davis Group Self-Defense Tactical Products Including Cane 


The Cane: Weapons Arts of a Gentleman.  Instructional DVD by Emil Farkas.  55 Minutes. 


    

 


Cloud Hands Blog 


The Damo Cane. Shaolin Single Cane.  VCD instructional video.  The Damo Cane VCD for Self-Instruction.  Demonstrated and Explained by Feng Yan.  Language: Chinese and English.  Published by Henan Electronic Audio and Video Press.  ISRC CNF420100730.  The original creator of the Damo Cane was Cheng Tongshan, a well-known boxing master.   See also Shaolin Cane.


Defense Cane I.  Instructional DVD.  C Davis Group. 


Defense Cane 2.  Instructional DVD.  C Davis Group.


Don Jong: The Hapkido Cane.  By Scott Shaw. 


Dragon Head Walking Cane.  Instructional DVD by Grandmaster Wing Lam. 


Erle Montigue, Fa-Jing Stick, Yang Family Medium Stick


Erle Montique, Fa-Jing Stick Fighting


Eight Immortals Tai Chi Cane Form


The Exercise System with the Cane.  Instructional DVD, 45 minutes.  Developed by Grandmaster Mark Shuey, Sr., founder of Cane Masters.  Cane Masters Instructional Video Series, Volume 1: Isometric, Stretching, Resistance, Basic Techniques.
 "The material in this video is based solely on the physical fitness aspects of using the cane either with our without a resistance band. You will see not only the proper technique of performing each exercise, but also a graphic representation of that portion of the body being stressed.  We have had many doctors, chiropractors, and physical therapists report that they have patients who have benefited greatly from this program."  VSCL. 


Evolution of Club to Staff


The Fighting Cane: Armed, Elegant and Invisible.  By Ted Truscott.  13Kb. 


French Cane Fencing 


Goju-Shorei Weapons System.  By Master Dave McNeil.  Cane system. A detailed textbook (288 pages). videos, canes and other products are offered for sale.  Goju-Shorei is a three weapons system: cane, knife, and fan. 


Goju-Shorei Weapons System, Video 1, Yellow and Orange Ranks.  Katas and techniques.  This is the foundation tape for all the other ranks.  Instructional
VHS, 41 minutes.   


Goju-Shorei Weapons System, Video 2.  Purple and Green Ranks.  Instructional VHS, 40 minutes.  With the Progressive Strike Zones, the student will add cane to cane contact to the learning process. 
Two katas and 20 techniques round out this videotape."  


Hapkido Cane: Big Stick Fighting from the Dojo to the Street.  Instructional DVD by Alain Burrese.  150 minutes. 


Hapkido Cane-Do Kai.  A martial art developed by Joe Robaina


History of the Korean Cane (Ji Pang E).  By Master James Benko.  10Kb. 


How to Walk Safely with a Cane.  By Sifu John Chow. 


Hsing I Cane Form by Master Huang Su Chun  UTube Demonstrations.  List of movement name in English and Chinese from Poetry in Motion Tai Chi Chuan website by Jeff Raymer. 


Index to the Cloud Hands Website   A detailed, alphabetically arranged, subject index to webpages and documents offered at the Cloud Hands Website.


Intermediate Techniques and Drills for the Cane.  Instructional DVD, 45 minutes.  Developed by Grandmaster Mark Shuey, Sr., founder of Cane Masters.  Cane Masters Instructional Video Series, Volume 3, Intermediate Techniques and Defensive Drills.  "
This video utilizes the elements shown in the “Basic Foundation” tape and combines them into easy to follow techniques to ward off attacks by a single opponent. 45 minutes long, the video is complete with practice drills for fighting and self-defense with a partner."  VSCL. 


Martial Arts Techniques for the Cane and Short Staff.  By Michael P. Garofalo.  


Martial Cane Concepts.  By Michael Janich.  A Realistic System of Walking Stick Self Defense.  Instructional DVD, 70 minutes.  Paladin Press, 805966056937.  


Master the Cane.  Featuring  Grandmaster Ted Gambordella.  Instructional DVD,


Mastering the Cane.  Featuring Ted Tabura.  Instructional DVD. 


Personal Self-Defense with a Walking Cane


Purchasing a Cane or Walking Stick


Raising Cane: The Unexpected Martial Art.  By Octavio Ramos.   Velluminous Press, 2006.  188 pages.  ISBN: 1905605102.   This book features fairly detailed explanations with illustrations of many cane strikes, blocks, and maneuvers by a former sheriff. 
Black and white photographs and descriptions of all cane techniques.VSCL. 


The Return of the Cane: A Natural History of the Walking Stick.  By Gerard J. Van Den Broek.  International Books, 2007.  120 pages.  ISBN: 9057270501.  "Much more than a study of walking sticks as antiques and collectibles, this fascinating book also explores the myths and symbols associated with sticks and canes. Noting that apes use sticks as tools, to humans the stick is also a form of power. Batons, clubs, dueling sticks, scepters, staffs, and magic wands are cited and discussed showing the ancient association of sticks with authority, piety, strength, wisdom, and the supernatural; a chapter is devoted to famous canes in history and literature; and photographs and illustrations throughout present canes of various woods, decoration, and rarity."  VSCL. 


Self-Defense with a Cane.  By E. W. Barton-Wright, 1901. 


Self-Defense with a Cane, Part 2.  By E. W. Barton-Wright, 1901. 


Self-Defense: Cane 1.  Instructional DVD.  Cane workshop by Charles Davis. 


Shifu Zhang's Mysterious Cane 


Shaolin Cane: Bibliography, Links, Resources




The Shaolin Cane: The Wooden Weapon of Kung Fu.  Instruction by Ted Mancuso.  Instructional DVD, 60 minutes.  Plum Publications, Santa Cruz, California, © 2005.  "In this presentation by Ted Mancuso, he utilizes a traditional Shaolin cane set taught to him by one of his teachers, Lam Kwong Wing, to explore the very nature of weapons work. Introductory remarks bring new points to light about the usefulness of weapons work especially, with simple, easily available instruments. Among the topics covered, Mr. Mancuso discusses and demonstrates:  Basic strikes and their applicability to all weapons.  Grips and the "flexible hand" concept.  The traditional Northern Shaolin Boxing Cane form.  In-depth stepwise breakdowns of each section of this fast and mobile form.  Examples of applications, including running commentary explaining more than just the movements but the reasoning behind cane defenses.  According to this teacher, "Over the years students have come to me and say, - I'd like to learn the cane from you. When I ask why they always say something like, - For my father. He's getting old. At that point I have to explain to them that this is one of the most dynamic weapons sets in the entire Shaolin arsenal. After all, if you think about it handing a simple stick to a Kung Fu artists who can do sword, spear, whip and dagger is just like saying "anything goes." This is definitely not your grandfather's cane form."  In this instructional DVD, the lineage of this particular Shaolin Cane form is given as:  Ted Mancuso was taught by Lam Kwong Wing,  who was taught by Yim Shang Mo, who was taught by Gu Ru Shang,  who was taught by Yan Gi Wen, who was taught by Yan Di Gong, who was taught by Wang Bang Cai, who was taught by Gan Feng Chi, who was taught by Monk Zhao Yuan He Shang.  Read the short essay by Ted Mancuso on The Shaolin Cane.   VSCL.   

 


Shuey, Mark Sr.  Karate Master and Cane Grand Master.  Biography 1, Biography 2.   Founder of Canemasters.  President of Cane Masters International Association (CMIA).  Interview by WMA. 
 

    

Mark Shuey Sr.
Cane Grandmaster


The Staff: Bibliography, Links, Quotes, Notes, Lessons


The Stick and Cane in Close Combat.  By Tom Lang.   Unique Publications.  ISBN: 0865682577. 
"The result of a 7 year intensive study of grappling techniques with the stick and cane, the book presents more than 120 jointlocks, takedowns, chokes, holds, disarms, surprise attacks, rolls, strikes, and exercises with the stick and cane in 750 photographs. These techniques were collected and refined from those described in more than 120 books and videos on the topic as practiced in several traditions, as well as from my 35+ years of experience in the martial arts.  It is the largest collection of these techniques yet published.


Stick Fighting 


Street Techniques of the Cane.  Instructional DVD, 45 minutes.  Developed by Grandmaster Mark Shuey, Sr., founder of Cane Masters.  Cane Masters Instructional Video Series, Volume 4. 
"We have combined a variety of blocks and counters introduced in our other instructional videos into a series of techniques designed for self-defense in a true street situation. GM Shuey and his son will show you some great “down and dirty” tactics against a number of different attacks."


Strikes with the Stick and Cane.  60 strikes are described by Tom Lang.  87Kb, PDF. 


Tai Chi Chuan, Taijiquan - Cane, Short Staff


Tai Chi Partner Cane From (San Tsai Tuan Kun).  By Sifu Michael Gilman and Stephani Morel, Port Townsend, Washington.  Detailed instructions with b&w photographs online.  An instructional videotape is also available for Sifu Gilman, and available online.  "This is a useful, short (11 movements per side) partner form. When the transition is added, one ends up with a beautiful, instructive partner or solo form. These lessons are divided into sections. The first is the Introduction and all the applications for the form. The second and third sections break down each of the two sides and teach the movements. The last section shows the   form performed as a partner form. Keep in mind that there is a companion VHS video tape available through the on-line store."  Tai Chi Partner Cane (San Tsai Tuan Kun).  Three Powers Stick, Short Stick practices.  There are videos on UTube for each lesson:  Lesson One 8:32, Lesson Two: 9:15, Lesson Three, 8:27, Lesson Four, 9:11, Lesson Five, 8:55, Lesson Six, 9:24, Lesson Seven, 6:04. 


Taiji Zhang: Japanese, Chinese, and Okinawan Styles.  Instructional DVD, 2006.  By Christopher Keith and James Bouchard. 


Tchoung Ta-Tchen Walking Stick Form.  35 movements.  A lively taijiquan walking stick or cane form


Techniques for the Cane and Short Staff.  By Michael P. Garofalo, M.S., Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Red Bluff, California.  January 2009.  100Kb. 
Includes Strikes - Two Hands, Strikes - One Hand, Blocks - Two Hands, Blocks - One Hand, Sweeps, Pull Downs, Chops, Jabs, Pokes, Punches.  The document provides a bibliography, links, and resources.  The document includes brief descriptions for each short staff and/or cane technique. 


Thunder Stick Form developed by Chen Pan-Ling and as taught by Chen Yun-Ching.


Traditional Tai Chi Eight Immortals Cane, Routine One.  Demonstrated by Master Jesse Tsao.  Routine One is based on the Yang Style of Taijiquan.  Instructional DVD, 64 minutes.  Produced by Tai Chi Healthways, San Diego, 2008.  Master Tsao developed this cane form himself, with grandmaster Zhu Tiancai's support. 


Traditional Tai Chi Eight Immortals Cane, Routine One.  These lists and detailed descriptions of each movement are for the use of students at the Valley Spirit Taijiquan Center in Red Bluff, California.  Routine One is based on the Yang Style of Taijiquan, and we teach the Yang Style of T'ai Chi Ch'uan at the Valley Spirit Taijiquan Center.  This tai chi cane form is taught on an instructional DVD by Master Jesse Tsao.  Master Tsao developed this cane form himself, with grandmaster Zhu Tiancai's support.  All students studying this Tai Chi Cane form should purchase this very good instructional DVD from Master Jesse Tsao for their home study. 

  A.   List of Movements, List of Lessons, and References for Routine One, (PDF Format, 27Kb, 4 pages).
  B.   List of Movements, and Lesson List for Routine One (PDF Format, 18Kb, 1 page).
  C.   Lesson 1: Descriptions of the movements in Routine One, Movements 1-4 (PDF format, 33 Kb, 4 pages). 
  D.   Lesson 2: Descriptions of the movements in Routine One, Movements 5-9 (PDF format, 35 Kb, 4 pages). 


Traditional Tai Chi Eight Immortals Cane, Routine Two (Cannon Cane).  Demonstrated by Master Jesse Tsao.  Routine Two, Cannon Cane, is based on the Chen Style of Taijiquan.  Instructional DVD, 65 minutes.  Produced by Tai Chi Healthways, San Diego, 2008.  Master Tsao developed this cane form himself, with grandmaster Zhu Tiancai's support. 


Training with Canes Discussion 


Valley Spirit Center Library Collection = VSCL, Red Bluff, California. 


Valley Spirit Taijiquan Cane Links 


Vendors, Retailers, and Manufacturers of Canes, Walking Sticks, Short Staffs      


Videos on U Tube:  Tai Chi Cane, Taijiquan Cane, Hapkido Cane 


VSCL = Valley Spirit Center Library Collection, Red Bluff, California. 


Walkiing Cane Information: History, Facts, and Usage of Canes 


Walking Canes and Sticks:  Where Fashion Meets Function  


Walking Stick and Cane Books


The Walking Stick Method of Self-Defense.  By H. G. Lang, 1923.  Published by Kirk Lawson.  118 pages. 


The Walking Stick Method of Self-Defense.  By Officer.  Published by Palladin Press, 2004.  96 pages.  ISBN: 1581604386. 


Walking Stick - Wikipedia


"Wang Shu-Chin's T'ai Chi Walking Stick," By Manfred Erich Rottmann, T'ai Chi International Magazine of T'ai Chi Ch'uan, Vol. 18, No. 6, December, 1994, pp. 26-29.  Wang Shu-Chin (1904-1981).  According to Marnix Wells, Chen Pan-ling taught Wang Shu Chin the 24 movement walking stick form.  


Way of the Short Staff.  By Michael P. Garofalo, M.S.  A comprehensive guide to the practice of the short staff, cane, jo, walking stick, gun, zhang, whip staff, 13 Hands Staff, and related wood short staff weapons.  A detailed and annotated guide, bibliography, lists of links, resources, instructional media, online videos, and lessons.   Includes use of the short staff and cane in martial arts, self-defense, walking and hiking.  Separate sections on Aikido Jo, Cane, Taijiquan cane and staff, Jodo, exercises with a short staff, selected quotations, techniques, selecting and purchasing a short staff, tips and suggestions, and a long section on the lore, legends, and magick of the short staff.  Includes "Shifu Miao Zhang Points the Way."  Published by Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Red Bluff, California.  Updated on a regular basis since October, 2008.  Filesize: 335+ Kb.  Related to Mike's popular webpage on the Staff.


The Ways of Walking: Quotes, Poems, Sayings, and Lore


Winning Katas of the Cane.  Instructional DVD, 51 minutes.  Developed by Grandmaster Mark Shuey, Sr., founder of Cane Masters.  Cane Masters Instructional Video Series, Volume 5, Winning Katas with Techniques.
 "Mark Shuey Sr. shares his advanced techniques and winning katas with you in this 51 minute tape. These are the same katas he used to win 50 first places, 6 Grand Championships, and the World and National Titles in 1998 and 1999! This fifth video in the ranking series will help you put the finishing touches on your journey to becoming a Canemaster."  VSCL. 


Workshops, Seminars, Lectures, Demonstrations on the Cane, Walking Stick, Jo, Short Staff

 

Disclaimer

Warning:  Practicing with Staff Weapons Can Be a Dangerous Activity for Adults

 


Videos Online about the Cane

Cane Masters 

Cane Weapons on UTube 

Ji Pan Gi Hyung (Cane Form)  6:01

Three Powers Cane Form, Michael Gilman, Lesson One

 

Cane Notes and Information

 

"So what are the areas that a "CaneMaster" excels in? All Master level cane practitioners excel in cane self defense, teaching ability, exercising with the cane and natural healing. By taking a look at three of the pioneers of the art of the cane and the way in which they present their art, we find the commonalities that define the masters. GM Dave Mcneil of Goju Shorei has made the isometric cane exercises and stretches an integral part of conditioning for the cane in his system. He has also incorporated "seikufujutsu" a type of Japanese restorative massage as part of his advanced dan requirement. Of course, the self defense tecniques and kata are the foundation of the system. GCM Shuey of the CMIA, in addition to the self defense techniques and kata incorporates cane isometrics, stretches, cane exercise bands for resistance training and has entered the physical rehabilitation arena with his unique cane exercise system to the point where some medical insurance companies have offered reimbursement for his programs. GCM Shuey has brought the cane to the general public beyond its self defense and fitness context. Anyone who uses the cane as a medical aid can now turn it into a valuable equalizer. CM Robaina of the Cane-Do Kai likewise presents the cane as a complete martial art that offers self -defense, personal fitness and natural healing. Robaina who owns the Cane Masters Cane-Do Kai dojo in Miami, actually has a personal fitness and healing practice revolving around the cane. Robaina integrates cane stretches, isometrics, exercise bands and a yoga-pilates like cane exercise system. He also developed the "Quantum Cane" energy healing technique that he currently teaches to lay people as well as licensed health care professionals. CM Robaina holds the credentials to bring this system to the public since he is a degreed exercise physiologist, Master of Sports Science, certifed Specialist in Performance Nutrition, Licensed Massage Therapist, and Board Certified Doctor of Naturopathy. So based on the approach of three of the premiere cane exponents today we can agree that a CaneMaster is a teacher of self protection, personal exercise, healing, and recuperative technques. A valuable contributor of good to society."
The CaneMaster: A Self Defense Expert, Fitness Teacher, and Healer.

 

 

 

Return to the Index at the Top of This Webpage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  
  

 

Karate Jo, Jo Do
Shindo Muso Ryu, Kendo, Arnis, Escrima

 

Aikido and Jo 


Advanced Stick Fighting.  By Masaaki Hatsumi.  Tokyo, Japan, Kodansha International, 2005.  208 pages.  Translated by Bruce Appleby and Doug Wilson.  ISBN: 4770029969.  VSCL.  Mostly a book of black and white photographs of Masaaki Hatsumi. 


Arnis - Wikipedia   This Filipino martial art uses rattan sticks (cane, baton). 


Beikoku Rembukan (Martial Spirit Polishing Hall) Dojo, Shindo Muso Ryu 


The Bo and Other Long Wooden Staff Martial Arts Techniques


Bo: Karate Weapon of Self-Defense.  By Fumio Demura.  Santa Clarita, California, Ohara Publications, 1976.  183 pages.  36th printing, 2002.  ISBN: 0897500199.  VSCL. 


Budo Blog


Buying a Jo Staff:  Sellers, Distributors, Vendors, Retailers, Manfacturers 


Chico Kodenkan   Chico, California.  Sensei Delina Fuchs, Yodan


Defensive Cane.  Instructional DVDs.  By the CDavis Group. 


Escrima - Wikipedia


European Jodo Federation (FEJ), Shinto Muso-ryu  


The Evolution of Classical Jojutzu.   By Dave Lowry.  23Kb.  Excellent overview. 


The First Walking Stick Kata.  Excellent detailed instructions with chart, Japanese names for techniques, footwork diagrams, and photographs.  From the Bushido Karate Academy. 


The Forbidden Kingdom


Goju-Shorei Weapons System.  By Master Dave McNeil.  Cane system.  A detailed textbook (288 pages). videos, canes and other products are offered for sale.  


Google Search:  Aikido Jo, Shinto Muso Ryu Jo,


Google Search Blogs:  Aikijo Shinto Muso Ryu 


The Japanese Short Staff.  By Don Zier and Tom Lang.  Burbank Publications, California, Unique Publications, 1985.  Glossary, 97 pages.  ISBN: 0865680582.  VSCL. 



Jo and Bokken Katas of Aikido.   By Greg Henry.


Jo: Art of the Japanese Short Staff.  By David Lowry and Mike Lee.  Black Belt Communications, Inc., 1987.  Eight printing, 2002.  Glossary, 191 pages.  ISBN: 0897501160. 
VSCL. 


Jo Do   


JoDo, La Voie du Bato.  By Pascal Krieger.  In French and English.  467 pages.  "Elève de l'Ecole du Budo de Tours, j'ai pu lire ce livre grâce à la bibliothèque mise en place par Joël Barillet,mon enseignant. J'ai lu beaucoup de livres mais peu m'auront transformé autant. Je ne voulais pas m'en séparer aussi j'ai demandé à Pascal Krieger, après une visite sur son site web, si je pouvais acheter un des exemplaires restants. Plus aucun exemplaire ne restait (ha la mise à jour des sites
web).  Avec la permission de Pascal Krieger, avec l'aide de ma société et de mon école, je le mets à votre disposition sur le web."


Jo:  The Combat Weapon of Japan and Okinawa.    By William Durbin.


Jo Do: The Way of the Stick 


Jodo Training Curriculum, Shindo Muso Ryu

 

 


Kaminoda Sensei and Shimizu Takaji Sensei (right)

 

Jo Do Videos: Tru-Flyte Martail Arts 


Jo Do - Wikipedia


Jojutsu - Wikipedia


Jo: The Japanese Short Staff.   By Don Weir.  Unique Publications, 1985.  102 pages.  ISBN: 0865680582.


Jo 31 Kata in 4 Directions   By Sensei Stefan Stenudd. 


Kendo - Wikipedia.   This martial arts uses bamboo wooden swords (shinai), about the length of the Jo, in fighting. 

 


Kihon, Uchi Tsuki Waza, 12 Basic Jo Techniques, From Shinto Muso-ryu Jodo System


Kobudo: The Okinawan Weapons Arts.   By Charles C. Goodin.  


Koryo.Com:  The Traditional Martial Arts of Japan  Lots of depth to this website. 


Links with Information about Shindo Muso Ryu Jodo and Related Topics
 


The Little Book of Jodo.  By Eric Tribe and Kim Taylor.  140 pages. 
"The Little Book of Jodo covers the ZNKR seitei jo. With over 500 black and white photos it covers the kihon tandoku (solo exercise), kihon sotai (partner basics exercise) and the kata (partner applications)."
 

Muso Shindo-Ryu Jodo 


The Pure Flow of the Jo.  Sensei Kishioka Tsuneo.  An article by Wayne Muromoto. 


Purchasing a Jo or Cane


Purple Heart Wooden Swords and Staff   


Quarterstaff 


Shinto Muso-ryu Jo


Shindo Muso Ryu Jodo: Links and Information


Shindo Muso Ryu Jodo (Japanese Stick Fighting) 


Shinto Muso Ryu - Wikipedia  

 

 

Shindo Muso Ryu Jodo 


Shinto Muso-ryu Jo


Shinto Muso-ryu Jodo  Resources from Koryu Books


Shinto Muso Ryu Jo Work, Featuring Shimizu Takaji. 


Short Stick and Cane (Tahn Bong and Ji Pang E Sul).  Instructional DVDs and book by Grandmaster Benko, PhD.  Instructional DVD, 100 minutes.  Advanced Cane DVD, Korean Cane Techniques Book.


Strikes with the Stick and Cane.  60 strikes are described by Tom Lang.  87Kb, PDF. 


Tales of a Budo Bum Blog


Total Stick Fighting: Shintaido Bojutsu.   By Aoki Hiroyuki.  Kodansha Europe, 2000.  140 pages.   ISBN: 4770023839.


Tsunami Shotokan Karate  Cane Work


Twenty Basis Jo Techniques   21 Kb.  


USA Jodo Federation 


Vendors, Retailers, and Manufacturers of Jos, Short Staffs, Canes, Walking Sticks   


Workshops, Seminars, Lectures, Demonstrations on the Cane, Walking Stick, Jo, Short Staff

 

 

Disclaimer

Warning:  Practicing with Staff Weapons Can Be a Dangerous Activity for Adults

 

 

 

Return to the Index at the Top of This Webpage

 

 

 

 

  
  

 

Taijiquan Cane
Zhàng
(Cane) or Gān or Gun (Staff),  Biān Gān (Whip Staff, Short Wooden Staff)
Duanbang 短棒, Chang 杖, Bang

 

 

 

Ba Ji Staff.  Taught by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye.  This 36 posture staff form was created by Grandmaster Wu Lian Zhi.  Produced by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye of the Capital District Tai Chi and Kung Fu Association of New York,  29 West Dillenbeck Drive, Albany, NY 12203.  This VHS videotape is 121 minutes and priced at $50.00.   Website: Jiang's Tai Chi Videos.  This is a long staff (bo, gun) wushu form. 


Beifang Qi Taiji Zhang.  Instructional DVD, 54 Minutes, 2006.  Tai Chi Cane Kata.  Developed by James Bouchard.  "Beifang Qi Taiji Zhang means 'Northern Energy Taiji Cane.' This exciting original form was created to introduce the cane to Taiji practitioners, and to introduce Taiji principles to martial artists interested in the cane.  Beifang Qi includes sets of "Qigong" or "energy exercises", multiple views of the form and a complete section on basic applications. Each movement is named for easy reference and the DVD version includes interactive menus.  Beifang Qi Taiji Zhang is appropriate for novices, yet experienced martial artists will find new levels of understanding.  Endorsed by Cane Masters International."   Video Clip  VSCL.  Notes.  
This DVD also includes a warm up Qigong routine that is useful for everyone.  It will be of special interest to those who practice the Eight Section Brocade Qigong form.  There are eight movements in the Beifang Qi Qigong form: 1.  Lifting the Sky, 2. Press Earth and Sky, 3. Drawing the Bow, 4. Look Over Shoulder, 5.  Touch the Earth, 6. Bear Swims with Cane, 7. Willow Tree Stretch, and 8. Wave Away Demons. 


Beifang Qi Taiji Zhang (Northern Energy Taiji Cane): List of Movements, Directions and Notes by Michael P. Garofalo. 


Cane and Walking Stick Books


Cane Links   Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Red Bluff, California. 


Cane Research Project at Valley Spirit Taijiquan


Cane - Wikipedia


Cane (Zhang, Gun) of Taijiquan


Chen Shen-Pu's Taijiquan Short Staff 74 FormTaught by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye, 1950-.  The title on the DVD is "Traditional Chen Family Tai Chi Short Staff."  This 74 movement form was created by Grand Master Chen Shen-Pu, 1902-2000.  Part 1, Movements 1-34; color, 120 minutes.  Part 2, Movements 35-74; color, 121 minutes.  Available in DVD or VHS format, for about $45.00 US each. 
Vendors: WLE, Wayfarer, JiangProduced by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye of the Capital District Tai Chi and Kung Fu Association of New York,  29 West Dillenbeck Drive, Albany, NY 12203, c 2000.  Website: Jiang's Tai Chi Videos.  "This is an elegant, dynamic form with many techniques. Good physical skills are recommended to learn this 74 movement form. Includes a short clip of the creator at age 94.  Following warm-up exercises, movements are repeated 3-4 times, depending on the difficulty. There are front and back views at slow and regular speeds. There are also reviews of segments, front and back." 1  "Master Chen Shen-Pu used his extensive training in external and internal forms such as Tai Chi, Xing Yi, Bagua Zhang and Wushu to create this short staff form.  A lesser known form, it is still a key ingredient to the Chen stylists repertoire."2  This form is for the 13 hands short staff.   Discussion   Chen Tai Chi Short Staff: List of Movements of 74 posture short staff form created by Master Chen Sheng-Pu; prepared by Gary McClellan.  Chen Shen-Pu's Taijiquan Short Staff 74 Movements Form, List of Movements and References prepared by Michael P. Garofalo.  I have not found any references in any standard Chen Family Taijiquan sources that state that Chen Shen-Pu's Taijiquan Short Staff 74 Movements Form, or other short staff or cane forms, are part of the Chen Family Taijiquan repertoire as are pole and spear forms.  VSCL. 


Chen Shen-Pu's Taijiquan Short Staff 74 Movements Form, List of Movements and References prepared by Michael P. Garofalo.


Chen Style of Taijiquan 


Chen Tai Chi Broadsword and Do Staff.  Instruction by Master Qing Zhou Chen. 


Chen Tai Chi 48 Movement Short Staff Demonstration by Huang Kang-Hui. UTube video, 2:29 min. 


Chen Tai Chi Short Whip Staff.  Taught by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye.  Three, 120 minute VHS videotapes in this series.  A 147 movement form in the Chen style, created by Hong Jun-sheng, an indoor student of Chen Fa-ke.  Cross Whip Staff and Field Whip Staff are taught.  Produced by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye of the Capital District Tai Chi and Kung Fu Association of New York, 29 West  Dillenbeck Drive, Albany, NY 12203.  Website: Jiang's Tai Chi Videos.  


Chen Taiji Short Staff 48 Movement Form  Utube video, 2:29 minutes. 


Chen Zhaobao Taijiqun.  UTube video, 3:20 minutes. 


Chinese Wand Exercises


Cloud Hands Blog: Taijiquan and Qigong  


Cloud Hands Index 


Cloud Hands Website


Dao (Saber, Broadsword) and Taijiquan   Bibliography, links, resources, quotes, notes.


Druid Wizard Staves and Wands


The Complete Book of Tai Chi Chuan: A Comprehensive Guide to the Principles and Practice.  By Wong Kiew Kit.  Shaftesbury, Dorset, Element, 1996.  Index, bibliography, 316 pages.  ISBN: 1852307927.  The reasons for Wu Tang Tai Chi Chuan favoring the sword over the staff, and for its limited use of weapons, are discussed in the chapter on Tai Chi weapons, pp. 278-285.


"Cultivating Jin with T'ai Chi Spear."  By Gerald A. Sharp.  T'ai Chi, Volume 27, No. 2, April, 2003, pp. 40-47.  Includes many photographs.  


Eight Dragons Baguazhang Cane Forms.  By Michael P. Garofalo.  Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Red Bluff, California. 


Eight Immortals Staff, Baxian Gun
.  A 61 posture staff form from Wudang Mountains.  It was created by imitating the features of the Taoist Eight Immortals: 1) He Xian-gu (with lotus flowers), 2) Li Tie-guai (with pilgrim's gourd and iron crutch), 3) Cao Gou-Jiu (with castanets), 4) Le Dong-bin (with fly-wisk and sword), 5) Han Xiang-zi (with a flute), 6) Zhuang-li Quan (with fan and peach of immortality), 7) Lan Cai-he (with basket of flowers), 8) Zhang Guo-lao (with drum).  Baixian Gun is part of the Wudang Eight Immortal School which is only handed down secretly to some favored disciples.


 

We Passed Level 1 Requirements for the Eight Immortals Taijiquan Cane Form.
We practiced together twice a week for the past four months, and many studied
and practiced this Taijquan Cane Form more hours every week. 
Read about the awarding of Level 1 certificates.  

 


Eight Immortals Taijiquan Cane, Routine One, Based on the Yang Style of Taijiquan.  As taught by Master Jesse Tsao.  This series of documents was prepared by Michael Garofalo, M.S., for students studying the Eight Immortals Taijiquan Cane at the Valley Spirit Taijiquan Center, in Red Bluff, California. 


Eight Section Brocade Qigong   By Michael P. Garofalo.  280Kb+.  History and purpose of this popular chi kung practice.  Descriptions for each of the eight movements, health benefits, comments, variations, extensive links and bibliography, resources, quotations, animated .gif photographs of the movements, and charts.  HTML format.  65 pages in Word.doc format.  This file is updated on a regular basis as I add new material, links, notes, and resources.  


Google: Tai Chi Cane, Tajiquan Cane,


Green Way Research   Red Bluff, California


Hsing I (Xing Yi) Chaun Five Elements Staff.  Instructional DVD.  "In this instructional video, Xingyi master Di Guoyong explains and demonstates the techniques and form of Xingyi Five-element Staff. Interlinked Staff is a traditional and routine with smooth and consistently strong movements. Strikes are fierce and vigorous, reflecting the characteristics and style of Xingyi Quan. It is a form well known throughout China. Movements of the Five-element Staff are concise and easy to learn and practice. Its skills are clear, methods are explicit, strength is great, and ability of skillful attack is strong. Five-element staff does not have flashy forms or techniques, but like Five-element Boxing pays great attention to the whole strength, body strength and work strength. Five-element Staff techniques are also named after the names of chop, drill, snap, cannon, crosscut in Five-element boxing." Vendors: One, Two, Three.


Index to the Cloud Hands Website   A detailed, alphabetically arranged, subject index to webpages and documents offered at the Cloud Hands Website.


Jian (Sword) Taijiquan: Bibliography, Links, Resources, Quotes, Notes   


"Jin Yiming's Walking Stick Exercises."   By Jin Yiming.  T'ai Chi: The International Magazine of T'ai Chi Ch'uan, Vol. 29, No. 1, February 2005, pp. 39-47.  A 22 form exercise system.  Descriptions of each exercise and line drawings.    


Magical Staffs in Taoist Rituals.  By Chen Yaoting. 


Martial Arts Techniques for the Cane and Short Staff.  By Michael P. Garofalo.    


The Old Yang Style Tai Chi Staff - Two Person Fighting Form   List of movements for both partners. 


Purchasing a Short Staff (Gun, Jo) or Zhang (Cane) 


Ripening Peaches:  Daoist Studies and Practices.  Taoist scriptures, bibliography, Quanzhen Daoism, Neidan, gardening, tea, history, qigong/daoyin, readings, etc. 


Shaolin Cane, Bodhidharma's Cane, Damo's Cane 


Shifu Zhang's Mysterious Taiji Cane


The Staff: Bibliography, Links, Quotes, Notes, Lessons


Sun Style Taijiquan


Sword (Jian) Taijiquan: Bibliography, Links, Resources, Quotes, Notes   180Kb.  


Tai Chi Cane Index


Tai Chi Cane (Zhang): Eight Immortals Taijiquan Cane, Routine One, Based on the Yang Style of Taijiquan. 


Tai Chi Cane (Zhang, Gun)


Tai Chi Chuan Walking Stick.   Kung Fu magazine, August 1996.  The walking stick forms are part of the Tchoung style of t'ai-chi ch'uan, developed by Grandmaster Tchoung Ta-tchen.  Sifu Kurland teaches this form.  


Tai Chi Partner Cane From (San Tsai Tuan Kun).  By Sifu Michael Gilman and Stephani Morel, Port Townsend, Washington.  Detailed instructions with b&w photographs online.  An instructional videotape is also available for Sifu Gilman, and available online.  "This is a useful, short (11 movements per side) partner form. When the transition is added, one ends up with a beautiful, instructive partner or solo form. These lessons are divided into sections. The first is the Introduction and all the applications for the form. The second and third sections break down each of the two sides and teach the movements. The last section shows the   form performed as a partner form. Keep in mind that there is a companion VHS video tape available through the on-line store."  Tai Chi Partner Cane (San Tsai Tuan Kun).  Three Powers Stick, Short Stick practices.  There are videos on UTube for each lesson:  Lesson One 8:32, Lesson Two: 9:15, Lesson Three, 8:27, Lesson Four, 9:11, Lesson Five, 8:55, Lesson Six, 9:24, Lesson Seven, 6:04. 


Tai Chi Stick and Staff.  Instructional DVD by Mark Peters. 


Taiji Sticking Staff  This webpage discusses use of the long staff and includes descriptions and photographs of a two person routine. 


Tai Chi Sword (Jian)


Tai Chi Sword, Saber and Staff.  By Stuart A. Olson.  Yearning K. Chen Series, Volume 5.  Bubbling Well Press, 1986.  ASIN: 0938045032.  


Taiji and Shaolin Staff Fundamental Training.  Performed by Yang, Jwing-Ming, PhD.  Boston, YMAA, 2003.  Instructional VHS videotape.  90 minutes.  ISBN: 1594390088.
 

 


                             



Taiji Cane (Zhang, Gun) 


Taiji Fa Jing Stick, Yang Medium Stick.  Instruction by Earle Montague.  UTube video, 5:12 minutes. 


Taijiquan Cane Index 


Taijiquan Cane (Zhang): Eight Immortals Taijiquan Cane, Routine One, Based on the Yang Style of Taijiquan.


Taijiquan Walking Stick Form of Master Chen Pan-Ling.


Taijiquan Walking Stick Form of Master T. T. Liang.  Taiji Weapons: Cane, Saber and Double Edged Sword.  Instructional video by Paul Gallagher, 60 minutes.  The cane form was created by Master T. T. Liang (1900-2002). "The weapon sets are the final stage of T'ai chi solo training. each weapon has its own particular function and spirit, and develops the body and ch'i in a different way.  Starting with the cane, a basic level weapon, progressing to the saber, and going on to the extremely subtle and sophisticated sword, this video gives you complete and detailed instruction in each of these weapon sets."- Paul Gallagher.   "Knowing T.T. Liang, I would not be surprised if he drew from several sources to create his cane form. In his expanded Yang system, the cane was a stepping stone weapon that one used to begin training with weapons where one didn't need to pay close attention to edge angle, using the blade flat, etc, that one must when using a blade. There are certainly some jian movements in his cane form." - Dan Pasek. "Not historically, there is no mention [of stick forms] in any of the Yang Family writings, or those by their direct students, of the first three generations of Yang Family teaching any weapons other than jian, dao, gun and chiang.  Later teachers in the Yang lineage created new forms such as the walking stick and the fan. T.T. Liang created his own stick form; and Wang Yen-nien created a fan form.  I believe Master Liang taught his "Cane" form to many students, but personally, the only weapon I studied with him is the jian.  So my knowledge of the Cane is quite limited.  My classmate and senior student of Liang, Paul Gallagher, produced a how to video that includes instruction on Liang's Tai Chi Cane form that you might find useful."- Scott Rodell.  Video 1 


Taiji Stick Form.  UTube video, 49 seconds. 


Taiji Sticking Staff.  By Zhang Yun and Peter Kindfeld


Taiji Staff.   By Chip Ellis. 


Taiji Walking Stick.  UTube, 1:11. 

 

Taiji Yangsheng Zhang: Taiji Stick Qigong (Chinese Health Qigong)  By the Chinese Health Qigong Association.  Singing Dragon, 2014.  96 pages.  1 instructional DVD.  ISBN: 978-1848191945.  VSCL. 
"A set of exciting and unusual Taiji Stick qigong exercises is presented in this accessible introduction. Embodying the concepts of taiji, the movements emphasize the harmony of yin and yang, man and nature. Appropriate for all levels of experience and for all age groups, this new set of easy-to-learn exercises distils the essence of traditional stick practice, guides body movements and the movement of the stick, and coordinates directed breathing and imagination. The book provides step-by-step, fully-illustrated instruction, and includes an account of the origins of the movements and guidance for practice. An accompanying DVD features a video demonstrating the form and additional information on its history and origins, and a CD provides options for verbal instructions to lead the practitioner through the exercises, or music to accompany them. The book is an authoritative resource that will help students and practitioners of taiji, qigong, martial arts and Chinese medicine perfect and deepen their practice. It is also an excellent practical introduction for anyone with an interest in the ancient health and martial practices of China.  The Chinese Health Qigong Association is dedicated to the popularization of and research into Health Qigong, and is a group member of the All-China Sports Federation. Its aim is to promote and carry forward the Chinese traditional culture of health promotion and facilitate the communication between Western and Eastern Cultures."

 

 



Taoist Secret Style Xuan Wu Staff.  VCD Product.  In Chinese.   WuDang style staff demonstrated and taught by You XuanDe.  2 hours.  


Tchoung Ta-tchen Walking Stick Form, Yang Taiji Tuan KunGrandmaster Tchoung Ta-tchen (1911-2000) taught in China, Taiwan, Vancouver, and Seattle.  There is a right hand version and left hand version of this solo stick/cane form; and a partner form developed by Tchoung Ta-tchen's senior students.  The walking stick forms are part of the Tchoung style of t'ai-chi ch'uan, a Yang style variant, developed by Grandmaster Tchoung Ta-tchen.  Sifu Harvey Kurland and Sifu Andrew Dale, master instructors, teach this form.  "Tchoung had a particular interest is studying the sword and stick forms. He learned several sword styles from the top masters of the day. The sword forms had names such as "Green Duckweed Sword", green bamboo sticks of the beggars style, Kun Lun (Kwin Lin) sword, Heaven and Earth sword, as well as the t'ai chi sword, double sword, as well as Yang and Wu t'ai-chi knife sets. He developed his own t'ai chi Tuan Kune or walking stick form which he taught to his students." - Harvey Kurland Kung Fu magazine, August 1996.  "The cane should be performed like you are using a whip.  Quick in hand action and footwork.  This form is the creation of Grandmaster Tchoung Ta-tchen.  Based upon the pattern of the San Tsai Jian (Three Powers Sword).  This form combines two other styles he studied from a Taoist martial arts teacher: the Beggar's Bamboo stick and the Green Duckweed stick." Section One is the right hand side, Section Two the left hand side, and Section Three is "actually the Bagua Cyclone Saber Form which adapts very easily to the cane applications."  -  Xin Qi Shen Dojo, Yang Taiji Tuan Kun.  There is a list of movement names, 37 movements, Taiji Tuan Kun, Section One, from Xin Qi Shen Dojo.  The Xin Qi Shen Dojo (Wuji.com) in Seattle now offers a Yang Taiji Weapons demonstration DVD, which includes a demonstration of the solo cane form, according to their Winter 2009 Newsletter.  There is a list of movement names, Solo Cane Form (33 movements), and the Partner Cane Form (15 movements) from Gene Burnett, Ashland OR.  Gene Burnett offers a demonstration DVD of the Taiji Weapons in this style of Taijiquan.  He demonstrates Tchoung's Cane Form, both the Left Side and Right Hand, and the Right Side and Left Hand sequences.  The demonstration includes multiple repetitions of each side of the solo cane form; and a good demonstration of both sides of the partner form and skillful partner play with a lady partner (VSCL).  There is a list of the movement names for Tchoung's Solo Walking Stick Form, Section One, Left Side, Right Hand, 35 movements, including directions, notes and a bibliography by Mike Garofalo.  Gene Burnett has been helpful to me in learning about this cane form: [T'ai-Chi for Geniuses.  A Practice Companion for the Genius in Everyone.  By Gene Burnett, Ashland, Oregon. Bloomington, Indiana, IUniverse Inc, 2009.  284 pages.  EBook: 9781440111921.]  
 


Techniques for the Cane and Short Staff 


Thunder Stick Form developed by Chen Pan-Ling and as taught by Chen Yun-Ching.


Traditional Ba Gua Staff with Applications.  Taught by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye.  120 minute VHS videotape.  A 19 movement form in the Ba Gua Zhang style, created by Professor Jiang Zhou Chu.  Produced by Shifu  Jiang Jian-ye of the Capital District Tai Chi and Kung Fu Association of New York,  29 West Dillenbeck Drive, Albany, NY 12203.  Website: Jiang's Tai Chi Videos.  


Traditional Chen Family Tai Chi Short Staff.  Taught by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye, 1950-. This 74 movement form was created by Grand Master Chen Shen-Pu, 1902-2000.  Part 1, Movements 1-34; color, 120 minutes.  Part 2, Movements 35-74; color, 121 minutes.  Available in DVD or VHS format, for about $45.00 US each. 
Vendors: WLE, Wayfarer, JiangProduced by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye of the Capital District Tai Chi and Kung Fu Association of New York,  29 West Dillenbeck Drive, Albany, NY 12203, c 2000.  Website: Jiang's Tai Chi Videos.  "This is an elegant, dynamic form with many techniques. Good physical skills are recommended to learn this 74 movement form. Includes a short clip of the creator at age 94.  Following warm-up exercises, movements are repeated 3-4 times, depending on the difficulty. There are front and back views at slow and regular speeds. There are also reviews of segments, front and back." 1  "Master Chen Shen-Pu used his extensive training in external and internal forms such as Tai Chi, Xing Yi, Bagua Zhang and Wushu to create this short staff form.  A lesser known form, it is still a key ingredient to the Chen stylists repertoire."2  This form is for the 13 hands short staff.   Discussion   Chen Tai Chi Short Staff: List of Movements of 74 posture short staff form created by Master Chen Sheng-Pu; prepared by Gary McClellan.  Chen Shen-Pu's Taijiquan Short Staff 74 Movements Form, List of Movements and References prepared by Michael P. Garofalo.  I have not found any references in any standard Chen Family Taijiquan sources that state that Chen Shen-Pu's Taijiquan Short Staff 74 Movements Form, or other short staff or cane forms, are part of the Chen Family Taijiquan repertoire as are pole and spear forms. 


Traditional Chen Family Tai Chi Short Form, List of Movements and References prepared by Michael P. Garofalo.


Traditional Tai Chi Eight Immortals Cane, Routine One.  Demonstrated by Master Jesse Tsao.  Instructional DVD, 64 minutes.  Produced by Tai Chi Healthways, San Diego, 2008.  Routine One is based on the Yang Style of Taijiquan.  Master Tsao developed this cane form himself, with grandmaster Zhu Tiancai's support. 


Traditional Tai Chi Eight Immortals Cane, Routine Two (Cannon Cane).  Demonstrated by Master Jesse Tsao.  Instructional DVD, 65 minutes.  Produced by Tai Chi Healthways, San Diego, 2008.  Routine Two, Cannon Cane, is based on the Chen Style of Taijiquan.  Master Tsao developed this cane form himself, with grandmaster Zhu Tiancai's support. 


Traditional Eight Immortals Taijiquan Cane, Routine One, Based on the Yang Style of Taijiquan.  As taught by Master Jesse Tsao.  This series of documents was prepared by Michael Garofalo, M.S., for students studying the Eight Immortals Taijiquan Cane at the Valley Spirit Taijiquan Center, in Red Bluff, California. 


Traditional Yang Family Tai Chi Short Staff 104 Forms.  This short staff form was created in 1974 by Xu Minshan, who was an indoor student of Yang Chengfu.  Xu Minshan created the form to combine Yang style Tai Chi Chuan postures with the traditional Yang style long staff form.  This long form, suitable for persons at all skill levels, is taught using two instructional VHS videotapes featuring Shifu Jiang Jian-ye (1950-).  Tape 1, Part 1, teaches movements 1-50 of this form (VHS, 112 minutes).  Tape 2, Part 2, teaches movements 51 -104 of this form (VHS, 112 minutes).  Produced by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye of the Capital District Tai Chi and Kung Fu Association of New York, 29 West Dillenbeck Drive, Albany, NY 12203.  These videotapes were produced in 2002, and priced at $45.00 each.  Website: Jiang's Tai Chi Videos.  Shifu Jiang Jian-ye began his studies of Wushu in 1955 in China and he was educated in China.  He is a  physical education, tai chi, kung fu, and calligraphy teacher.  This videotape begins with an introduction of Shifu Jiang, includes a little history of this short staff form, includes a number of short staff warm up exercises, and then teaches the form.  Each movement is introduced, named, and then illustrated.  A front view of the movement is shown as the teacher provides verbal instructions and tips.  The front view is repeated and then a back view of the movement is shown.  I find the instructions clear and understandable; and the videotape production is good.  

 

 
Traditional Yang Family Tai Chi Short Staff 68 Forms.  This long form, suitable for persons at all skill levels, is taught using two instructional VHS 
videotapes featuring Shifu Jiang Jian-ye (1950-). "Traditional Yang Style Tai Chi Staff is a classic weapon routine. This form comes from Grand Master Sun Jixian. At the age of 18 he went to Bejing to study with Grand Master Wang Jiaoyu. Wang Jiayou was an indoor student of Yang Banhou who was the son of Yang Luchan, the founder of Yang family Tai Chi Chuan."   


Traditional Zhao-Bao Family Tai Chi Staff.  Taught by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye.  Two 120 minute videotapes.  Includes applications.  Produced by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye of the Capital District Tai Chi and Kung Fu Association of New York,  29 West Dillenbeck Drive, Albany, NY 12203.  Website: Jiang's Tai Chi Videos.  


Traditional Zing-Yi Staff with Applications.  Taught by Master Jiang Jian-ye.  This 50 posture staff form was created by Ji Long Feng at the end of the Ming Dynasty.  Produced by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye of the Capital District Tai Chi and Kung Fu Association of New York,  29 West Dillenbeck Drive, Albany, NY 12203.  This VHS videotape is 120 minutes and priced at $50.00.   Website: Jiang's Tai Chi Videos.  


Valley Spirit Center, Red Bluff, California   VSCL = Valley Spirit Center Library


Vendors, Retailers, and Manufacturers of Short Staffs, Canes, Walking Sticks   


VSCL = Valley Spirit Taijiquan Library Collection, Red Bluff, California. 

 

Walking Stick and Cane Books 


Walking Stick Retailers and Manufacturers


Walking Stick Wikipedia


"Wang Shu-Chin's T'ai Chi Walking Stick," By Manfred Erich Rottmann, T'ai Chi International Magazine of T'ai Chi Ch'uan, Vol. 18, No. 6, December, 1994, pp. 26-29.  Wang Shu-Chin (1904-1981).  Mr. Yoshikatsu Kohno told me on 2/5/09 that this walking stick form had 24 movements, was Xing Yi based, and was done with a walking stick of about 1 meter in length. 


Wind Sweeps Away the Plum Blossoms: The Principles and Techniques of Yung Style Tai Chi Spear and Staff.  By Stuart A. Olson.  Bubbling Springs Press, 1986.  ISBN: 0938045008.  


Winding Dragon Wudang Staff.  Pan Long Men Wudang Martial Arts.  Featuring Sun, Xiang. 


Workshops, Seminars, Lectures, Demonstrations on the Cane, Walking Stick, Jo, Short Staff


Wu Dang Mind/Body Arts


Wudang Short Staff.   Featuring Master You, Ming Sheng.  Wudang Song Xi Branch Series.  Tiger Tail Stick. 


Wudang Stick Training Methods.  Earle Montague.  UTube video, 4:25 minutes. 

 

武当山虎尾鞭杆
Wudang Shan Hu Wei Bian Gun


Wudang Tiger Tail Short Staff
Wu Dang 13 Hands Staff, Whip Staff, Wooden Walking Stick Form


 

                  



Wudang Tiger Tail Short Staff.  Demonstration by Master You, Ming Sheng.  "The Wudang Song Xi Style of Kung Fu offers this short stick form, which is also called the "Tiger Tail Stick".   This is a traditional internal routine. Every form contains both defending & attacking applications.  This form has the fierceness of the broadsword, the convenience of a staff, and the agileness of sword."


Wudang Tiger Tail Short Staff.  An instructional VCD featuring Ben Tan. 
"A nice set with a "short" staff, often called a whip. Reverse hand and off angles whipping style attacks. Well constructed with a number of hand changes. Back and front hand motions combined. Distinctive Tiger Tail motions as ground sweeps.  VCD 1 hour, in Chinese only."  This form is from the Wu-Tang Nan-Zong Song-Xi Style, or Wu-Tang Souther Sect Pine and Stream Style.  Available from Plum Publications.  Also available from Wudang Tiger Tail Short Staff Wudang Kung Fu Series - Stick-Wielding Arts, Products No.:VCD0424, 1 VCD.Instructional VCD.  "Weapon is considered to be a hand extension. This weapon routine is similar to its bare hand routine, using softness to defeat firmness, following the pattern to gain a beneficial vantage point. Wooden sticks, bamboo sticks or even umbrella can be used as a weapon for this routine. The weapons are often used to attack opponents with its backward stroke, moving in all directions, from left to right, making the opponent unable to fight back. Once the opponents lose control for a single moment, their defeat is irreversible." 


Wudang Tiger Tail Short Staff.  "Wu Dang Short-Stick Skilled Fighting Form (Also called Tiger-tail Whip) is a mysterious routine set that kept hidden for a long time and in fact, it is of category of Internal Kung Fu. More than 40 forms consist of the whole set and each one is simple and be free from any extravagance. The whole set looks seemingly putting more emphasis upon defense but actually every pose has the hidden nature of fierce assault. In terms of defense and fighting, all postures look more close and tight ready for awaiting any attack, so, it is more applicable than general forms." VCD format. 


Wudang Tiger Tail Short Staff.  Taught by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye.  "Traditional Wu Dang Mountain, Wu Dang Tiger Tail Short Staff, 48 Forms with Applications.  114 minute instructional DVD or VHS videotape.  Produced in 2004 by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye of the Capital District Tai Chiand Kung Fu Association of New York,  29 West Dillenbeck Drive, Albany, NY 12203.  Website: Jiang's Tai Chi Videos.  "This 48-form short staff routine from Wu Dang Mountain is an in-door form that is short but effective and is taught with applications. It is taught step-by-step with multiple angles and repetitions. There are reviews of segments and demonstrations at the end.  It is a useful in-door secret form.  The whole form is short and efficient." 
All CDTKA instructional media include an introduction to the skills and qualifications of Shifu Jiang Jian-ye.  After presenting two or three postures, the Shifu Jian-ye presents martial arts applications for each postures.  He also reviews, at slow and regular speeds, sequences of postures.  There are demonstrations of the entire form, front view, at regular speed, and a demonstration of the entire form, back view, and a slow speed.  The instruction is in clear, precise and detailed English.  Many repetitions at different speeds.  VSCL.   


Wudang Tiger Tail Short Staff: List of Movements and Notes.  Names of each of the 48 postures in this Wudang Mountain Taoist Short Staff Form.  The "Short Staff" is sometimes called a "13 Hands Staff" or "Whip Staff."  Prepared by Michael P. Garofalo, M.S..  March 2009.  Names are based on the teaching by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye in his instructional DVD, Wu Dang Tiger Tail Short Staff.


"The Wudang Mountains (simplified Chinese: 武当山; traditional Chinese: 武當山; pinyin: Wǔdāng Shān), also known as Wu Tang Shan or simply Wudang, are a small mountain range in the Hubei province of China, just to the south of the manufacturing city of Shiyan.  In years past, the mountains of Wudang were known for the many Taoist monasteries to be found there, monasteries which became known as an academic centre for the research, teaching and practice of meditation, Chinese martial arts, traditional Chinese medicine, Taoist agriculture practises and related arts. As early as the Eastern Han Dynasty (25-220AD), the mountain attracted the Emperor's attention. During the Tang Dynasty (618-907), the first site of worship - the Five Dragon Temple - was constructed. The Hall of Yuzhen is the cradle of Wudang kung fu. In 1417, Ming Dynasty Emperor Zhudi (朱棣) decreed Wudang to be the "Grand Mountain" and ordered the construction of the Hall of Yuzhen for Master Zhang Sanfeng.  Wudang Mountain martial arts is known far more for its swordplay, and Shaolin Temple for its staff work."
-   Wikipedia


武当山
虎尾鞭杆
 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 


Wushu Shaolin Staff.  Taught by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye.  Produced by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye of the Capital District Tai Chi and Kung Fu Association of New York,  29 West Dillenbeck Drive, Albany, NY 12203.  This DVD or VHS videotape is 75 minutes.  Website: Jiang's Tai Chi Videos.  This is a long staff (bo, gun) wushu form. 


Yang Tai Chi Staff.  Taught by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye.  This short staff form was created by Sun Jixian, who was an indoor student of Yang Banjou.  This long form, suitable for persons at all skill levels, is taught using two instructional VHS videotapes featuring Shifu Jiang Jian-ye (1950-).  Tape 1, Part 1, teaches movements 1-34 of this form (VHS, 120 minutes).  Tape 2, Part 2, teaches movements 35-68 of this form (VHS, 117 minutes).  Produced by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye of the Capital District Tai Chi and Kung Fu Association of New York, 29 West Dillenbeck Drive, Albany, NY 12203.  These videotapes were produced in 2002, and priced at $45.00 each.  Website: Jiang's Tai Chi Videos.  


Yang Style of Tai Chi Chuan.   Includes numerous staff forms.


Zhao-Bao (He Family) Tai Chi Staff.  Instructional DVD by Jiang Jian-ye. 

 

Videos Online about the Taijiquan Short Staff

Bagua Cane   Ian Sinclair of Cloud Mountain Martial Arts 

Tai Chi Cane on UTube

Tai Chi Stick Form.  UTube video, 2:52 min. 

WuDang Cane and Self-Defense

 

"The Chinese staff is called gun (棍 pinyin gùn). Its practice is commonly divided into two main areas: Northern staff techniques (influenced by spear play) and Southern staff techniques. Many styles and techniques exist but the best known outside of China is the Shaolin Temple staff techniques as practiced by the monks in Chinese medieval times (Tang dynasty 900s-1000s) and later by their disciples in pre-modern China (1600s-1900s) by anti-Manchu/Ching dynasty revolutionaries (Han Chinese patriots) prior to the wide-spread use of firearms. The techniques made their usual dissemination throughout the rest of Asia to be blended in with other countries' native fighting techniques.
     There are many forms of staff used as a staff of office; an item which symbolises a position, rank or prestige. In China, there are two types of staves: the wenren zhang ("the scholar staff")(文人杖) which is a symbol of status, and the shiyong zhang(實用杖) ("practical staff") which has more practical uses. Compasses, telescopes, weapons, and even medicine could be put within the much thicker shiyong zhang to be taken out when necessary. The zhang (杖)itself could often be used as a gun (棍), a fighting stick."
Wikipedia - Staff Stick
 

 

Return to the Index at the Top of This Webpage

 

 

 

 

  
  

 

Aikido Founder Morihei Ueshiba with Jo, 1966 

Aikido Founder Morihei Ueshiba with Jo, 1966 
Quality Posters from Aikido Journal

 

Disclaimer

Warning:  Practicing with Staff Weapons Can Be a Dangerous Activity for Adults


  
  

 


 

Other Martial Arts Styles of Short Staff

 

Advanced Stick Fighting.  By Maasaki Hatsumi.  Kodansha International, 2005.  208 pages.  ISBN: 4770029969.  VSCL.   


Arnis: Toma Modern Arnis.  Master Thomas (Toma) Rosenzweig.  Home of Modern Arnis in Los Angeles.  Phone: 1-818-339-4051. 

 

 


Ba Gua Zhang (Pa Kua Chang) Short Staff Practices


Bagua Cane Form.  Demonstrated by Ian Sinclair.  UTube video, 0:58 min. 


Bagua Cyclone Saber and Cane 


Bagua Pole Form.  Demonstration by Erle Montague.  Video,


Bagua Seven Star Short Staff.  UTube video, 1:04 min.  Seven Star Stick (staff, rod, pole) (Qi Xing Gan)


"Throughout eastern Asia, these stars compose the Northern Dipper. They are colloquially named "The Seven Stars of the Northern Dipper" (Chinese: 北斗七星; pinyin: běidǒu qīxīng; Japanese Hiragana:ほくとしちせい; Korean: Hangul: 북두칠성, Romaja: Bukduchilseong; Vietnamese : chòm sao Bắc Đẩu). The seven stars are very important in Taoist astrology."
Big Dipper


Bagua Staff.   八卦棍.  UTube video, 1:08 min. 


Bagua Staff.  UTube video, 1:39 min. 


Ba Gua Staff with Applications.  Created by Professor Jiang Zhou Chun, "a respected professor of martial arts (Wu Shu)."  Taught by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye on a 124 minute instructional DVD.  This 19 movement form is in the "traditional" Ba Gua Zhang style.  The title on the DVD cover is "Traditional Ba Gua Staff with Applications."  Produced in 2000 by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye of the Capital District Tai Chi and Kung Fu Association of New York,  29 West Dillenbeck Drive, Albany, NY 12203.   "It combines elements that characterize Baguazhang with movements that are specific to staff techniques. It develops flexibility throughout the body, and increases joint mobility."   Website: Jiang's Tai Chi Videos.  Vendor: WLE.  This is primarily an eyebrow length staff form; however, it can be practiced with a waist high staff.  VSCL. 

 

 

Ba Gua Staff.  Created by Professor Jiang Zhou Chun, and taught by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye.  List of movement names, detailed descriptions, notes, bibliography, and links.  By Michael Garofalo. 


Bagua Swimming Dragon Staff Form.  Created by Chen Pan-Ling.  Demonstration DVD by his son, Chen Yun-Ching.  No. 1:  Dragon Lifts His Head.  No. 2: Dragon Emerges from the Sea.  No. 3:  Dragon Turns Its Body.  No. 4:  Dragon Looking Behind.  No. 5:  Dragon Shakes Its Tail.  No. 6:  Dragon Playing Roughly.  No. 7:  Dragon Rolls Over.  No. 8: Dragon Displays Its Invincible Prowess.  This a long staff set of 6:32 seconds.  The staff is an eyebrow staff length.  My Bagua teacher, Shifu Kent Howard, learned this bagua staff form. 


Baguazhang VCDs.  Includes some staff forms in various bagua styles. 


Ba Gua Zhang ( Pa Kua Chang):  Bibliography, links, resources, quotes, and notes.  Circle walking internal martial arts.  By Michael P. Garofalo.  210 Kb+.   Baguazhang includes some staff forms.  


Baguazhang Pole Form.  Instructional DVD by Erle Montague. 


Cheng Style Baguazhang Swimming Body Staff.  VCD. 


Eight Circular Bagua Staff   Instructional video, 35:22 minutes. 


Eight Directions Seven Star Staff.  Created by Andrew Dale of the Xin Qi Shen Dojo. 


Eight Dragons Baguazhang Cane Forms.  By Michael P. Garofalo.  Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Red Bluff, California. 


Seven Star Praying Mantis Kung Fu History 


Seven Stars Bagua Staff.  "Classical Baguazhang, Volume XVII, Bagua Seven Stars Staff."  By Joseph Crandall.  Smiling Tiger Martial Arts, 2008, 96 pages.  "This is an introduction to the English public of the Bagua Seven Stars Staff. Presented here are the routines for this weapon from two different lineages, that of Guo Gumin and that of Liu Xinghan. Both versions are similar, but have some interesting differences. This book allows the student to compare and contrast the two lineages."  ISBN: 978-1-929047-78-9. 


Yang Wulang Bagua Staff (Hongquan).  UTube video, 2:13 min. 


 


Bartitsu  


Bian Gan (Whip Staff), Zhang Xigui.  UTube, 3:59 min. 


Bodhidharma's or Damo's Cane Wushu  UTube, 2:01 min. 


Bodhidharma's Short Staff Form, Damo Gun.  UTube, 1:25 min. 


British Quarter Staff Association  "The British Quarterstaff Association teaches men the art and technique of the quarterstaff, a weapon whose use predates written history.  Today, the British Quarterstaff Association provides men with a form of training that is rooted in British traditions, through regular classes and events.  As a combat form, the use of the quarterstaff requires learning sets of attacks and defenses, coordination of eye, hand and body and how to focus intention.  More fundamental than these is learning how to use posture and weight shifting to direct energy economically. Still more fundamental is adopting the approach of the warrior.  Working regularly with the staff develops strength. Confronting fear develops courage. Observing the effective use of techniques develops skill. The aim of the warrior is to use strength, courage and skill in all circumstances, not just when he holds a staff."


"Broadsword and Singlestick - with Chapters on Quarter-staff, Bayonet, Cudgel, Shillalah, Walking Stick, Umbrella and other Weapons of Self Defense; The Quarter-Staff"  By Allanson-Winn, R.G. and C. Phillipps-Wolley.  London : George Bell & Sons. 1st edition, 1898.  


Cane and Walking Stick Books


Cane Links  Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Red Bluff, California 


Cane Research Project at Valley Spirit Taijiquan 

 

Canary Islands Stick Fighting.  JUEGO DEL PALO - Stick Fencing of the Canary IslandsJournal of Western Martial Art , May 2000, by Tony Wolf. 


Canary Islands Stick Fighting. 
Martial Arts of the World. An Encyclopedia of History and Innovation (Thomas Green & Joseph Svinth (Eds.), ABC-CLIO, 2010): Canary Islands Stick Fighting and Wrestling by Carlos Gutiérrez García (University of León, León, Spain) and Juan Carlos Martín (University of León, León, Spain)


Definitions: Short staff or stick weapons: Arnis sticks, Hanbo, Jō (Japanese stick weapon), Kurunthadi, Kubotan, Otta, Shillelagh, Tambo, Tonfa, Yawara, Yubi-bo.  Long weapons (staff and spear weapons):  Arbir (Indonesian halberd), Bisento (Chinese origin halberd), Bō (Japanese staff weapon), Eku, Gun (staff), Ji (halberd), Jogo do Pau (Portuguese Staff and baton), Guan dao or Kwan dao (large Chinese halberd), Kurunthadi,  Ox tongue, Lathi, Pudao (long handled sword), Halberd, Monk's Spade, Nagamaki (Japanese polearm), Naginata (Japanese polearm), Qiang (spear), Quarterstaff, Sarissa, Sibat (Filipino/Indonesian spear), Spear, Taiaha (Maori wooden duelling spear/staff), Kanabō  (Japanese iron staff), Yari (Japanese spear). 


Dowsing 


Eight Immortals Taijiquan Cane, Routine One, Based on the Yang Style of Taijiquan.  As taught by Master Jesse Tsao.  This series of documents was prepared by Michael Garofalo, M.S., for students studying the Eight Immortals Taijiquan Cane at the Valley Spirit Taijiquan Center, in Red Bluff, California. 


 

          


Egyptian Royal Regalia - Scepter and Staff
 


Fatal Flute and Stick Forms: Wah Lum Kung Fu.   By Poi Chan.  Unique Publications, 1985.  151 pages.   ISBN: 0865680590.  


The Fighting Staff.  By Dwight C. McLemore.  Paladin Press, 2010.  234 pages.  ISBN: 1581607148. 


Five Tigers Swarm a Herd of Sheep Staff Form.  List of movements.  Used in Shaolin staff practices, kung fu, and Chen Style Taijiquan. 


The Ferocious Enchanted Staff of Ancient Monks.  By Dr. Leung Ting.  95 pages.  This book consists of the origination, form, and application of the “ferocious enchanted staff” – a translation from a hand-transcribed book of ancient times!

 

 

*****


The Forbidden Kingdom.  A major fantasy motion picture, distributed in 2008.  All dialogue is in English.  Starring Jackie Chan (Lu Yan the drunken Taoist immortal and an old Boston pawnshop owner), Jet Li (a quiet Buddhist monk and the immortal Monkey King), Michael Angarano (Jason, an American teenager), Liu Yifei (Golden Sparrow, a beautiful young woman seeking revenge), Li Bing Bing (the White Haired witch-sorceress), and Collin Chou (the evil Jade Warlord sorcerer).  Directed by Rob Minkoff.  Martial Arts director; Yuen Woo-Ping.  Screenplay by John Fusco.  Cinematography by Peter Pau.  Multiple producers, and distributed by the Lion's Gate Studio and the Weinstein Company.  104 minutes, DVD, with many extra features and outtakes.  This film features many beautiful and elaborate sets from the largest film studio in the world, Hengdian World Studio, or "Chinawood," near Shanghai, China.  This was the first on-screen collaboration between the famous Hong Kong actors Jackie Chan and Jet Li.

The magical staff of the Monkey King must be returned to free the Monkey King imprisoned in stone by the evil Jade Warlord, and a team of four (Chan, Li, Angarano, and Yifei) go on a quest to return the staff and must battle the evil doers (Bing, Chou) along the way.  Plenty of sorcery special effects, dramatic high flying and high quality martial arts fighting, excellent cinematography, superb scenery in China, and a complex blend of Chinese myth, lore and philosophy.  The plot will appeal more to persons under 20 years of age, followers of Chinese martial arts and lore, lovers of quests and coming of age tales, fanciers of the picturesque, and, of course, to aficionados of the staff.   Many elements from the epic Chinese story, Journey to the West, and other characters from Chinese folklore and martial arts films are integrated in this fantasy story.  Michael Angarano's character of Jason (a dreamy weak teenager transformed into a brave warrior), is a blend of Daniel LaRusso in the Karate Kid, Bilbo Baggins in The Lord of the Rings, and Dorothy in the The Wizard of Oz.  Jason is mentored and taught martial arts by Lu Yan the drunken Taoist/Zen man (played by Jackie Chan) and the quiet Buddhist monk (played by Jet Li).  Magickal time travel and shape-shifting add complex twists to the fantasy.  

 

            

 

*****

 

Forza: The Samurai Sword Workout.  Kick Butt and Get Buff with High Intensity Sword Fighting Moves.  By Illaria Montagnani.  Photographs by Bill Morris.  Berkeley, California, Ulysses Press, 2005.  140 pages.  ISBN: 1569754780.  Practice is done with a wooden replica of a Smuarai sword - a cane would suffice. 


French Cane Fighting


Horse Hair Whisk (Fu Chen), Taoist Ceremonial Whisk  "Before before the disciple leaves for three years, the Daoist master gives him a three things to remind the disciple of his objectives,  First, he gives him a red belt, 3.3 feet long, to remind the student to tame the mind for this time period, to be serious, and to keep his mind at peace.  Second, the Fu Chen (horsehair whisk) to remind him to befriend good people and help others. If he is enamored with something and is tempted to return to society, he must whisk away these ideas, like the Fu Chen. Third, the disciple is given a sword.  If he has lost his way and has lost himself, the disciple remembers that his master has given him the sword to cut away these ideas, so that he may continue on his path."


Horse Hair Whisk, Taoist Exercise Form.  A vigorous and lively exercise form.  Video demonstrations:  Demonstration 1, Demonstration 2.  The whish is used to shoo away flies and other insects. 


Index to the Cloud Hands Website   A detailed, alphabetically arranged, subject index to webpages and documents offered at the Cloud Hands Website.


Irish Stick Fighting, Faction Fighting, Celtic Martial Arts, Bata


Irish Stick Fighting - Uisce Beatha Bata Rince.  Whiskey Stick Dancing.    


Jogo do Pau.  Journal of Manly Arts. 


Korean Tahn Bong, By Grand Master James S. Benko, Ph.D. 


Kung Fu Walking Stick Demonstration.  UTube, 0:45 min. 


Martial Arts Techniques for the Cane and Short Staff.  By Michael P. Garofalo.    


Praying Mantis Staff With Applications.  Taught by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye.  122 minute VHS videotape.  A 25 posture combination of Seven Stars, Plum Flower, and Liu He Praying Mantis styles.  Produced by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye of the Capital District Tai Chi and Kung Fu Association of New York,  29 West Dillenbeck Drive, Albany, NY 12203.  Website: Jiang's Tai Chi Videos.  


Sa Kwon: Chinese Bo Kata


Self-Defense with a Walking Stick.   By E. W. Barton-Wright.  1901.   50K.  Illustrations and commentary.   

 

 

Shaolin Cane



Bodhidharma's Damo Cane Kung Fu Form.  UTube Video, 2:01 Min. 


The Damo Cane. Shaolin Single Cane.  VCD instructional video.  The Damo Cane VCD for Self-Instruction.  Demonstrated and Explained by Feng Yan.  Language: Chinese and English.  Published by Henan Electronic Audio and Video Press.  ISRC CNF420100730.  The original creator of the Damo Cane was Cheng Tongshan, a well-known boxing master.   See also Shaolin Cane.


The Damo Cane.  Shaolin Kung Fu.  Demonstration and instruction by Sheng Yuefeng.  "The Damo Cane Kung Fu, also called the Shaolin single cane Kung Fu, is among the rare weapons in Shaolin Kung Fu forms. This form has been passed on to only a few persons by now. It is famous for weirdness and cleverness.  This program is based on the principles of higher starting point, authentic theories, and excellent works.  Hearty and generous impartation here is aimed at quick and effective acquirement by any learner."  Vendor 2.  Subtitles in English and Chinese, and instruction in English option.  Instructional VCD.  My copy had a bad hissing sound in the audio.  Instruction was a bit to fast.  This set is not the same as the Shaolin Bodhidharma's Cane as taught by Master Shi Deyang.  It appears to be a wushu competition form.  VSCL. 


Damo's T Cane.  UTube Video, 47 sec. 


Damo Gun - Bodhidharma's Short Staff.   Video, 1:26 min. 


Dragon Head Walking Cane of Shaolin Kung Fu.  Instructional DVD by Grandmaster Wing Lam.   


Gun, Staff, Cudgel, Long Staff, Eyebrow Staff of Shaolin 


Kung Fu Walking Stick Demonstration.  Video, 1:26 minute. 


Nine Province Short Staff (Shaolin).  Video, 1:06 min. 


Shaolin Bodhidharma's Cane  Demonstration and instruction by Master Shi Deyang.  Instructional DVD.  21 Posture/Movements Form.  "The Shaolin Bodhidharma's Cane is one of the rare weapons in Shaolin Wushu. It has a unique shape, just like a walking stick in an old man's hand. The movements in this routine are fierce, vigorous, simple, natural and poised. It cleverly and reasonably utilizes the techniques of attack and defense, so it can both attack and defend. This routine lays especially stress on the eyes techniques. When the hands move, the eyes follow them. If preserving in practicing this routine, you may able to improve the strength of hands."  Subtitles in English.  DVD, 45 Minutes.  Vendor 2Vendor 3.  VSCL. 


Shaolin Bodhidharma's Cane as taught by Master Shi Deyang.  List of 21 movements in 3 Sections; and, a bibliography. 


Shaolin Damo CaneDamo Cane also called Single Cane. It is said that it was named after Damo because high monk Damo always has a  cane with him. Its movements include Lun, Ya, Jia, Sao, & Pi.


Shaolin Damo Cane Demonstration.  UTube Video, 42 sec.  Demonstration by Sheng Yuefeng. 


Shaolin Cane   By Ted Mancusco. 


Shaolin Cane   Instructional VCD, in English and Chinese.  Instructor: Shi Yongkan.  


The Shaolin Cane: The Wooden Weapon of Kung Fu.  Instruction by Ted Mancuso.  Instructional DVD, 60 minutes.  Plum Publications, Santa Cruz, California, © 2005.  Available for purchase from both Plum Publications and Amazon.  "In this presentation by Ted Mancuso, he utilizes a traditional Shaolin cane set taught to him by one of his teachers, Lam Kwong Wing, to explore the very nature of weapons work. Introductory remarks bring new points to light about the usefulness of weapons work especially, with simple, easily available instruments. Among the topics covered, Mr. Mancuso discusses and demonstrates:  Basic strikes and their applicability to all weapons.  Grips and the "flexible hand" concept.  The traditional Northern Shaolin Boxing Cane form.  In-depth stepwise breakdowns of each section of this fast and mobile form.  Examples of applications, including running commentary explaining more than just the movements but the reasoning behind cane defenses.  According to this teacher, "Over the years students have come to me and say, - I'd like to learn the cane from you. When I ask why they always say something like, - For my father. He's getting old. At that point I have to explain to them that this is one of the most dynamic weapons sets in the entire Shaolin arsenal. After all, if you think about it handing a simple stick to a Kung Fu artists who can do sword, spear, whip and dagger is just like saying "anything goes." This is definitely not your grandfather's cane form."  In this instructional DVD, the lineage of this particular Shaolin Cane form is given as:  Ted Mancuso was taught by Lam Kwong Wing,  who was taught by Yim Shang Mo, who was taught by Gu Ru Shang,  who was taught by Yan Gi Wen, who was taught by Yan Di Gong, who was taught by Wang Bang Cai, who was taught by Gan Feng Chi, who was taught by Monk Zhao Yuan He Shang.  Read the short essay by Ted Mancuso on The Shaolin Cane.   VSCL.  I think this is an excellent instructional DVD.   


Shaolin Cane.  List of movements, instructions, notes, and references.  Prepared by Mike Garofalo.  Based on the Shaolin Cane Form as taught by Ted Mancuso.


"So yes, there probably was a time when monks were encouraged to use their humbled wooden instruments as a first and stolid line of defense. In the case of Shaolin there are many legends and much silliness about the Temple and its denizens. But one thing often admitted through the centuries is that the wooden weapon work of the Temple was at times of a very high caliber. It might have been the best in the world for its era. This is not unexpected. Quite often Wushu styles find a certain weapon that most perfectly characterizes their brand of skill. Pi Gua is famous for its saber work. Ba Ji for its spear. Praying Mantis loves the two-handed straight sword. Shaolin at one time boasted an astounding 200 stick sets. And that's quite possibly true considering the amount of information coming into the Temple.  These wooden weapons varied greatly. Some were eight feet or more up to 12 feet. Many were the famous "eyebrow" length. Then there were short sticks often called whips or cudgels. And, of course, there were canes.  Basically, the Da Mo Cane - the most famous cane set from the Temple - utilizes a square necked instrument. (There are actually a number of sets all claiming to be called after DaMo the Buddhist founder ) The other significant variation of the Shaolin Cane is its curve necked brother. There are many types: Dragon Cane, Iron Cane, but the curved and the straight are the major designations. The Shaolin Cane we present does not distinguish between the two but can easily use either version."
The Cane of Shaolin.  By Ted Mancuso. 


Shaolin Encyclopedia 


"Shaolin Gun is the most famous weapon. It was the earliest weapon of Shalin Kung Fu. During Ming Dynasty, Shaolin Monks took part in several battles with stick weapon to fight with rebellion group. From then on, Shaolin stick started to become famous. The Shaolin stick movements was passed on form generation to generation with the strict firmly style. The book “Shaolin Stick Movements of Buddhism” was a famous sutra of Shaolin Stick. The most typical sticks movements as bellow: Shaolin Feng & Huo Gun (Wind & Fire Stick), Shaolin Yinshou Gun (Negative Hand Stick), Shaolin Duan Gun (Short Stick), Shaolin Da Ye Cha Gun (Big Rough Stick), Shaolin Shao Huo Gun (Cook-firing Stick), Shaolin Yuan Hou Gun (Monkey Stick)."
China Wushu


Shaolin Short Stick.  Instructional VCD from Plum Publications.  "A short form of 33 movements. Somewhat like a Plum Blossom form hitting the cardinal angles. Some tips on application given by ShihFu Liu Zhi-Hai himself. Quick short moves."

 
Shaolin Staff, Gun, Stick, Long Staff, Cudgel, Eyebrow Staff


Shaolin Tai Tzu Style Short Stick.  Instructional VCD, 60 minutes, Chinese Only.  This routine combines the staff methods of 5 Yin Hands and 7 Yang Hands.


Thunder Stick Form developed by Chen Pan-Ling and as taught by Chen Yun-Ching.  24 Movements.  List of Names. 


Tongbiquan Wushu: Master Huang Baoshan (1905-1998)  Stick of LuDa, Nine Rings Zen Cane, Old Man Guards the Field Stick. 


Traditional Dat Mo Stick Martial Arts.  Master Deng Er Qian.  List of 48 movements in English and Chinese.  "It is believed that the Traditional Dat Mo Stick Form comes from the Shaolin Temple and predates the burning of the temple in Henan. The Dat Mo Stick has two lineage branches: 1. Shaolin Si, 2. Tagou School. It is also believed that there are two sections of the Dat Mo Stick, Section 1 - composed of 40 forms and Section 2 - composed of 48 forms. The monks usually performed the two sections together as one set."  There is an instructional DVD on this Dat Mo Cane/Stick Form, titled "In the Shadow of the Masters" by Bob Fermor, available from the Guan Yu International Academy of Martial Arts.  [The length of the cane in this form is somewhat longer than a hooked cane, from the floor to under the armpit - what we might call a "crutch."  The Shaolin Temple at Henan was burned three times: 574 CE, 1644, and 1927; and was vandalized and damaged during the Maoist Cultural Revolution in the 1960's.] 

 

 

                  



 


Special Taoist Taiji Stick and Ruler Qigong.  By Feng Zhiqiang.  Compiled by Wang Fengming.  205 pages in English, 127 pages in Chinese.  


Staff Fighting Forms (Jian Dan Gun Fa Dui Lian, 簡單棍法對練)


Staff Spinning Techniques and Fire Spinning 


Staff (Stick) - Wikipedia 


Stick and Pole Weapons.  By George Hernandez.  80Kb.  An informative and detailed overview of this type of weapons. 


Stick Fighting.   By Masaaki Hatsumi and Quintin Chambers.  Kodansha International, 1981.  ISBN: 0870114751. 


Stick Fighting Google Video Search  


Stick Fighting - Wikipedia


Stick Fighting World Forum 


Staff (Stick) - Wikipedia 


Stav - Runic Martial Arts 


Stav Rune Breathing Walking Stick Form


Strikes with the Stick and Cane.  60 strikes are described by Tom Lang.  87Kb, PDF. 


Tai Chi Chuan, Taijiquan - Cane, Short Staff


Taiji Ruler  Exercise techniques using a short stick (Taiji Bang) and walking movements.  Popular amongst Chen Taijiquan practitioners. 


"Taiji Staff (太極棍, Taiji Gun). The staff is the first long weapon in Taiji. The principles of feeling (listening), following, sticking, and adhering remain the key to the training. Taiji staff also has two-person sticking training."


Taiji Sticking Staff  This webpage discusses use of the long staff and includes descriptions and photographs of a two person routine. 


Techniques for the Cane and Short Staff 


Tchoung Ta-Tchen Walking Stick Form.  35 movements.  A lively taijiquan walking stick or cane form


Thunder Stick Form developed by Chen Pan-Ling and as taught by Chen Yun-Ching.

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 


Tiger Tail Short Staff: List of Movements and Notes.  Names of each of the 48 postures in this Wudang Mountain Taoist Short Staff Form.  The "Short Staff" is sometimes called a "13 Hands Staff" or "Whip Staff."  Prepared by Michael P. Garofalo, M.S..  March 2009.  Names are based on the teaching by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye in his instructional DVD, Wu Dang Tiger Tail Short Staff.


Toma Modern Arnis.  Master Thomas (Toma) Rosenzweig.  Home of Modern Arnis in Los Angeles.  Phone: 1-818-339-4051. 


Traditional Filipino Weapons, 847 Hamilton Ave., Waterbury, CT 06706.  203 596 9073.  Sandata4UsAll@aol.com.  Recommended by Master Rosenzweig. 


Valley Spirit Taijiquan Cane Links 


Vendors, Retailers, and Manufacturers of Short Staffs, Canes, Walking Sticks   


Walking Stick Form of Master Chen Pan-Ling.  A walking stick form was taught by Chen Pan-Ling (1892-1967.)  "This form was brought to the U.S. at various times by different martial artists; as such you'll find a few unique flavors of it. The form is practiced in four lines and most count it at around 25-33 postures. Interestingly, since broadsword (saber) moves influenced the form greatly, you can also perform the sequence with a broadsword rather than a stick. This version was brought to the United States at different times by Meng Shan-Fu, Kai Sung, Chen Yun-Ching (1939-), and students of Wang Fu-Lai such as Hiromi Hangai Johnson (www.hiromitaichi.org). Each had their own technique and emphasis. As such, the flavor differs slightly with each practitioner although the moves are basically the same.  Chen Yun-Ching, who is a son of Chen Pan-Ling, calls this form "Thunder Stick" and has a DVD available of it through his student James Sumarac and from Plum Publications."  This webpage includes six embedded UTube videos. Demonstrations:  Video 1 by Dmitry Deitch, Video 2 by Binyamin.  According to Marnix Wells, Chen Pan-ling taught Wang Shu Chin the 24 movement walking stick form; but others disagree.  "Just my two cents on the walking stick form - it is listed in Mr. Chen's bagua book and several of his other books as a Shaolin form. It is not in the "self invented" section of the forms listing. I assume Chen Pan-Ling learned this form from his father. I have seen Mr. Chen Yun Ching do it a couple of times. It is pretty short."  Discussion.  The walking stick form taught by Master Chen Pan-Ling has been called a Shaolin, Xing Yi, and Tai Chi stick form by different knowledgeable persons. 
Vendor: Plum Publications. "In regards to the short stick, when Chen Yun-Ching was here in the States in 2006, he said that his father developed this form (Thunder Stick) in response to villagers that were having problems with stray dogs and bandits. The villagers asked CPL if he could teach them a simple weapon defense form. CPL extracted simple movements from his Shaolin knowledge base and then taught this form so that the villagers could use canes to defend themselves. Besides using a short staff, Chen Yun-Ching actually demonstrated the form with a cane with the hook handle and was very impressive." - Tom Karls.  二十四棍(鐵) 24 stick (walking stick).  Hal Mosher, an authorized Chen Pan Ling system teacher, told me that there are no names for the movements in this form. 


The Walking Stick Method of Self-Defense.  By H. G. Lang, 1923.  Published by Kirk Lawson.  118 pages. 


Walking Stick Retailers and Manufacturers


Wang Shujin (1904-1981)  According to Kent Howard, Wang Shujin always carried a cane or walking stick with him, and he could use it effectively in martial applications.  Shifu Howard said Wang Shujin practiced a cane form taught to him by Chen Pan-Ling (Thunder Stick) and a Xing Yi cane form.   


Weapon Symmetry 


Wendy's Walking Sticks and Cane Links


Western China Staff Sets: 
30 VCD's from Plum Publications.  "The Western region of China is often associated with Taoism and the interchange of religious ideas from India. This style has a huge amount of stick work. Single stick, double jointed staff (Big Sweeper), double short sticks (Nunchaku): all are here with an unusual number of high quality sets.  Here we have a variety of performers all giving renditions of staff skills. This style has a huge repertoire of staff work including single short, single long, double short, big sweeper and more. There are not only a lot of sets but the typical eyebrow length staff is used in a variety of ways including reverse grip. Along with Shaolin, which for a time was probably the greatest staff style in the world—boasting 200 sets— the Western Staff is a truly masterful selection of forms." Bian, Tan Bian (Single Whip, Whip Like) forms, and Gun forms. 

 

Western Staff Style Husk Staff.  Cai Zhi Zhong performs Ku Zi Gun.  "This is a three VCD set with no forms on it. Instead there are many exercises. This is a great series for people who want to really practice stick arts. Each section contains a few moves done symmetrically with a refrain, something like the staff version of a short Tan Tui set. Each section is named, performed, repeated and then broken down. Great for instructors and students who want practice patterns. This rare art was once the property of the Gao family, Gansu, and has only recently come forward.  Excellent routines."  Plum Publications.  VSCL. 


'Nanquan, beitui
Dongqiang xigun
'
'Fists in the south, legs in the north
Spears in the east, sticks in the west'


Workshops, Seminars, Lectures, Demonstrations on the Cane, Walking Stick, Jo, Short Staff


Xing Yi (Hsing I) Staff.    Video and List of Postures

 

Videos Online about the Short Staff in Other Martial Arts Styles

Max Andranov's Shinai Wars 

Black Tiger Stick Form.  UTube, 1:10 minutes. 

French Stick Fighting (Canne de Combat) Online Video.   2:26 minutes. 

French Stick Fighting (Canne de Combat) Online Video.  3:03 minutes. 

Wushu Stick Form.  UTube, 3:46 minutes.

Wushu Stick Form.  UTube, 2:51 minutes.

Whip Staff Cudgel.  UTube, 1:58 min. 

Whip Staff (Bian Gan).  UTube, 3:59 min. 

Xing Yi Short Staff Form.  UTube, 1:34 minutes. 

Xiao Yao Style Cane Form.  VCD, 60 minutes.  Plum Publications.

 

 

 

Return to the Index at the Top of This Webpage

 

 

  
  

Fitness and Walking
The Use of Canes, Sticks, and Weighted Staffs in Conditioning Exercises

 

"Besides being a most useful and practical accomplishment, this new art of self-defense
with a walking-stick is to be recommended as a most exhilarating and graceful exercise."
-  E. W. Barton-Wright, 1901

 

Body Bar and BOSU Training DVD 


Body Bar Deep Definition DVD.  Presenters:  Rob Glick, Carey Bond, and Lashaun Dale.  DVD, 130 minutes. 


Body Bar: 133 Moves for Full Body Fitness.  By Gregg Cook and Fatima d'Almeida-Cook.  159 pages.  VSCL. 


Cane Exercises with a Stretch Band.    By Master Thomas (Toma) Rosenzweig


Cane Research Project at Valley Spirit Taijiquan  



Cane - Wikipedia


Cloud Hands Blog 


Danda Yoga.  Dr. Maun Gyi. 


Exercises with a Cane - Google Search


The Exercise System of the Cane.  Instructional DVD, 45 minutes.  Developed by Grandmaster Mark Shuey, Sr., founder of Cane Masters.  Cane Masters Instructional Video Series, Volume 1.  "The material in this video is based solely on the physical fitness aspects of using the cane either with our without a resistance band. You will see not only the proper technique of performing each exercise, but also a graphic representation of that portion of the body being stressed.  We have had many doctors, chiropractors, and physical therapists report that they have patients who have benefited greatly from this program."


Fan, Tai Chi Fan, Kung Fu Fan, Fan Dance


Hiking Poles and Walking Sticks  An interesting collection of short articles about


Martial Arts Techniques for the Cane and Short Staff.  By Michael P. Garofalo, M.S., Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Red Bluff, California.  January 2009.  100Kb.  Includes Strikes - Two Hands, Strikes - One Hand, Blocks - Two Hands, Blocks - One Hand, Sweeps, Pull Downs, Chops, Jabs, Pokes, Punches.  The document provides a bibliography, links, and resources.  The document includes brief descriptions for each short staff and/or cane technique. 


Spirit of the Staff 


The Staff: Bibliography, Links, Quotes, Notes, Lessons 


Tai Chi Chuan, Taijiquan - Cane, Short Staff


Tai Chi Fan, Kung Fu Fan, Fan Dance

 



Tai Chi Ruler, Bang, Hand Stick Practice


Using the French Cane for Fitness.  By Frederic Morin. 


Vendors, Retailers, and Manufacturers of Short Staffs, Canes, Walking Sticks   


Versa Bar: Weighted Bars, 4' long (12lb, 18lb, 24lb) 


Walking and Tai Chi Chuan


Walking - Quotations   

 

 

Walking Stick and Cane Books 


Walking Staff Related Articles and Book Excerpts 


Walking Stick Retailers and Manufacturers


The Walking Stick: Hiking and Walking - Sticks, Poles and Staff   


Walking Stick History   


Walking Stick Method of Self Defense.   A twelve part manual created by Mr. H.G. Lang who 
was a British Officer of the Indian Police. It was written in 1923.  PDF format.  


Walking Stick Shop


Walking Sticks: Catalog and Links    The Sei Do Kai Catalog.  


Walking Stick - Wikipedia


Wampanoag Carved Walking Sticks    


The Ways of Walking: Quotes, Poems, Sayings, and Lore 


Weight Training with the Staff:  You can always use a body bar or iron staff. 

 

 

Return to the Index at the Top of This Webpage

 

 

  
  

 

Sierra Nevada, California
Rock Creek Basin, Mt. Starr (12,870'), 1985
Mike Garofalo, a hiker, who agrees with the late Colin Fletcher's praise for the walking staff:

"Although the vast majority of walkers never even think of using a walking staff, I unhesitatingly include it among the foundations of the house that travels on my back.  I still take my staff along almost as automatically as I take my pack.  It is a third leg to me - and much more besides.  On smooth surfaces the staff helps maintain an easy rhythm to my walking and gives me something to lean on when I stop to stand and stare.  Over rough going of any kind, from tussocky grass to pockety rock, and also in a high wind, it converts me when I am heavily laded from an insecure biped to a confident triped.  ...  It may well be, too, that the staff also gives me a false but subconsciously comforting feeling that I am not after all completely defenseless against attack by such enemies as snakes, bears and men."
-  Colin Fletcher, The Complete Walker III, 1984, p. 78

 


  

 

 

 

Quotations
Short Staff: Jo, Walking Stick, Cane, Zhang
Jodo, Aikijo, Jojutsu, Gun Quan, Zhang Quan

Facts, Legends, Lore, Literature

The Magical Staff:  Quotes, Legends, Lore

 

 

"The craft of cutting a walking stick no doubt stretches back through time to when Man first walked on two legs. At first simple tools, they would quickly have come to be carved and decorated. The known history of walking sticks however, begins much later in  mid fifteenth century Europe when sticks have been found ornately carved with historical events. The term 'cane' was introduced in Britain during the reign of King Henry VIII to refer to sticks made of imported exotic woods. Today the word continues to refer to the use of exotic woods as well as  to mean a stick with a simple taper and without a curved handle."
Phoenix Walking Stick Company

 

 

"Many backpackers never consider a walking stick or staff, yet for me this is as essential as a sleeping bag or a pair of boots. It was not always so; I backpacked for a decade and more without using a staff. Then I started using Nordic skis in winter and spring, and I discovered that when I had to carry the skis on my pack, using the poles improved my balance. Initially I began picking up stout sticks to help me climb steep inclines and ford streams. I realized that having a staff with me all the time could be useful when, on a week-long, early summer walk in Iceland, I couldn't find a stick to pick up-Iceland is virtually treeless. Shifting, slippery pebble and gravel beds mixed with large areas of soft, thawing snow and deep rivers made for a difficult walk, which a staff would have eased. Without one, I was constantly off balance, slipping and stumbling along.  The main reason to use a staff is for balance on rough terrain and river crossings. Staff in hand I can negotiate steep scree slopes, boulder fields, and tussocky moorland with confidence, even with the heaviest load. But a staff has even more uses. On level ground and good trails it helps maintain a walking rhythm. When crossing boggy ground or snow, it can probe for hidden rocks and deep spots as well as provide support. It can hold back bushes, barbed wire, stinging plants, and other trail obstructions. Perhaps most useful of all, it saves energy. I am convinced it takes some weight off my feet, particularly when I lean heavily on it as I climb steep slopes. The German mountaineering equipment company, Edelrid, quotes "mountain doctor" Gottfried Neureuther as saying that "each place ski pole takes between 5 and 8 kilograms weight off the lower part of the body, which is equivalent to a total of 13 tons during a one-hour walk on flat ground and an amazing 34 tons total load reduction when walking downhill... ."
-  Chris Townsend, Backpacker's Handbook, 1963

 

 

"Many people do not like the walking cane for Self-defense because it does not go along with their age, attire or, they simply do not want to be associated with someone who may be disabled. They do not wish to have the stigma that is often associated with the cane.  There is a strength in that appearance. The strong appearing to be weak might be all the edge you need in a lot of physical confrontations. That’s a "Combat Ruse." A young attacker who is strong might make the incredible mistake of thinking you are easy prey, to find out all too late that you’re not.  The Cane gives even more reach than the average telescoping baton in some cases and is legal in more areas than that weapon.  Perhaps the greatest strength of all is in the presentation. The Cane is already "drawn." You can strike immediately with it. There is an old saying in Gun Circles, "The fastest draw is to have the gun in your hand when the trouble starts." This applies to the knife as well, and the stick. The strength of the Cane is, it is a Cane! It’s not a gun or a knife, it is already out in the open and you can strike instantly with it."
-   Don Rearic, The Beginner's Guide to the Cane

 

 

"The jo, like its larger sibling the Bo (long staff), was never an effective weapon on the battlefield in comparison to the sword, spear and bow just to name a few. Although the jo and most other staves could be used to lethal effect when thrust at vital points of the body, but when faced with a fully armoured opponent those vital points would in most cases be covered. As a result there were very few ryu that were dedicated to the staff-arts in the warring era since other more effective weapons were available. There are several ryu that include jo-techniques in it's system. One example is the jo-tradition found in the koryu art Tendo-ryu Naginatajutsu, founded in 1582. In Tendo-ryu, which uses the Naginata as the primary weapon, there are techniques with the jo that simulates a scenario where the naginata has been cut in two and the wielder has to defend himself with the staff-portion only. With the onset of peace with the start of the Edo-period (1603-1867), the conflicts with heavy armoured warriors became a thing of the past. In this era, the jo-art would come into its own against non-armoured samurai and other opponents.  Various other martial arts also include elements of jojutsu not necessarily related to Shinto Muso-ryu. One of the most famous promoter of the jo outside of Shinto Muso-ryu in modern times, and indeed in the martial arts community as a whole, was the founder of Aikido, Morihei Ueshiba. Ueshiba trained in a variety of ryu including Yagyu swordsmanship, but is not known to have trained in Shinto Muso-ryu. It is generally believed that Ueshiba used his training in sojutsu (spear) to create a set of techniques for the jo. (Ueshiba also used the longstaff bo to perform the same techniques.)"
-   Shinto Muso-Ryu - Wikipedia

 

 

"The bokken (wooden staff-sword) was usually used as a training tool and simulated the length of a sword.  Miyamoto Musashi (author of the book of strategy "Go Rin No Sho" - "A Book of Five Rings") is considered by many to be the greatest swordsman in Japanese history.  Many of his duels were won using only a bokken.  He believed that fencing technique transcended the weapon used.   ...   Muso Gonnosuke was defeated by Miyamoto Musashi and allowed to live. He later developed the jo. The wooden jo is around 4 feet long.  This length advantage over the sword allowed Muso Gonnosuke to defeat Miyamoto Musashi in a rematch. He spared Musashi's life but that is the only known defeat suffered by Musashi. The jo and bokken are two of the weapons used in aikido to commemorate that battle."
-   Gabrielle's Staff Techniques   By Donald Plunkett.  13K

 

 

 

 

"Gonnosuke withdrew to a Shinto shrine at Mount Homan in Chikuzen province, (modern-day, Fukuoka Prefecture), where he would practice daily in perfecting his swordsmanship, praying and performing shinto purifying rituals for 37 days. It is also said, however, that he spent several years on the road studying other martial arts in various dojos until he ended up in the Shinto-shrine. After one of his regular (exhausting) training sessions he collapsed from fatigue and reputably had a vision of a divine being in the form of a child, saying to Gonnosuke: "know the solar plexus [of your opponent] with a round stick". In another version he had the vision in a dream late at night. He took it upon himself to create the jo deliberatly longer than the average katana of the day, 128 cm as opposed to the swords total length of approx. 100 cm, and use that length to his advantage in a fight. Gonnosuke, drawing on his own considerable experience with the spear, longstaff, naginata and sword, also devised a set of five jo-techniques for use to counter and defeat a swordsman. Arguably he also developed techniques to specifically hinder Musashi's trade-mark x-block.

As the tradition goes, Gonnosuke, now armed with the jo, would again face Musashi in a duel and defeat him through the use of the superior length of the jo to keep Musashis swords out of range of Gonnosuke and thus hinder him from using the X-shaped technique effectively. Gonnosuke had Musashi at his mercy but let him live as a way of returning the favour granted in the first duel. Musashi, who was said to be impressed by how Gonnosuke had learned humility from his earlier arrogance and his new skills, made friends with Gonnosuke, and they would be each other companions during their travels.  The claim that Musashi was defeated, (at all), is still a matter of debate and is generally taken with a grain of salt."
-   Muso Gonnosuke Katsuyoshi (circa 1600), Wikipedia Article 

 

 

"In Zen Buddhism, the keisaku (Japanese: 警策; kyôsaku in the Soto school) is a flat wooden stick or slat used during periods of meditation to remedy sleepiness or lapses of concentration. This is accomplished through a strike or series of strikes, usually administered on the meditator's back and shoulders in the muscular area between the shoulder blades and the spine. The keisaku itself is thin and somewhat flexible; strikes with it, though they may cause momentary sting if performed vigorously, are not injurious.  The word "Keisaku" may be translated as "warning stick", and is wielded by the jikijitsu. "Encouragement stick" is a common translation for "kyosaku". In Soto Zen, the Kyosaku is always administered at the request of the meditator, by way of bowing one's head and putting the palms together in gassho, and then exposing each shoulder to be struck in turn. In Rinzai Zen, the stick is requested in the same manner, but may also be used at the discretion of the Ino, the one in charge of the meditation hall. Even in such cases, it is not considered a punishment, but a compassionate means to reinvigorate and awaken the meditator who may be tired from many sessions of zazen."
-  Keisaku, Zen Encouragement Stick 

 

 

"Seng Chou, another famous martial arts monk, is well known in the history of Shaolin Temple. He was one of the most knowledgeable and respected monks and a great martial artist. He later became a great abbot traveling throughout the country spreading the scripture of Buddhism. He had thousands of disciples. Once, Seng Chou was walking in the forest and saw two tigers were in a fierce fight. He attacked the tigers with a cane. The tigers got angry with him. His great fighting sensibility, his light Qigong and his endurance finally wore the tigers out. He broke the tiger's fight up and gave the tigers a good lesson by defeating them both, though he broke his cane."
History of Shaolin

 

 

"The stick is the ancestral weapon. Even our closest cousins – chimpanzees and bonobos – have been observed fighting with sticks.  There are many kinds of fighting sticks. In English, stick, staff, bat, baton, rod, cudgel and truncheon; in Chinese, gun, bang, chang and more.  In Shaolin weapons training, mastery of the short stick is the foundation of sword technique. Mastery of the long staff is the foundation of pole-arm technique. In our school specifically,

 

"French Cane Fencing (French canne): The art of defending oneself with a walking stick, developed in France by the 16th century but little practiced after the beginning of the 20th. In cane fencing, unlike singlestick, the thrust was as important as the cut. Also, possessing no handguard, the cane was much more maneuverable than the singlestick. Cuts with the cane were usually given after one or more flourishes, or moulinets (French: “twirls”), which served to confuse an assailant and lent momentum to the cut. The thrusts were similar to those in foil fencing but often carried out with both hands grasping the stick, giving greater force and enabling the cane to be used at very close quarters. French canes were made of tough wood, about three feet (one metre) long, and tapered toward the point. In practice matches, masks, gloves, padded vests, and shin guards were worn. Today, organized cane fighting is overseen by the Comité National de Canne de Combat et Bâton, in Paris."
-   French Cane Fencing

 

 

"I have no fitting gifts to give you at our parting ... But take these staves.  They may be of service to those who walk or climb in the wild."
-   J. R. R. Tolkien, The Two Towers

 

 

"Weapons such as the La Baton, a seven foot staff rod approximately one inch diameter were commonly practice by Savate practitioners. It was particular famous among hillside and farming communities of France and Spain. There is no particularly evidence on where the La Baton came from but it has been suggested that this weapon came into existence by farmers and sheep herders tools such as walking staffs and garden tools.  The more famous and popular weapon incorporated by Savate is the La Canne. A 1/2 inch diameter flexible stick approximately 36 inches in length. Savate combines traditional fencing motions along with kicking techniques when wielding this dowel shape stick at the opponent. This weapon is fast and flexible making it a fierce companion."
Boxe Francaise Savate   

 

 

Yosemite National Park, California
Looking east from North Dome (7,450 feet) towards Half Dome
Mike Garofalo, Hiker, 2006

 

 

Chinese Chan Buddhist Master Shoushan held up a bamboo staff before a group and said, "If you call it a bamboo staff, you are clinging.  If you do not call it a bamboo staff, you are ignoring.  So tell me, what do you call it?"  - Wumenquan, # 43.  

 

"Andrew Chase Cunningham was a fencing and self defense instructor attached to the US Navy during the early years of the 1900s. In 1912 he produced a booklet on practical self defense with a walking stick, under the title "The Cane as a Weapon".  A PDF of that booklet has been floating around the Net for years, but never attracted much attention, probably because Cunningham only included 12 photographs of himself in various "attitudes of defense" with his cane, as an appendix at the end of the booklet. The rest of the booklet consists of large chunks of text, and although it's reasonably well-written, without pictures it's difficult to follow what he's saying.  An expanded re-print became available in 2006, including all of the original text and pictures plus a new introduction and 170 new photographs of the system in action, which make it much easier to follow the technical instructions.  Cunningham's system was unusual in that it didn't just treat the cane as a substitute sword. Acknowledging the risk of an attacker grabbing the cane if it was held in an orthodox fencing position, Cunningham advocates three guard positions. In two of them the cane is held low in the right hand with the left hand up in a boxing defense position, and the third guard is a double-handed grip on the weapon.  Targets, defenses and attacks are sensibly chosen. Cunningham was well aware of the "de-fanging the snake" principle and many of his parries are actually counter-strikes to the attacker's hand or wrist, usually followed by a combination of cuts and thrusts to the face, throat or solar plexus area. He also advocates striking to the attacker's knee/shin region while sidestepping or retreating away from the initial attack.  Much attention is paid to using the cane ambidextrously, quickly shifting grips from one hand to the other, and to the different types of striking techniques (snapping cuts, half-arms cuts, circular cuts, etc.) The system is versatile enough to cope with attacks from an opponent wielding a stick, knife or other short weapon, or attacking with punches or kicks.  He offers some sensible advice about how to fend off a group of attackers, and even discusses how to use a bowler hat as a "shield" in the off-hand and how to fight off an attack by a dog."
Devon

 

"A staff is a large, thick stick or stick-shaped object used to help with walking, as a status symbol, as a component of traditional barrel making, or as a weapon.  The plural form of staff was originally staves (compare wolf, wolves and knife, knives), and in British and International English this is still preferred. In American English the usual plural form has become staffs, except in fantasy literature. The old English plural form staves collectively describes the wooden sticks bound by iron hoops to form traditional wooden barrels.  Examples of staffs in Western Martial Arts include the English quarterstaff and the French bâton, and there are many martial arts, such as Italian Liu-bo, based around such staff-like weapons.  The Indian Silambam staff has been used as a weapon since at least the 2nd century, evident from references in ancient Sangam literature of the time. The martial art associated with the Silambam staff is also known as Silambam. This staff was later incorporated in several Malay martial arts such as Silat."
-   Wikipedia - Staff (Stick)

 

The Magical Staff:  Quotes, Legends, Lore

 

"The walking stick or "cane" has long held a place in man's history, its roots leading back to the "big stick" wielded by prehistoric man as a weapon of both self-defense and aggression.  Civilized man carried on the tradition. Ancient Egyptians and Greeks represented their rulers and gods carrying staffs which symbolized authority. These staffs became the scepters of kings during the Middle Ages.  The staff's role as an aid to travel was exemplified in the hands of pilgrims and shepherds. These wooden staffs usually were heavy sticks about 5 feet long. Very often the tops of the sticks held secret compartments for carrying valuables or for smuggling contraband. Records show that silkworm eggs were smuggled into Europe via a hollow staff. The first tulip bulb introduced into Holland also was reported to have made a similar entrance."
The Walking Stick in History, Vigo County Historical Society

 

 

"Traditional European systems of stick fighting included a wide variety of methods of quarterstaff combat, which were detailed in numerous manuscripts written by masters-at-arms. Many of these methods became extinct but others adapted and survived as folk-sports and self defence systems.  Examples include Portugal's Jogo do Pau, France's bâton français and Italy's scherma di bastone. Giuseppe Cerri's 1854 manual Trattato teorico e pratico della scherma di bastone is influenced by masters of the Italian school of swordsmanship, Achille Marozzo and perhaps Francesco Alfieri.  The French system of la canne is still practised as a competitive sport. A self-defense adaptation of la canne developed by Swiss master-at-arms Pierre Vigny in the early 1900s has been revived as part of the
curriculum of Bartitsu.  British stick fighting, known as single stick or cudgels, was a popular pastime in the UK from the 18th to the early 20th century, when it was included in the Olympic Games.  Although interest in the art declined, a few fencing coaches continued to train with the stick and competitions in this style of stick fighting was re-introduced into the Royal Navy in the 1980s by commander Locker Madden. The art continues to gain a small following amongst the martial art community in the UK, Australia, Canada and the US.  Some of the most advanced stick fighting systems come from the Philippines. Filipino martial arts are known worldwide for their combat stick fighting systems. The weapons vary in design, size, weight, materials and methodology. Baston or olisi, eskrima sticks, are traditionally crafted from rattan or kamagong."
-   Stick Fighting - Wikipedia

 

 

"The staff makes the body a little lighter,
If used the way it's supposed to be used,
And makes moving through the forest brighter
If skill and technique is not abused.

"Three points of contact" is the defensive shield
That can cut down on many a fall,
When a stick, limb, or vine is suddenly revealed
And a spill down a hill might call.

When heavy undergrowth does appear
And penetration is the thing to do,
The staff is the perfect tool to have near
To create a path you can go through."
-  James Ebb Huggins, Jr., The Walking Staff

 

 

"The correct use of the bo (sai, tonfa, kama, naginata, sword) can produce a stimulating and practical means of "extension" training. It offers a means of martial arts training and discipline. Weapons training teaches the meaning of control, timing, distance, and flexibility as one unit. The practitioner is required to possess speed, coordination, strength, and endurance in utilizing the respective weapons."
History of the Bo Staff

 

"Another advantage of carrying a cane is that criminals size up everyone they see for victim potential and when you carry a cane, you look armed and dangerous because they are thinking of such things. They will (maybe) find a less prepared victim. At the same time, to the general public you look totally normal and civilized, even elegant. If you have already trained in cane use and feel competent to defend yourself, this will show in your bearing and body language, which may deter a criminal attack.   But of course, if you never learn how to hit hard, nor develop your hitting power, if you never learn how to keep an aggressor from taking it away from you, your self defense capability is severely impaired. Why wait until you need a cane as a mobility aid to start training in its use for self defense? If you wait until you need a cane to learn its various uses and the self defense aspects, you may not be able to achieve your full potential of skill and will lose out on the many fitness benefits available to the practicing student. Any normally healthy 50+ year old can learn a system for self defense with the cane and get hours of relaxing exercise while learning a skill that will help with your peace of mind when out of your normal experience.  If you want just self defense, look for a teacher that has stripped the art out of the style. If you can't learn the "how to" of a move in three tries, it is probably no good for self defense. If you can't perfect it in ten practice tries, it is also probably too complicated to be practical. If you want an extended exercise system with a lot of exercise and a life time of learning, consider taking a martial art that teaches cane work or even as an add-on to the cane work you have found."
-  Ted Truscott, The Fighting Cane

 

"The traditional Yang style actually doesn't have many weapons. In the main they are divided into two groups: long and short handled weapons. The short weapons are the 67-move sword and 13-move sabre. Now the long weapons. We used to include the long spear (or Yang style 13-move spear), but later for safety reasons removed the spear head so that it became a long staff. The techniques for the staff remain the same as the original spear form. Later the long staff practice turned mainly into a way of training to emit energy (fa1 jing4). This is usually referred to as dou3 gan1 or 'shivering staff'."
Master Yang Jun

 

"Shaolin Kung Fu is famous for its staff, which has become an unofficial symbol of Shaolin weapons.  Philosophically, the Shaolin staff manifests what Shaolin Kung Fu stands for: simple yet versatile, hardy yet compassionate.  It is difficult to find a weapon simpler than a staff, yet the techniques for other weapons, like the spear, halberd, mace, battle axe, scimitar, sword or dagger, are all incorporated in staff training.  A staff, like a Shaolin disciple, is made for all seasons.  And though it is hardy, its combat application is a hallmark of compassion, since it is devoid of any sharp or pointed parts which can maim or kill an opponent."
-   Wong Kiew Kit, The Complete Book of Tai Chi Chuan, 1996, p. 280.  

 

 

 

"At the turn of the century, a western European stick fighting system was enjoying the same degree of popularity as Eastern martial arts are today: The French system of La Canne ('The Cane') could be taught as a competitive sport, as a method of self-defense, or as a combination of both. There are numerous local and regional variants of the system in its early days, involving different striking patterns and body movements.  Many of these depended upon the respective teacher's background and other combative systems, such as foil, sabre, broadsword (even epee play) frequently being supplemented with techniques taken from French boxing, wrestling and even ballet. In the last decades of the 19th century, one La Canne instructor gained notoriety for his system's combative effectiveness. His name was Pierre Vigny. Little is known about his life. That which we know is derived mainly from a (very rare) manual adapted and published by the Superintendent of Agency Police in Kathiwar, Lang, for the police constabularies of India. Lang had studied Vigny's system in Europe and taught it to numerous Indian policemen and instructors until it became the standard system for Indian police stick fighting, displaying lathi and Salambam in the process. Vigny developed his system from the cutting methods of sabre and broadsword, combined with his hands, from the notorious street thugs of Paris and encounters with hostile Apaches. He writes that during these encounters, he was able to ward off and defeat several Apaches using only his lightweight umbrella in a sword-like fashion. In La Canne, Vigny prefers a lightweight cane with a heavier end to use as a striking tool - if the cane was made from Malacca or ash root with a natural thickening or branch knot at the end. The rationale for his choice of a lightweight weapon: He wished all blows to come from a whipping turn of the wrist, believing that only a certain weight was required to hit if you attacked body parts that are particularly vulnerable. He thus held that good speed generated power. Vigny's system did not include the numerous spins and acrobatic manoeuvres used in the modern sport of La Canne, nor did he advocate shifting the stick from one hand to the other in combat. The footwork and body positions of his system varied, depending on the particular technique he was using. Patterns resemble those of prizefighting and fencing. At the turn of the century, Vigny immigrated to New Orleans, where his system became rather popular. It is rumoured that Teddy Roosevelt was tutored in the Vigny system."
La Canne

 

 

    "Jogo do Pau ("the stick game," or "stick-fencing") is a fighting style employing a simple staff, approximately the height of the player, in techniques of attack and defense. In the generic sense, stick fighting has been practiced throughout the world and was refined as a practical technique in some European countries such as Portugal, France. England (quarter-staff) and also in the majority of Eastern countries, including India, China, Japan (bo-jutsu), Thailand, Vietnam and Afghanistan. In the latter nations that still preserve their medieval customs of combat, any tourist who ventures a little into the interior of the country can witness bloody individual combats, including inter-clan rivalries fought with staves.

    Human beings have always had to fight to survive and humans have always employed tools. The simple stick was almost certainly among the first tools to be turned to martial purposes, as an instrument of attack and defense against animals. As societies evolved from the nomadic hunting and food gathering stage, conflicts arose; competition over resources, etc. boiled over into personal combat, and people created series of specific movements, attacks and defenses, with their utilitarian sticks. The specific nature of these actions depended on geographic conditions, as well as cultural and other factors. This new fighting technique varied not only by country, but also by the length of the stick or staff most commonly employed. Few stick fighting methods were developed for staves over two meters in length.

    Afghan and Indian forms of stick-fighting included training and combat with a wide variety of wooden weapons, of different lengths and timbers. Other forms, such as the English quarter-staff, probably so-called because the fighter gripped his weapon with his right hand one-quarter of the way along its length, employed robust hardwood staves. The quarter-staff was two meters long, requiring management with both hands; as with the Portuguese Jogo do Pau, it doubled as a sport and as a combat system.

    However, the different techniques used for the diverse lengths of staff are very similar both throughout Asian countries, largely inspired by the Indian style, and in the majority of the Occidental countries, such as England and France. The various stick fighting styles and the combative matrix that they are part of (generally in the rural areas) each have a characteristic tone. This seems to be the result of deep cultural trends that define the degree to which agonistic aggression is related to a fundamentally ludic or "sporting" approach. The great difference between the Occidental and the Asian styles lies in the mentality with that they practice their techniques."
Jogo do PauJournal of Manly Arts

 

"Well I carry my martial cane every day on my walk. The Tai Chi implements that I prefer are wooden -- not because (they claim) Chi flows better through it, but because I like the feel and weight of it and the fact that it can go almost anywhere. Also it’s less dangerous to practice partners than edges or metal.  Not only is the weapon behavior a manifestation of the skill and coordination of muscular energy against physics, as you point out, but it does a couple of other things: it helps explore an extended range of space, and provides feedback, if you pay attention, to help correct body mechanics and refine positioning."
-  Bob Gotsch

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

 

"The major trend in thought on boxing reflected in the Epitaph [Epitaph for Wang Zhengnan (1669), composed by Huang Zongxi] is emphasis on the concept of "stillness" overcoming "movement" or the mental in relation to physical aspects of boxing. This was not necessarily a new concept. Yu Dayou advocated it in his manual on staff fighting (1565), and its basis can be traced to Sun Zi's Art of War (c. 476 B.C.).  This concept involves taking advantage of an opponent's movement and thus might be perceived as a defensive approach to countering offensive action. This more disciplined "military" approach was at variance with some of the more "individualistic" and "flowery" movements which characterized many popular styles, which were conveniently described as "Shaolin boxing" in the Epitaph."
-  Stanley Henning, Ignorance, Legend and Taijiquan

 

 

The Magical Staff:  Quotes, Legends, Lore

 

"The Chinese word gun (棍 pinyin gùn) refers to a long Chinese staff weapon. It is known as one of the four major weapons, along with the spear, saber, and the sword, called in this group "The Grandfather of all Weapons".  There are various kinds of gun and these include (from olden days): Monkey Staff (猴棍), Biangan (鞭杆), Mad Demon Staff (瘋魔棍), Tianqi Staff (天齊棍), Staff of Five Tigers and Goat Herds (五虎群羊棍), Nunchaku (二節棍), Taiji Staff of Thirteen (太極十三杆), Taiji Quarterstaff (太極大杆), Taiji Staff (太極棍), Staff of Eight Trigrams and Seven Stars (八卦七星竿), Staff of Eight Fairies (八仙棍), Flail (槤枷).  The types of gun normally used nowadays for exercises and competitions are the bailangan (白栏杆) and the nangun (南棍)."
-   Wikipedia Gun (Staff)

 

 

"Speak and you get Nanten's staff,
Do not speak and you still get Nanten's staff."
-   Zen Koan
    Take a look at the Zen painting of Nanten's staff by Nakahara Nantembo (1839-1925)
    Zen Masters would pound their ceremonial staff on the ground when making a point during a lecture or discussion.  
    For more Zen Koans using the staff as a teaching prop see below

 

 

Zen Staff by Unmon Sokudo (1690-1765)

 

 

"The literal English translation of tahn bong sul is "short staff techniques". This may seem confusing at first because we tend to associate a "staff" as something which is quite long. A more figurative interpretation of "tahn bong" would be "short stick". However, in order to maintain the integrity of the literal translation "short staff" will be used.  Tahn bong techniques can be found in martial arts styles in almost every country in the world. Throughout Asia it is often one of the training tools and/or weapons of fighting arts in many countries; Japan, Okinawa, Philippines, China, Viet Nam, Malaysia, Indonesia, Burma, Thailand, Korea, and many more.  Tahn bong sul (short stick techniques) are helpful in developing concentration and physical awareness of techniques, both in empty-hand and weapon training.  The tahn bong is versatile for quick blocks, strikes, traps, disarms, and counterattack movements. It can be easily concealed, as in being hidden in a jacket or behind ones back.  Tahn bong techniques and training methodologies have guidelines which are designed to direct the practitioner in order to help insure the applications are both practical and precise. Though specific training methodologies may vary from school to school and even from instructor to instructor, the basic theories, concepts and principles of tahn bong techniques remains constant. Once educated in these methodologies, an individual, under the guidance of a qualified instructor, is able to create an almost limitless series of techniques. How many techniques and variations to each technique is only limited by the knowledge and imagination of the individual." 
 -  Korean Tahn Bong, By Grand Master James S. Benko, Ph.D. 

 

 

"The walking-stick has features in common with several existing martial arts weapons:  The stick can be held in two hands and used like the bo or con, (quarterstaff)  to block and strike.  The techniques for jo, or short stick, are almost all suitable for the walking-stick.  The handle provides a hook which can be put to various uses, much like the hooked kama.  The handle allows use of many of the techniques developed for the tonfa, especially when the tonfa is held reversed. The walking-stick can also be held on the handle with the shaft along the fore-arm, reinforcing blocks like the tonfa.  Any techniques developed for swords, rapiers etc. also have application.  But unlike the above weapons, the walking-stick can be carried anywhere in a non-aggressive manner and is thus a suitable self-defence weapon, especially for walkers."
-   
The First Walking Stick Kata

 

 

"Remarkably most legends involving saints with a staff as their characteristic object, tell us a tale featuring a key element of human existence: water.  According to these stories the staff itself is an instrument enabling the saint to strike a wellspring.  Obviously the well itself became a site of worship and eventually even pilgrimage.  Either because it had been struck by someone who would later be a saint (the association with the holy person), or thanks to the Christianization of the sacred source or pool." 
-  Gerard J. Van Den Broek, The Return of the Cane, p. 69    [Dowsing]

 

 

"The jo can be used to strike like a sword, sweep like a naginata, thrust like a spear (yari). Its two ends can be used, unlike the single point of a sword, and its ma-ai (fighting distance) can be varied according to the hand grip you take. Because of its speed and changeable ma-ai, it is a formidable weapon."
Muso Shindo-Ryu Jodo   

 

 

"The most popular Shaolin Kung Fu 'tool' was the staff.  A long stick that had a variety of uses and purposes.  It is a multi-purpose implement that can be used for many things other than self defense. A staff is used as a walking stick, to carry loads on your back, carry and transport two water buckets, as a lever, tent pole, writing implement (in the sand) and many more. This is also the weapon that almost all Chinese martial arts consider to be "The Father of all Weapons".  It is also highly effective and recommended for all martial artists to learn.

There were of course many staff types as there are different woods, people and ways of using. But in general most staffed weapons can be but into 5 specific sizes (general lengths - all Shaolin weapon dimensions were measured in 'natural' measurements relating to the user):

Dragon Staff (app 1½ person lengths or 8 to 9 foot)
Shaolin Staff (app 1 person length or 5½ to 6½ foot[also Rat Tail Staff, very flexible, Bai La Wood])
Carry Staff (app ¾ person length)
Cudgel or Walking Stick (app half person length and very stout)
Flute, Ruler (app fore arm to fore arm and hand length)"
Chinese Weapons   

 

 

 

"The jo was also adapted by Morihei Ueshiba, the founder of aikido, to teach the principles of aikido.  His use of the weapon is called aikijo. Aikijo resembles jodo in that both involve fencing with the jo, but differs in the nature and purpose of the fencing. Jodo techniques are often faster and sharper because angular attacks and defenses are part of its combat orientation. Aikijo techniques are slower and softer because circular movements can blend [with] attacks and defenses and reduce the attitude of conflict.  Inserting and entwining techniques are not found to the same extent in aikijo as they are in jodo, nor are the numerous targets of atemi waza. Aikijo does have jo-taking and jo-keeping techniques, but these are aikido throws in which the jo is incidental to the throw rather than essential to it. Thus, while aikijo is more limited than jodo because it has fewer targets and fewer kinds of movements, it is also much broader in that its application does not depend on a four-foot staff but on the fundamental movements of aikido."
-   D. Zier and T. Lang Jo, The Japanese Short Staff, 1985.

 

 

"One of the best tools to help in crossing treacherous terrain is a staff about 4 to 6 feet long and 1 1/2 inches in diameter. Light, dry wood, such as a small jack pine cut to suitable length makes an adequate one. A staff becomes a third leg in uncertain footing and often prevents a nasty fall. With such a staff, you can poke firmly into a stream bottom and, by moving either one leg or the staff at a tirne (never both together), always have two "legs" to give you balance. You can probe for holes, big rocks, or soft spots in the bottom of muddy streams. If you are with a partner, you can hold the staff between you and support each other. In crossing the glacial creeks of the Far North, a staff of driftwood or scraggly timber found on the spot often represents the difference between crossing or staying on the same side. Such creeks, even in midsummer, have their source only a few miles away in the high glacial fields above. When you ford them in early morning, the creeks are low and clear, the flow reduced by the cold of the night. After a warm day, they are roaring, muddy demons, three times as deep, and vicious enough to roll rocks of glacial wash the size of buckets down in a seething boil that can often be heard for miles. A good rule for crossing creeks and streams is to ford them either at the slow end of a deep pool or just before a long stretch of placid water breaks into a riffle. At these two places the water will be shallower and the current slower. Usually this is the widest parts of the stream. A hiking staff is also useful in desert areas. In some desert country, like portions of Arizona, there is a saying of the oldtimers that "everything that grows either sticks or bites you." This isn't literally true, but poisonous snakes and insects, and the various forms of cacti, keep the hiker constantly on his guard. He must continuously wind in and out among the sharp-tined cacti plants, some of which would penetrate the tough hide of a horse's leg, and be on the watch for harmful reptiles. A staff is useful for breaking an occasional spine out of the way or for defending yourself against desert rattlers... ."
-   Clyde Ormond, The Complete Book of Outdoor Lore and Woodcraft, 1964

 

 

"The Aikido Jo is a straight, smooth and round stick of Japanese White-Oak, roughly 4 feet in length and ¾ to 1 inch thick. It is a very versatile weapon, able to be held and used either end, and able to strike like a sword, or strike by thrusting the tip to the target. It also has a great defensive advantage, with its long reach and repertoire of techniques that flow smoothly from one to the next, in the hands of an experienced practitioner is also a very formidable weapon. As with the bokken, jo training is a very important part of Aikido. Many of the jo movements are related to empty-hand movements, so study of one helps the other. It teaches us an extra dimension of distancing between us and the opponent, and introduces us to the use of hip movement to create smooth, easy flowing movement, an inportant ability when faced with multiple attackers.  It is not entirely certain where O-Sensei derived the Aikido stave techniques from. They are definitely different from Shindo-Muso Ryu Jo-Jutsu, a style of stave techniques designed to deal specifically with attacks by a swordsman. Many of the Jo techniques exhibit a similarity to yari (spear) and naginata (halberd), which O-Sensei is known to have studied, Hozoin Ryu Yari-Jutsu being one of them. The Kashima Shinto Ryu also teaches jo, naginata and yari techniques, it is possible that Aiki Jo is a construction of O-Sensei's based upon
these known styles."
Stick Training

 

 

"When a peasant army appeared before the Shaolin temple gate, Jin Na Luo, a monk who tended the stove, grabbed his fire stoker and laid it about him with such fearlessness and vigour that the Red Turbans scattered in utter confusion. Jin Na Luo became known as the first of the Shaolin Staff Monk.  The Gun (Staff) was the first weapon ever actually used by the martial arts practitioners of Shaolin Temple. Even today the art of handling the Gun is still the most profound and best known of any other weapon practiced at Shaolin."
-   Ancient Chinese Weaponry

 

"Jodo should be done to build one's character.  Jodo should be like a steering wheel. The road is life.  There are all kinds of ways one can go down the road.  Use Jodo to steer as straight a course as possible through life."
Sensei Shimizu Takaji

 

 

"The three ways to develop strikes are:  1. Solo striking. Just hitting "air." This is the basis for learning the movement.  2. Solo striking on a heavy bag. Raise the bag high enough so you can hit the bottom of it. If that is not possible, make a "Tire-Man" or a similar workout dummy that is substantial and will give you feedback.  3. Using a training partner with a focus mitt."
-   Don Rearic, The Beginner's Guide to the Cane

 

"Today, it is not practical to walk the streets with any of the four weapons just described [sword, saber, staff/pole, spear].  However, a cane or walking stick can easily be adapted to many of the basic techniques of the four traditional weapons to devastating effect for self-defense.  Some tai chi schools have developed walking-stick forms for this purpose.  Only a little creativity is required to make the conversion."
-   Bruce Frantzis, Tai Chi: Health for Life

 

"This Immortal was named Li Tie Guai and referred to as "Iron Cane" Li because of the iron crutch that he carried.  Li is always depicted as a beggar with a crutch.  The story is told that he had attained such a high level of magic skill that he was often called from Earth to the Celestial Heavens to perform his magic. When Li traveled to the celestial regions, he traveled only in spirit, leaving his body on Earth in the charge of one of his disciples.  On one occasion, Li was gone longer than usual and the disciple thought that Li had actually died.  So, he burned his body.  When Li returned to Earth and found that his body was gone, he looked for the body of a recently deceased individual to enter.  The only body he could find was the body of a lame beggar.  Li entered this body and thus is always depicted as a beggar with an iron crutch.  He also carries a pilgrim's gourd and he is sometimes shown standing with a deer or standing on a crab.  It was said that Li Tie Guai possessed the supreme swordsmanship but most often appeared poor, down trodden, and acted like a clown - not having a care in the world.  Lu Shui-Tian said that Li's contribution to the Eight Immortals Sword was strategy because he appeared as a clown and beggar yet possessed the highest sword skill of all of the Eight Immortals."
Pa Kua Chang 

 

"Lee Tie Guai's direction is south, and his element is fire. He’s shown as a street beggar, carrying a magic staff and an iron crutch. His staff and the gourd that he also carries are symbols of medicine, and he can create medicines due to his mastery of energy. He’s a benevolent saint, believed to help the poor and the sick. He occasionally travels to the Heavens in the form of a dragon, but also visits Earth when needed, rising a chimera."

 

Lee Tie Guai, an Eight Immortal

 

"The Master with the Iron Crutch [Li T‘ieh-kuai, Lee Tie Guai] offers a striking contrast to the other members of the group. Hideous, hairy, deformed, and scantily clad in filthy rags, he is the type of that repulsive legion haunting to the present day every city in China, and preying upon a long-suffering public, which is moved to the giving of alms not so much by pity as by feelings of horror and fear. His recognized emblem is the bottle-gourd or calabash that forms part of the equipment of every hsien; and to the gourd is generally added a more distinctive object, his crutch. A mysterious vapour—a kind of fata Morgana—floats upwards from the mouth of the gourd, and in its midst is seen the image of the sage's hun, which may appear in nondescript shape as in our woodcut, or in the guise of a miniature double of his bodily self. Sometimes the hun is replaced by a spherical object representing the "Philosopher's Stone".  In the form with which nature endowed him, the sage Li T‘ieh-kuai was a fine man of imposing presence.  While yet of tender age he heard Tao. Choosing a mountain cave for his abode, he set himself to the cultivation of mental and physical purity as taught by the Taoists. Li Lao Chün (Lao Tzŭ) and The Master Wan Ch‘iu used often to come down from heaven to visit his rocky hermitage in order to instruct him in the subject of his studies.  One day T‘ieh-kuai was going to meet Lao Chün by appointment on Hua Shan, and so he gave a pupil of his the following instructions: "My p‘o," said he, will remain here while my hun goes upon a journey. If by chance in seven days' time my hun has not returned, you may then burn the p‘o."  The pupil received an urgent message to visit his sick mother, and, impatient of delay, burnt his master's body on the sixth day. The following day in due course T‘ieh-kuai returned to find his p‘o gone, and no habitation left for his hun, till he spied lying near by the corpse of one who had died of starvation. Into it the wandering soul entered, giving it new life; and that is the reason why Li T‘ieh-kuai, instead of his original handsome appearance, has now the loathsome shape of a cripple."
-  W. Perceval Yetts, 1916, The Eight Immortals

 

 

"In most Chinese martial arts schools, the staff is called Gun, and it is usually about five to six feet long. In Taiji Quan practice, however, the staff is called Gan, and often the sound “er” is added, so that the word is pronounced “Ganer.” It may also be called Da Gan Zi, which means long staff or pole. The length of a Gan depends on the height of the practitioner, but it usually exceeds seven feet. The bottom end of the staff is bigger than the tip. The staff is made of wood called Bei La or white wax, and the complete trunk of a single tree is used to make each staff. When a white-wax tree grows to sufficient height, it is cut down and given a special treatment to increase its toughness. The wood has a naturally springy quality and a lot of tensile strength. Because of this characteristic, even a hard strike to a staff will not cause noticeable vibration in the hand of the person holding it.  When a staff is used for a long time, its color gradually changes from white to a shiny, dark brown because of the accumulation of sweat that soaks into the wood from the practitioner’s hands. This makes the staff easier to manipulate and improves its overall effectiveness.

In Taiji Quan, long staff practice is commonly called Taiji Zhan Gan or Taiji sticking staff. It can also be called Taiji Nian Gan, which means Taiji adhering staff; Taiji Zhan Nian Gan, which means Taiji sticking and adhering staff; Taiji Dui Zha Gan, which means Taiji stabbing staff; or Taiji Shisan Gan, which means Taiji thirteen-skill staff. In the term Zhan Gan, Gan means long staff and Zhan means to stick or adhere. In Taiji Zhan Gan then, the staff practice that follow Taiji Quan principles, a sticking or adhering skill is used to maintain contact between your staff and that of your partner at all times.

In olden times, all famous masters intently practiced Zhan Gan daily and achieved a high level of mastery in sticking staff. The basic principles of Zhan Gan are exactly the same as those of Taiji push hands. One can think of the long staff as simply making one’s arms longer. Although all push hands principles and skills apply to staff training, the latter is more difficult than the former. Traditionally, people started to practice sticking staff only after they were adept at Taiji form and push hands training. Sticking staff training not only increases one’s ability to use different kinds of internal force, but also is beneficial for footwork skills and body movements, especially for learning to move the waist. Sticking staff training is the best way to understand high-level Taiji Quan skills.

The long staff is a special weapon, and it has unique features. By tradition, thirteen key words are used to express its primary functions. They are: Kai or open; He, close; Fa, launch; Beng, explode; Pi, chop; Dian, point; Zha, stab; Bo, move; Liao, raise; Chan, wind up; Dai, lead; Hua, slide; and Jie, interrupt. The difference between Taiji staff skills and the staff skills of other styles is that all Taiji staff skills are based on Taiji Quan principles. So all Taiji sticking staff techniques exemplify Taiji Quan concepts and derive from Taiji Quan principles. To master staff skills, you must understand the differentiation and balancing of Yin and Yang. You must also understand the meanings of: Zhan, which is to stick upward; Nian, which is to adhere to; Lian, which is to link; Sui, which is to follow; Ting, which is to listen; Yin, which is to lure; Hua, which is to dissolve; Na, which is to control; and Fa, which is to launch. The meaning of traditional Taiji Quan injunctions, such as: “to know yourself and your opponent"; “to lure in and fall into emptiness”; "to borrow force from your opponent and use his force to beat him back"; “to use mind rather than strength”; “to use softness to defend against hardness”; "to use stillness to control motion"; “to yield yourself and follow your opponent”; "to launch later but reach first"; and “to use four ounces to defend against a thousand pounds”, should be applied in all sticking staff applications."
Zhang Yun and Peter Kindfeld, Taiji Sticking Staff

 

 

"Aiiki-jo teaches principles and concepts of aikido via the staff, i.e. extension and showing quite graphically the movement of circles and spirals in technique. (Jo-dori vs. Tai-jutsu) like Shiho-nage, kote gaeshi, irimi-nage, can all be expressed through Jo-nage/dori, one of the best I have seen show this relationship is Andy Sato head of Aikido World Alliance.  If you ever get the chance to train with him do so.  Secondly the 31 count kata which spawned the Kumi jo was Saito's
attempt to simplify and standardize movements, using sweeps, strikes and tsuki's that are both similar to empty hand, and Ken, the so call Riai of aikido. These Katas that now are used teach the aforementioned Maai, timing, footwork, and bear little resemblance to actual empty hand technique, but do teach us movement principles that are fundamentally the same. Now contrast that with SMR, which has a totally different organization to its kata and uses the Jo completly different.
For example, the thrusts done in SMR very different than in Aiki-jo, as well, most katas, are Ken vs. Jo, secondly the rhythm of practice is different too. Just like the rhytmn of daito-ryu is very different than the rhytmn of Aikido practice.  Secondly the stance is different too. SMR is there to teach you combative principles that in theory are there to provide you with the tools to be successful in a combative situation, albeit, rare that I will be attacked by a katana wielding person when coincidentally I have a Jo. Whereas Aiki-jo is used as a supplement to my empty handed Aikido. If I had my choice, I would put more principles of SMR in Aiki-jo than the other way around."
-   Dan Hoover, AikiWeb Forum

 

 

"Shintō Musō-ryū, or Shindō Musō-ryū,(神道夢想流) most commonly known as Jodo (杖道), is a koryu (old school) of jojutsu, teaching the art of handling the Japanese quarterstaff jo. The purpose of the art on a purely technical level is to teach how to defeat a swordsman in combat using the jo and a vareity of weapons with emphasize on the proper distance, timing and concentration.  The art was founded by samurai Musō Gonnosuke Katsuyoshi (夢想權之助勝吉) in the early 1600s and, according to legend, first put to use in a duel with Miyamoto Musashi. The original art created by Muso Gonnosuke has evolved and been added upon ever since its inception and up to modern times. The art was successfully brought outside of its original domain in Fukuoka and outside of Japan itself in the 19th and 20th century. The spreading of Shinto Muso-ryu beyond Japan was largely the effort of Shimizu Takaji, considered the 25th Shihanke, and with the assistance of his own students who helped spread the art further in the world partially through the cooperation with the Kendo community first initiated by Shimizu Takaji.  The Kihon no Uchi Tsuki Waza, or basic techniques, are a system of twelve techniques drawn from the existing jo kata (with minor modifications from the original kata) and used as a way to better introduce a new student to jodo. The kihon were systemized mainly by Shimizu Takaji at his Tokyo dojo in his effort to make jodo more appealing to new students and easing their introduction to kata training. Shimizu's peer Takayama Kiroku would bring the kihon techniques back to Fukuoka where they were formally adopted into Shinto Muso-ryu.  Shimizu Takaji also removed and/or modified some of the more dangerous techniques and early kata so as not to cause injuries to newer students.  Kihon are trained both individually tandoku dosa and in pairs sotai dosa, with the shidachi using the fo and the uchidachi using the sword."
Shinto Muso-Ryu - Wikipedia

 

 

Disclaimer

Warning:  Practicing with Staff Weapons Can Be a Dangerous Activity for Adults

 

 

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Purchasing a Short Staff (Jo, Cane, Walking Stick)

 

Sizing and Selecting a Short Staff (Jo, Cane, Walking Stick)

 

Retailers and Vendors for Canes, Walking Sticks, and Short Staffs

How to Choose the Size of Your Cane?   Suggestions from Fashionable Canes.

How to Size your Cane for a Correct Fit.  Suggestions from Cane Masters. 

Sizing Your Cane or "Wait Don't Cut Off Too Much."

Cane Sizing Techniques

Comments:

Since I am 6' 6" tall, I prefer a cane, for active walking, that is 3" to 4" longer than determined by the first three procedures listed above.  When I reach out with the cane and touch the ground, in front of my foot, I like my elbow to be bent about 15° to 25° up from the extended/straightened position.  If the cane is too short, for me, I have to straighten the arm too much, and the end of the cane may not touch the ground where I want it.   Again, I use a pure hickory heartwood cane, Instructor's Walking Cane, 40" (103 cm) long and 1" (2.54 cm) in diameter, from Cane Masters.  Others prefer a cane placed closer to the hip and leg so as to mostly be able to push directly down to lift the torso up, or mostly to support an unbalanced body.  I prefer a curved crook neck wood cane to function more effectively and primarily as a walking stick for stability on uneven terrain, fitness exercises, and self-defense.  Experiment yourself to find the best cane "fit" for your needs! 

Since you can simply cut any solid wooden short staff down to the length you prefer, purchasing a Jo/Cane that is too long is not a problem without an immediate solution.   

Sensei Fuchs told me that the length of the jo used in Aikido should actually be determined by the distance from the floor to under your armpit when standing up straight (for me this is a 13 Hands Staff).  Another source said it should be equal to the distance of your arms fully extended to the side, and the distance from left finger tip to right finger tip.   

Short staff also named as Biān Gān 杆 (whip staff) has a length of 13 times the width of practitioner's hand.  Shifu Jiang says that the Wu Dang short whip staff  is 13 hands long, and the stafff for use in the Chen Shen-Pu Short Staff form is 13 hands long.  For me, relative to the size of my hands and height (6'6"=198cm), my "13 Hands Staff" is 54" long (137.2cm).  

The "Eye Brow Staff" is a staff about the length from the ground to your eyebrow when you are standing up straight. 

The Correct Length for a Jo Stave.  Mokuren Dojo Blog.  "The story goes that Muso Gonnosuke, founder of jojutsu, received a vision from god during a prolonged fast at a temple.  God apparently told Muso that he would be able to beat Musashi if he would use a stick of certain dimensions.  The magical dimensions translate into metric as about 128cm long or into English as about 51 inches long.  Serious, fanatical jojutsu guys are typically sticklers for this 128cm standard.  There is no flexibility in the standard for smaller or larger participants. I am not a koryu snob.  I am more of the ideal of making jodo my own thing - taking ownership of the art - and I say that the standard is not magic.  It seems to me that you need a jo to be short enough that you can palm both ends and move your shoulders through a wide range, and 6-8 inches longer than a normal 40-42 inch bokken. That seems to put the natural length of the jo between about 46" and 52".

"Our select ash is lighter in weight than the hickory.  But the ash is not as strong as the hickory.  Choose the ash if you are using the staff as a primarily thrusting weapon.  Fewer strikes.  While the hickory is heavier, it is also more resistant to impact damage.  Pick the hickory if you plan on striking with the staff in your training."
-   Purpleheart Armories Company FAQ

Anyone out there know of a company making a replica of the staff of the Monkey King used in the film Forbidden Kingdom??  Email me! 

 

Mike Garofalo's short staff weapons; his favorites:

I am 6'6" (198 cm) tall, and have practiced with a variety of short staff weapons over the years.  Currently, I practice daily only with a cane.

I use an Instructor's Walking Cane, 40" (103 cm) long and 1" (2.54 cm) in diameter, from Cane Masters.  This cane weights 1lb, 2 oz (510 gm).  This beautiful martial arts combat cane is made of pure hickory heartwood, has multiple notches at three key gripping points, has a rounded hooked horn, and has a rubber covered tip.  I also own the same Instructor's Walking Cane made of oak - a gift from my children.   
   
    This cane has a rounded tip to the crook.  The curved crook end is just a little wider and larger than with other canes.  The cane is thoroughly sanded, and very smooth to the touch.  It does not attract any undue attention as a weapon, and appears to be a ordinary, sturdy, and practical walking cane suitable for a big fellow like me.  Make no mistake, however, the Instructor's Walking Cane is a true combat weapon, as well as a practical walking stick.  Make sure it has enough length for your walking stride.  Most canes I see people use are a bit too short for a good walking stick. 

    I use this 40" pure hickory heartwood combat cane for all my weapons practice; and, adapt other short staff, sword, and broadsword routines and techniques for practice and performances with my hooked wooden cane.  The only weapon I practice with on a daily basis is a wooden cane; and the only weapon I teach now in my Taijiquan classes is the cane.  Also, whenever I take a long walk, anywhere, I bring my cane along.  I gave away all my swords, sabers, and longer staff weapons to my son.    

    My older students like the cane because it is very inexpensive, unobtrusive, ordinary, easy to carry, practical, effective as a weapon, and appropriate for older persons.  Many people practice with a straight wooden stick, 34"-41" long, 3/4"-1" in diameter.  There is no curved crook end to their wooden stick. 

Many short staff forms work better with a 46" to 52" straight wooden staff (Jo, Guai Gun, 13 Hands Staff).  I have used a number of staff weapons of this size:  

2) Jatoba Brazilian Cherry Jo Staff, 48" (122 cm) long x 1 1/8" (2.85 cm) in diameter, Weight: 1 pound, 7 ounces.  The Sakura Ultima Brand Extreme Hardwood Hanbo, Aikido Jo. 
3) Red Oak Jo Staff, 50" (127 cm) long x 1" (2.54 cm) in diameter from Martial Arts Mart.
4) Finished Rattan Jo Staff, 49" long x 1" diameter,  from WLE.
5)  White Oak Jo Staff, 50" long and 1 1/4" diameter, from WLE

 

    Mike Garofalo with Cane        Mike Garofalo with Staff    
    (1)                                   (5)

 

 

Retailers and Manufacturers of Short Staff Products
Walking Staff, Jo, Bo, Cane, Walking Stick, Shepard's Staff, Hiking Staff/Stick


All Combat Martial Arts Supplies: Staff and Bo Weapons 

Antique Cane Auction at Kimball Sterling

Baby Boomer Walking Canes

Brazos Walking Sticks  Walking sticks, staffs and canes. 

Caneman 2

Cane Masters.  Quality canes and customization options.  Excellent choice for purchasing combat canes designed for martial artists. 

Canes and Walking Sticks: A Stroll Through Time and Place.  By Jeffrey Snyder.  2004, 288 pages. 

Canes Galore 

Cold Steel Stick Portal

Custom Jo Staffs by Mark Taylor  

Diamond Willow Walking Sticks 

Dragon Walking Stick Cane (high grade of high impact Polypropylene, 39.5 inches) from Cold Steel

Dragon Walking Canes 

Dragon Walking Cane

Fashionable Canes and Walking Sticks  A wide selection of canes for sale online, and useful information. 

Custom Bo Staffs.  Created by Mark S. Taylor, Woodtrades.

Hickory Jo Manufacturer 

How to Walk Safely with a Cane.  By Sifu John Chow. 

House of Canes

Google: Canes and Walking Stick Stores,

Karate Depot Martial Arts Equipment: Bo and Jo 

Kentucky Walking Sticks

Make Your Own Walking Sticks: How to Craft Canes and Staffs from Rustic to Fancy.  By Charles Self.  2007, 128 pages. 

Making Walking Sticks for a Hobby.  By David Dawson.  2000, 56 pages. 

Martial Arts Mart

Martial Arts Supplies 

Phoenix Walking Stick Company  

Pikes, Pole-Axes, and Staff Weapons.   From Armouronline.  

Purple Heart Wooden Swords and Staff 

Sakura Martial Arts 

Stickmaking: A Complete Course.  By Andrew Jones and Clive George.  2008, 176 pages. 

Superior Martial Arts 

Traditional Filipino Weapons

The Walking Cane Store 

Walking Cane World 

Walking Sticks and Canes Books

Walking Stick Shop

Walking Sticks: Catalog and Links    The Sei Do Kai Catalog.  

Walking Stick Manufacturing.  UTube Video, 8:45 min. 

Wampanoag Carved Walking Sticks    

Weighted Bars: Hampton Gel Grip and CAP Difinity Toning Bars, 50" long (5, 8, 10, 12, 15 and 20lb bars)

Weighted Bars: Versa Bar: Weighted Bars, 4' long (12, 18, and 24lb bars) 

Wing Lam Enterprises - Bo and Staff Weapons 

Workshops, Seminars, Lectures, Demonstrations on the Cane, Walking Stick, Jo, Short Staff

Zengu Wholesale Martial Arts Supply

 

 

 


             A cane collector

 

Return to the Index at the Top of This Webpage

 

 

 

 

  
  

 

 

Mystical and Magickal Uses of the Staff
Short Staff, Cane, Stick, Wand

 

 

 

 

The Caduceus vs the Staff of Asclepius (Asklepian)


Cloud Hands Blog


Definitions:  Shujo or Shakujo: A Buddhist priest's staff made from wood and metal.


Green Way Blog


Eight of Wands and Chaos Magic


The Green Wizard's Reading List 


Magical Staffs in Taoist Rituals.  By Chen Yaoting. 


Magickal Staves 


One Druid's Journey 


 Rod of Aaron, Staff of Moses


The Staff: Bibliography, Links, Quotes, Notes, Lessons


The Spirit of Gardening


Staffs and Wands - Handcrafted: Sticks, Stones and Beyond 


Wikipedia - Staff (Stick) 

 

 

"The title of Monkey Pole, or Monkey King Staff, is a curious reference to the legendary Monkey King character from Chinese mythology. The Monkey King is a mythical figure whose exploits are described in the 400-year-old Chinese classic Journey to the West.  The Money King was an immortal, a god-like creature who was characterized by mischievous acts and defiance of the ruler of Heaven. His weapon of choice was a great rod of iron that he had stolen from the Dragon King of the Eastern Sea. He bound the ends of his staff with gold and engraved it with the words "Gold-bound Wand of my Desires."  Imbued in the staff itself were magic powers that allowed it to change size from the finest of needles to a length that could span the distance between Heaven and Earth.  The mercurial nature of the Monkey King's staff is said to represent the flexible nature of the Buddhist doctrine and its ability to be applied to all situations great and small."
-   Hung Chur Kwun - The Hung Gar Monkey Pole Set   Refer also to the major 2008 film: The Forbidden Kingdom

 

 

                   
                                                                                           Jet Li as the Monkey King

 

 

"Monkey King", or known to the Chinese as "Journey to West", written by Wu Ch'eng-en(1500?-1582), a scholar-official, is one of the renowned classical Chinese novels about an allegorical rendition of the journey, mingled with Chinese fables, fairy tables, legends, superstitions, popular beliefs, monster stories as well as whatever the author could find in the Taoist and Buddhist religions. It was based on a true story of a famous Chinese monk, Xuan Zang (602-664). After years of trials and tribulations, he traveled on foot to what is today India, the birthplace of Buddhism, to seek for the Sutra, the Buddhist holy book. When he returned to China, or the Great Tang as was called that time, he started to translate the sutras into Chinese, thus making a great contribution to the development of Buddhism in China.
The Monkey King is an indeed rebellious extraordinary being, born out of a rock, fertilized by the grace of Heaven.  Being extremely smart and capable, he learned all the magic tricks and gongfu from a master Taoist, being able to transform a single hair from his head into seventy-two different images such as a tree, a bird, a beast of prey or a bug as small as a mosquito.  Using clouds as a vehicle he can travel 180,000 miles in a single somersault and wields a huge iron bar that supposedly serves as ballast of the seas and can expand or shrink at its owner's command - his favorite weapon in his later feats. He claims to be the King in defiance of the only authority over heaven, the seas, the earth and the subterranean world -- Yu Huang Da Di, or the "Great Emperor of Jade" in Chinese."
Adapted from HaiWang Yuan, Western Kentucky University   Refer also to the major 2008 film: The Forbidden Kingdom

 

 

Master Tung Kwo asked Chuang Tzu:
"Show me where the Tao is to be found."
Chuang Tzu replied;
"There is nowhere it is not to be found."

 

 

"By tradition the [Dragon Gate Quanzhen Daoist] priests possess seven sacred objects: “The first object is the meditation cushion which tames the monsters of the mind. The second is the robe which subdues the mischievous mind. The third is the bowl which holds only purified (meatless) food. The fourth is a straw hat for protection against wind, rain, frost, and snow. The fifth is a horse-hair whisk or fan for sweeping away the dust of the mundane world. The sixth is a bag for carrying the sacred scriptures. The seventh is a staff for clearing the obstacles that block the clear wind and bright moon of the Tao."  The priests will also apply the following cultivations in their daily life: “When walking, the gait should be like that of a crane and the body should move like an immortal floating with the winds. When sitting, the body should be still as a rock. When sleeping, it should be curved like a bow. When standing, it should be like a tall pine. Your body should be as flexible as a willow in the wind and as relaxed as the petals of a lotus.”
-   Shi Jing and Shi Dao, Introduction to Quanzhen Daoism and the Dragon Gate Tradition

 

 

The Magic Circle
By
John William Waterhouse

 

 

"Devi prachanda dora danda daitya
darpa winashine
Roopam dehi jayam dehi
Yasho dehi dwisho jahi.

"Oh Goddess, with your great staff you have
destroyed the demons of egoism and thought.
Grant me freedom, victory, fame and destroy all hostility."
-  Devi Puja (Worship of the Goddess)
   Krishna Das, Pilgrim Heart  

 

 

"Staves are a traditional prop for the elderly and infirm, and this has led to their association with wisdom.  The ability of a staff to perform wonders is also featured prominently in the scriptures of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Moses and Aaron, in their task to liberate the Hebrews from Egypt and deliver them to the Promised Land, employ staves. The staves are capable of performing miraculous feats to demonstrate the power and authority of God.  Staves are also associated with wizards and other users of magic and sorcery. Haraibou (literal translation meaning 'purification stick') were staves that were used by the miko (Japanese female exorcists) to fight demons in Japanese lore."
Wikipedia - Staff (Stick) 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

 

"In Egyptian hieroglyphics, the king was recognized by the staff he carried. When Howard Carter in 1923 opened the tomb of young King Tutankhamen, the archeologist discovered over 130 walking sticks, many beautiful, some made of gold, and some elaborately carved—dating back to the year 1,358 B.C., more than 3,300 years ago."
Cane Quest

 

 

                 
Display of Canes from King Tutankhamen's Tomb

 

 

"And the Lord spake unto Moses, saying, "Speak unto the children of Israel, and take of every one of them a rod according to the house of their fathers, of all their princes according to the house of their fathers twelve rods: write thou every man's name upon his rod. And thou shalt write Aaron's name upon the rod of Levi: for one rod shall be for the head of the house of their fathers.  And thou shalt lay them up in the tabernacle of the congregation before the testimony, where I will meet with you.  And it shall come to pass, that the man's rod, whom I shall choose, shall blossom: and I will make to cease from me the murmurings of the children of Israel, whereby they murmur against you. And Moses spake unto the children of Israel, and every one of their princes gave him a rod apiece, for each prince one, according to their fathers' houses, even twelve rods: and the rod of Aaron was among their rods. And Moses laid up the rods before the Lord in the tabernacle of witness. And it came to pass, that on the morrow Moses went into the tabernacle of witness; and, behold, the rod of Aaron for the house of Levi was budded, and brought forth buds, and bloomed blossoms, and yielded almonds. And Moses brought out all the rods from before the Lord unto all the children of Israel: and they looked, and took every man his rod."
-  Book of Numbers, 17: 1-9

 

 

”Then the Lord said to Moses, “Say to Aaron, ‘Take your staff and stretch out your hand over the waters of Egypt, over their rivers, over their streams, and over their pools, and over all their reservoirs of water, that they may become blood and there will be blood throughout all the land of Egypt, both in vessels of wood and in vessels of stone.” So Moses and Aaron did even as the Lord had commanded. And he lifted up the staff and struck the water that was in the Nile, in the sight of Pharaoh and in the sight of his servants, and all the water that was in the Nile was turned to blood. The fish that were in the Nile died, and the Nile became foul, so that the Egyptians could not drink water from the Nile. And the blood was through all the land of Egypt."
 - Exodus 7: 15-22.  Rod of Aaron, Staff of Moses

 

"He guides me in paths of righteousness for his name's sake.  Even though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil, for you are with me;
your rod and your staff, they comfort me. "
-  Psalms, 23:3-4

 

 

“When Pharaoh speaks to you, saying, ‘Work a miracle,’ then you shall say to Aaron, ‘Take your staff and throw it down before Pharaoh, that it may become a serpent.’ So Moses and Aaron came to Pharaoh, and thus they did just as the Lord had commanded and Aaron threw his staff down before Pharaoh and his servants, and it became a serpent. Then Pharaoh also called for the wise men and the sorcerers, and they also, the magicians of Egypt, did the same with their secret arts. For each one threw down his staff and they turned into serpents. But Aaron’s staff swallowed up their staffs.’
- Exodus 7: 9-12

 

 

"There are historical associations connected with it which give the staff a sentimental value if we look back to the first British Boy Scouts of a Culhulain armed with staffs, the pilgrims or "good turn trampers," with their cockleshells and staffs, the 'prentice bands of London with their cloth yards and their staffs, the merry men of Robin Hood with bows and quarter staffs, down to the present-day mountaineers, war-scouts, and explorers; these all afford a precedent which should have its romance and meaning to the boy if properly applied.  The ceremony of enrolment of the Scout can and should be made a moment of impressive feeling for the boy when he is invested with the hat and staff that mark the Scout, and which equip him for his pilgrimage on that path where he "turns up right and keeps straight on." The officer who fails to use such opportunity is missing one of the most important chances in the Scout life of his boy. He should expect of the boy a reverence and affection for his staff---such as the swordsman has for his sword, or the hunter for his rifle. Let the Scout individualize his own staff, even to decorate it in his own way if he likes, but let him keep to his staff. To jumble all staffs into a bundle and put them away in a corner after parade, or, worse, to let them get lost and thus excuse their appearance on parade, is to neglect a valuable help to the moral training of the lad."
-   Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden-Powell, The Scout's Staff

 

 

"Professional and patient centered organizations (in fact most medical associations around the world including the World Health Organization) use the "correct" and traditional symbol of medicine, the staff of Asclepius with a single serpent encircling a staff, classically a rough-hewn knotty tree limb. Asclepius (an ancient Greek physician deified as the God of Medicine) is traditionally depicted as a bearded man wearing a robe that leaves his chest uncovered and holding a staff with his sacred single serpent coiled around it, symbolizing renewal of youth as the serpent casts off its skin. The single serpent staff also appears on a Sumerian vase (circa 2000 BCE) representing the Healing God Ningishita, a prototype of the Greek Asklepios."
-   The Caduceus vs the Staff of Asclepius (Asklepian)

 

 

 

 

"Basho said to his disciple: "When you have a staff, I will give it to you. If you have no staff, I will take it away from you." 
Mumon's comment:
When there is no bridge over the creek the staff will help me. When I return home on a moonless night the staff will accompany me. But if you call this a staff, you will enter hell like an arrow.

With this staff in my hand
I can measure the depths and shallows of the world.
The staff supports the heavens and makes firm the earth.
Everywhere it goes the true teaching will be spread."
Basho's Staff, The Gateless Gate #44   

 

 

The Song of the Staff
By Milarepa

"Listen, my dear, inquisitive patron!
Do you know who I am?
I am the Yogi, Milarepa,
Who follows the ascetic way;
I am a yogi, great in strength and perseverance,
Who has no limitation.

The staff in my hand
Grew on a huge rock.
It was cut by a sickle and became
A companion of wild stags.

It came from Nepal, in the South;
From it I hung the Mahayana Sutras;
I take it with me to the marketplace;
It was offered to me by a faithful follower.
This is the story of my walking staff.
If you do not understand my meaning,
Listen then with great care:

The stout end, cut from near the root,
Symbolizes being "cut off" from Samsara.
The thin end, cut from near the top,
Symbolizes the "cutting off of all doubts and confusions.
It is two cubits long and represents
The twin qualities of a Buddhist.  

Of good quality and pliant, it is like
The original Mind-Essence - good and sound.
The varnish, of a pleasant brown, is like
The great harmony of the "Original Mind Nature."

Straight and supple, it symbolizes
Unmistaken practice and devotion.

The tiny grooves you see, represent
the Perfection of the Bodhi-Path,
The four joints in the cane
Are the For Infinite Wishes,
The three knots symbolize
the Three Bodies of the Buddha.

It never changes color.  This represents
The immutable reality of the Root Principle.
Its head, curved and covered, displays
The "beyond-playwords" nature of reality'
Its white glittering appearance shows
The Dharmakaya - immaculate and pure.

The hollows symbolize the void nature of all beings,
The spots are a symbol of the sole Tig Le.
The scattered black marks indicate
that Tibetan yogis and Repas
Have few disturbing thoughts.  

This cane most excellent represents
My devotion and practice in compliance with the Dharma.
Its elegance and loveliness displays
My disciples' sincerity and faith.

The iron ferrrule on the tip conveys
The perseverance of yogis in the hermitage.
The handle, wrapped with copper, represents
the mastery and attraction of Dakinis.  

The nail attached to the tip displays
The bravery and diligence of yogis;
The hanging brass ring represents
The increase of inner merits.

The ornament of Sha Bran hanging down
Is the flexible understanding of the yogi.
The thong of two twisted ropes represents
The entering of the Two-in-One Path;
The Mother-and-Son thongs intermingling,
The meeting with the Mother of the Three Bodies.

The bone-ornaments hanging on the staff
Mean many travels for the yogi.
The flint and bellow signify
That all he sees and meets
Are the yogi's friends.

The white shell hanging on the staff
Means that I shall turn the Wheel of Dharma.
The rag of leather symbolizes
The yogi's attitude, without fear or shame.

The mirror hanging on the staff
Is the Enlightenment that shines within.
The sharp knife indicates
That the pain of passions will be cut.
The stone-crystal symbolizes
The purifying of defiled habitual thoughts.

The ivory chain hanging on the staff
Is the Chain-of-Regard between Guru and disciple.
The set of bells symbolizes
My widespread reputation;
The woolen cords of read and white,
That my disciples will be numerous.  

The handsome staff that now I hold
Is the means and symbol of the conquest over evil beings.

Patron, you ask me for the meaning of this staff;
This proves you have sincerity and faith.
This present meeting witnesses
Our pure wishes in a former life.

For mankind and Devas, conceivers of all symbols,
I have sung this "Song of the White Staff."
Revere then and appreciate its Dharma teaching.
Dear patron, I hope your practice Dharma 
And win happiness supreme."

-   Milarepa, "The Song of the Staff" from
    "The Hundred Thousand Songs of Milarepa."
    Translated by C. C. Chang, 1962, 1989, Volume One, p. 190-199 

 

 

 

                    Vajrayogini
 

 

"Vajrayogini/Vajravarahi ranks first and most important among the dakinis. She is the "Sarva-buddha-dakini" the Dakini Who is the Essence of all Buddhas. Although there are a number of visual representations of Vajrayogini, certain attributes are common to all: She is mostly shown as young, naked, and standing in a desirous or dancing posture. She holds a blood-filled skull cup in one hand and a curved knife (kartr or dri-gug) in the other. Often she wears a garland of human skulls or severed heads; has a khatvanga staff leaning against her shoulder; her usually wild hair flowing down her neck and back; her face in a semi-wrathful expression. Her radiant red body is ablaze with the heat of yogic fire and surrounded by the flames of wisdom."
Vahrayogini

 

 

"The word danda, besides signifying staff, club, stick, rod, has also the meaning of corporeal punishment, chastisement, subjection, control, restrain. Self-control is exercised by the danduas (devotees) not only by the way of fasting for a number of days which varies between 18 and 21 (starting from the full moon of the month of Chaitra up to the beginning of the solar month of Baisakh), but also by performing physical exertions of different kind.  Although all sections of population can take part in the rituals, we find that in most villages where danda is performed, the majority of the danduas are from the paik or martial communities2 and the pata dandua himself is the leader of the paik akhada of the same village.  It is certainly difficult to trace the historical reasons for this connection, but elements of self-discipline, physical fitness and vigorous dance involved in the performance of danda together with the fact that both forms of physical expressions placed in the background of the Shiva-Shakti cult can be brought to explain at least in part the cultural link."
Danda Ritual Five Elements

 

 

"Viparita Danda: Viparita: “inverted,” danda: literally “staff” or “stick.” A staff given during investiture of the sacred thread. A staff or sceptre as a symbol of power and sovereignty.  In the Devanagari script, the danda is a punctuation character. The glyph consists of a single vertical stroke. In Hindi, the danda marks the end of a sentence, a function which it shares with the full stop (period) in many written languages based on the Latin, Cyrillic, or Greek alphabets.  Because of the shape of the danda glyph, the word danda is also a slang term for penis."
-   Leaping Lanka

 

 

 

 

"Staff, Scepter.  Sanskrit: Danda.  Tibetan: Berk-Ka, dByug-pa, hprul-gyis.  Many of the various staffs, sticks, and scepters occurring in depictions of Indo-Tibetan deities are often simply named danda, a term that is rather ambivalent; i.e. not discriminating between the specific forms, shapes and symbolism associated with this attribute. Although usually made from wood, a danda is sometimes made from human bone. Sometimes, it is topped by a human skull, at other times by a vajra; in some cases by both. Gada: Club."
-   Danda 

 

 

"In Chinese shamanism, a staff represents the power of the universe.  With a staff, a shaman had the power to pass on the universal knowledge to others.  Later, when teachers took over part of the shaman's job, they always taught with a small staff in their hands like a shaman."
-   Master Zhongxian Wu, Vital Breath of the Dao, p. 106  

 

 

" Li Tie Guai, is one of the Taoist Eight Immortals. 'Tie guai" means "iron walking cane." Legend says his real name was Li Xuan. There are many stories about him. Originally he was a handsome, strong, tall man. One day he told his disciple that he was going to meet Lao zi and would be gone for seven days. If his shen spirit did not return to his body form on the seventh day, his disciple should burn the body. So he sat in deep meditation and his soul went to the meeting. Unfortunately on the sixth day the disciple's mother was in critical condition and he had to leave the temple to take care of her. The disciple had no other choice but to burn his teacher's body. Soon Li's soul came back but could not find his body. In the forest he found a man who had just died of hunger, so he went inside. He discovered the body had only one leg. Just when he was going to get out of that body he heard someone laughing and clapping hands. It was Lao zi, who stopped him from jumping out of the body. "Tao does not care about the appearance," he said. "This look of yours is fine. As long as your hair is plenty, you are still a real celestial." Lao zi gave him a gold band to hold the messy hair and an iron walking cane. Li Tie guai often carries a bottle gourd on his back when he comes to visit our world. The bottle gourd contains herbal remedies that have magic powers and he uses them to cure people and save their lives."
Taoist Eight Immortals, Eight Immortals

 

 

"The Daoist Rituals of the Pervasive Mystery and Numinous Treasure states: "all those who learn Daoism should master the Nine-Segment Staff. It assists old people and saves people in emergencies, and has different names. It is necessary to know it."  The nine segments of the staff are named after the constellations, namely the Taihuang Constellation, the Yinghuo Constellation, the Jiao Constellation, the Heng Constellation, the Zhang Constellation, the Yingshi Constellation, the Zhen Constellation, the Dongjing Constellation and the Ju Constellation. When Daoist priests make Magical Staffs, "they must select famous mountains and Blissful Realms, clean the region and any ruins, take clean bamboo facing south on an auspicious day, measuring five chi and five fen long and containing nine segments, and put it in a quiet and clean place. On the days of Jiawu, Bingwu and Dingmao, or the third day of the third lunar month, the fifth day of the fifth month, the seventh day of of the seventh month, and the ninth day of the ninth month, the priests slightly bend the first segment of bamboo to the left and to the right slightly. Then they open four holes below the the first segment to insert the secret names of the Four Sacred Mountains, and open one hole in the center at the top of the bamboo to insert the secret name of the Sacred Mountain of the Centre. Later, they fill the middle part of the bamboo with Numinous Scriptures and seal the whole with wax. Those who specially take the staff with them for cultivation fill it with the Talisman of the Five Emperors.  Silk fabrics with yellow figures are used as pouches that are just large enough to hold a staff". In the rituals of Fasts and Offerings, Daoist priests can summon spirits or heavenly generals and destroy hells according to rules with Magical Staffs made in this way. "Point to Heaven with the staff and the heavenly spirits will pay homage; point to Earth with the staff and the Earth Spirits will welcome the Daoist; point to the northeast with the staff and the bodies of all the ghosts will be controlled". When the Ritual Master performs rituals, he often hangs a small yellow seven-cun long streamer under the second segment of the staff, on which are written the title of the Heavenly Lord of Salvation from Misery in the Ten Directions15 and the Talisman of Mysterious Transformations of the Ten Directions. The Great Law of the Numinous Treasure of the Highest Clarity by Wang Qizhen says that when the ritual master destroys hells, he gazes at the staff and "transforms it into a pillar in the form of the dragon's head and the tiger's tail. The dragon is brilliant and holds a splendid streamer in its mouth. Numinous wind and auspicious clouds coil around the dragon, shining limitlessly".
-  Chen Yaoting.  Magical Staffs in Taoist Rituals 

 

 

 

 

Chinese Chan Buddhist Master Baqiao said to a group, "If you have a staff, I will give you a staff; if you have no staff, I will take your staff away."
Wumen added, "It helps you across a river where bridges are out, and gets you back to the village when there is no moon.  If your call it a staff, you go to hell
fast as an arrow."  Zen Master Wuzhou added, "Baqiao raised his staff, startling all creation: shrimp may fly past the heavens, but eyebrows are still above eyes."

"With this staff in my hand
I can measure the depths and shallows of the world.
The staff supports the heavens and makes firm the earth.
Everywhere it goes the true teaching will be spread." 

-  "Unlocking the Zen Koan: A New Translation of the Zen Classic
   Wumenguan."  Translated by Thomas Cleary, 1993, 1997, p. 195.  

 

 

"The peerless master moves with his group from place to place in the mountains.  His small band contains two highly advanced American disciples.  After Babaji has been in one locality for some time he says, 'Dera danda uthao,' 'Let us lift our camp and staff.'  He carries a symbolic danda (bamboo staff).  His words
are the signal for moving with his group instantaneously to another place.  He does not always employ this method of astral travel; sometimes he goes on foot from peak to peak."
-  Told by Swami Kebalananda to Paramhansa Yogananda in 1920, Autobiography of a Yogi, p. 294.

 

 

"A monk asked, "What's the essential meaning of Zen?"
Xita replied, "You don't have Buddha nature."
The monk said, "What is sudden enlightenment?"
Xita drew a circle in the ground with his staff.
The monk asked, "What is gradual enlightenment?"
Xit poked the middle of the empty space three times with his staff."
Zen's Chinese Masters, 2000, p. 208
   Translated by Andy Ferguson

 

 

Deshan said to the monks, "If you speak you get thirty blows.  If you don't speak, you get thirty blows."
Yantou later said, "Old Deshan usually just relied on a white staff.  If the Buddha came he hit him. 
If an ancestor came he hit him.  Why does he have so many students."
Zen's Chinese Masters, 2000, p. 199

 

 

"The morality-jewel inherent in the Buddha-nature stamps itself on the mind-ground of the enlightened one;
Whose robe is cut out of mists, clouds, and dews,
Whose bowl anciently pacified the fiery dragons,
And whose staff once separated the fighting tigers;
Listen now to the golden rings of his staff giving out mellifluous tunes.
These are not, however, mere symbolic expressions, devoid of historical contents;
Wherever the holy staff of Tathagatahood moves, the traces are distinctly marked."
Sacred Buddhist Scriptures 

 

 

"Unmon showed his staff to the assembly and said, "This staff has changed into a dragon and has swallowed up the heaven and the earth.  Where do mountains, rivers and the great earth come from?"
Hekiganroku, Case 60, Unmon's Staff

 

 

    "The staff (Danda) is symbolic for the spine supporting the body.  Since man's emergence for the animal kingdom he has walked erect.  The levels of consciousness are in the spine where the life force is dominant.  The base of the spine [Muladhara Cakra] is the place where the Kundalini Energy (Divine Coiled Serpent) is located.
    Khatvanga (Staff with Skull on Top) is symbolic of a pure or empty mind, one which is free from preconceived ideas which block the way for new perceptions, particularly Divine insight, that is, insight by intuition during meditation, reflection or quietness.  In contrast to the perconceived ideas stands true knowledge, which is knowing from personal experience.  Information is often mistaken for knowledge.  The skull is mounted on a staff (the spine).  The Kundalini Energy can then rise in the Sahasrara.  The flow of the Divine energy through the staff or spine, into the empty skull, the mind free of preconceived ideas, is an experience that shakes one's whole foundation."
-   Kundalini: Yoga for the West.  By Swami Sivananda Radha.  Timeless Books, 1978.  p.41

 

 

"With his staff across his back, he pays no heed to men;
Quickly entering the myriad peaks, he goes upon his way.
Fearsome and solitary in mien, he does not boast of himself;
But, dwelling gravely in his domain, decides who is snake, who is Dragon."
-   Zenrin Kushu, Miura and Sasaki  

 

 

"Zen Master Seung Sahn, holding up the Zen stick, asked "Do you see?"
Hitting the ground with the Zen stick, he asked "Do you hear?"
He then said, "Already you see clearly. Already you hear clearly.
Then, what are this stick, this sound and your mind?
Are they the same or different?
If you say "same," I will hit you thirty times.
If you say "different," I will also hit you thirty times.
Why?
KATZ!"
-   Zen Master Seung Sahn 

 

 

"Mayoku arrived at Shokei's place holding his staff.  He walked three times around the meditation seat of Shokei and then thumped his staff once.
Shokei said, "Right!  Right!" 
Later, Mayoku went to Nansen's place, walked three times around the meditation seat of Nansen, and then thumped his staff once.  Nansen said,
"Wrong!  Wrong!"  Mayoku asked Nansen, "Shokei said 'right.' Why do you say 'wrong?."  Nansen said, "For Shokei it is right.  For you it is wrong.  What
comes from the power of wind in the end becomes broken and crumbled."
-  Gerry Wick and Bernie Glassman, Book of Equanimity, p. 51 

 

  

"One of the standard themes of Zen art is the staff.  The staff is an all-purpose Zen tool -- a symbol of authority, a walking stick, an implement for imparting discipline.  This single-stroke Zen staff has no other writing on the paper, but it is filled with seal impressions -- one of Unmon Sokudo's (1690-1765) trademarks.  One interpretation would be that Sokudo is telling his students. "Anywhere you look, I will be there, ready to give you a good whack!""
Shambhala Publications  

 

 

"The bo, or staff, is one of the earliest tools to be used by man. Initially it may have been merely a sapling or a long, straight branch which was used for hunting animals for sources of food or fur hides. The wooden staff also facilitated passage over rugged and mountainous terrain. In an agrarian setting it served as a multi-purpose tool for planting crops, carrying supplies, and transporting buckets of water for the irrigation of crops.

In the ancient records of Chinese martial arts, the bo is discussed as the first weapon taught to the Zen Buddhist disciples who studied at the Shaolin Temple. There are literary and pictorial references to Bodhidharma carrying a bo on his journeys as he taught Zen Buddhism in the regions near the Shaolin Temple. One account from a biography on Bodhidharma tells of his death in 528 AD from the poison of a jealous monk. It is told that three years later his body was exhumed due to rumors he had been seen travelling in the mountains of Central Asia. Bodhidharma was said to carry a staff from which hung a single sandal. He had stated he was on his way back to India. When the curious monks opened his tomb, all they found inside was a single sandal. Ever since then Bodhidharma has been pictured carrying a staff from which hangs the missing sandal."
-   Sa Kwon: Chinese Bo

 

 

        

Legend of Bodhidharma's (Damo) Single Sandal on His Staff

 

 

"A monk asked Kenpo, "The one road of Nrivana leads into the ten quarters. But where does it begin?" Kenpo raised his staff and traced a horizontal line in the air. "Here." Disappointed, the monk went to Ummon and asked him the same question. Ummon held up his staff, and said: "This staff  leaps up to the 33rd heaven and hits the presiding deity on the nose, then it dives down into the Eastern Sea where it hits the holy carp. The carp becomes a dragon which then brings a flood of rain." 
List of Koans by Yunmen Wenyan 

 

 

"So I took the bright red stick and at the center of the nation's hoop I thrust it in the earth.  As it touched the earth it leaped mightily in my hand and was a waga chun, the rustling tree [cottonwood], very tall and full of leafy branches and of all birds singing.  And beneath it all the animals were mingling with the people like relatives and making happy cries.  The women raised their tremolo of joy, and the men shouted all together; "Here we shall raise our children, and be as little chickens under the mother sheo's [prairie hen] wing."  Then I heard the white wind blowing gently through the tree and singing there, and from the east the sacred pipe came flying on its eagle wings, and stopped before me there beneath the tree, spreading deep peace around it."
Black Elk Speaks, 1932, p. 29, as told to John G. Neihardt.  

 

 

"Whirled by the three passions, one's eyes go blind;
Closed to the world of things, they see again.
In this way I live; straw-hatted, staff in hand,
I move illimitably, through earth, through heaven."
-   Ungo (1580-1659)

 

 

"Jodo should be done to build one's character.  Jodo should be like a steering wheel. The road is life.  There are all kinds of ways one can go down the road.  Use Jodo to steer as straight a course as possible through life."
Sensei Shimizu Takaji

 

 

"Shuzan held out his short staff and said: "If you call this a short staff, you oppose its reality. If you do not call it a short staff, you ignore the fact. Now what do you wish to call this?"
Mumon's comment: If you call this a short staff, you oppose its reality. If you do not call it a short staff, you ignore the fact. It cannot be expressed with words and it cannot be expressed without words. Now say quickly what it is.

Holding out the short staff,
He gave an order of life or death.
Positive and negative interwoven,
Even Buddhas and patriarchs cannot escape this attack."
Mumonkan #43

Chinese Chan Buddhist Master Shoushan held up a bamboo staff before a group and said, "If you call it a bamboo staff, you are clinging.  If you do not call it a bamboo staff, you are ignoring.  So tell me, what do you call it?"  - Wumenquan, # 43.  

 

 

 

 

 

Shifu Miao Zhang Points the Way

The Wise Teacher with the Magic (Wondorous, Amazing, Powerful) Staff, Shifu Miao Zhang, 师傅妙杖

Sayings and Answers to Questions by Shifu Miao Zhang

 

 

                                      

 

 

    "Mayoku walked around his old Daoist friend, Shifu Miao Zhang (师傅妙杖), three times and then thumped his staff on the ground. 
Maio Zhang stood up, walked around Mayoku once, tapped his cane three times on the wall, and said "The power of the wind can topple trees and is gone by morning.  My cane can cut through the wind."  


Zhaozhou, who had been in poor health, asked his friend Miao Zhang, "Do the bees have Buddha nature?"  Miao Zhang smiled and said, "The roses are so fragrant today, and the cherries so sweet.  Let's walk in the garden and leave our crutches behind." 


    Gathering together in an orchard of blooming sweet lime trees, the students waited for their esteemed teacher, Kasyapa.  Slowly walking down the dirt path, relying on his danda walking staff for balance, Kasyapa joined his students.  He sat quietly for a long time, enjoying the fragrance of the lime blossoms.  Finally, he raised his danda staff.  Everyone stared at Kasyapa - serious, intent, focused, and silent.  Only Shifu Miao Zhang smiled, and then lifted his cane and pointed at a lime blossom.  Kasyapa pointed his danda at Shifu Zhang.  Another transmission was completed.  The sacred thread remained unbroken.    


    Nan-ch'uan asked Miao Zhang, "Is Ordinary Mind the Dao?"  Miao Zhang said, "No.  My mind is not ordinary, so the Dao is a dream within a dream.  My cane is ordinary, so it walks with me along the Watercourse Way, pointing to the Abode of the Dao in the new forest."  


    Zen Master Seung Sahn held up his staff in front of old Shifu Miao Zhang, and said "Then, Miao Zhang, what are this staff, this sound and your mind?  Are they the same or different?  If you say "same," I will hit you thirty times.  If you say "different," I will also hit you thirty times. Why?"
Miao Zhang lifted his cane slowly, grounded himself, prepared to block a strike and then said, "Don't know! Same or different, nobody can hit the sound of our minds." 


    Zen Master Shuzan held out his short staff in front of his Daoist friend, Shifu Miao Zhang, and said "If you call this a short staff, you oppose its reality and are clinging. If you do not call it a short staff, then you ignore the fact. Now what do you wish to call this?"
Miao Zhang smiled, dropped and pointed to his cane, and said "Yesterday it was a wooden walking stick that helped without speaking.  Tomorrow it may become firewood, crackling in the flames." 


    Zen Master Yunmen Wenyan and Shifu Miao Zhang were walking together in the hills behind the monastery one cloudy autumn afternoon.  It began to rain steadily on the two old friends.  Yunmen said, “My staff has changed into a dragon and is swallowing up the heaven and earth.  So, my friend, where do mountains, rainfall, rivers and the great earth come from?”
Miao Zhang was quiet for awhile, stopped on the trail, and then held his cane in his hand with the tip pointing to the sky.  He said, “Yunmen, as for the source of their coming, the tip of my cane points to the fecund depths of vast emptiness, the crook end to the endless inter-marriages of ten thousand realities, and my hand grasps the heartwood of the ordinary mind.  So, my friend, Yunmen, where are they all going?”


   Xita asked Shifu Miao Zhang,
"What is sudden enlightenment?"  Shifu Zhang threw his staff on the muddy ground.  Xita asked Miao Zhang, "What is gradual enlightenment?"  Shifu Zhang stomped on his staff three times. 


    Zen Master Ummon held up his staff in front of his Daoist friend, Shifu Miao Zhang, and said "This staff leapt up to the Eighth Heaven into the hands of the lame Zhong Kui who used it to awaken the Green Dragon in the Eastern Sea."
Miao Zhang said, "Ummon your poetry is lovely, but my gnarled cane cannot hear you."


    Toju Zenchu brandished his staff before Daoist Shifu Miao Zhang and challenged him "Miao Zhang, speak and you get whacked with Nanten's staff.  Do not speak and you still get whacked with Nanten's staff."
Shifu Zhang stood up quickly, lifted his cane strongly in defense, and quietly said, "Yunmen's shit stick stinks and Nanten's staff is cracked!  I am leaving now to take my evening walk. Goodbye." 

-  Michael P. Garofalo, Shifu Miao Zhang Points the Way  

  

Hakuin's Dragon Staff Inka Scroll

Zen Master Hakuin (1686-1768) painted a Dragon Staff with horsehair whisk attached.  
He would give this painting to his lay students who passed the Zen koan,
"What is the sound of one hand clapping."

 

 

 

 

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Workshops, Seminars, Retreats, Demonstrations in 2013
Cane, Jo, Walking Stick, Short Staff

What, Where, When, Who??  Send information to Mike Garofalo and I will list here. 

 

 

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Techniques
Martial Arts Techniques for Short Staff and Cane:

Using One Hand or Two Hands on the Wooden Stick
Strikes, Swing Strikes, Chops, Crook Strikes, Pokes, Punches, Jabs
Blocks, Sweeps, Pull Downs, Spinning and Twirling
Instructional Tips, Tools, and Suggestions

 

1.  General Techniques

 

Martial Arts Techniques for the Cane and Short Staff.  By Michael P. Garofalo, M.S., Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Red Bluff, California.  Includes Strikes, Blocks, Sweeps, Chops, Crook Strikes, Pokes, Punches, Jabs, Pull Downs, Spinning and Twirling.  This document provides a bibliography, links, and resources.  The document includes a brief description for each short staff and/or cane technique.  Specific citations to standard reference works are provided for techniques.  Directional schemes, counting in various languages, and various school charts for staff or cane techniques.  Under development in 2009; and new items added weekly. 384Kb+ in PDF Read Only Format.      


Way of the Short Staff.  By Michael P. Garofalo, M.S.  Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Red Bluff, California.  A detailed and annotated guide, bibliographies, lists of links, resources, instructional media, online videos, and lessons.  Includes numerous lists of movements for short staff forms, e.g., Eight Immortals Cane I form, Northern Energy Taiji Cane form, Wudang Tiger Tail short staff form, Chen Taijiquan short staff form, etc.  A comprehensive guide to the practice of the short staff, cane, jo, walking stick, gun, zhang, whip staff, 13 Hands Staff, and related wood short staff weapons.  Includes use of the short staff and cane in martial arts, self-defense, walking and hiking.  Separate sections on Aikido Jo, Cane, Taijiquan cane and staff, Jodo, exercises with a short staff, selected quotations, techniques, selecting and purchasing a short staff, tips and suggestions, and a long section on the lore, legends, and magick of the short staff.  Includes "Shifu Miao Zhang Points the Way."  Updated on a regular basis since October 2008.  File size: 355Kb.  Related to Mike's popular webpage on the Staff.

 

 

2.  Directional Schemes

Here is the directional scheme that I use when describing a sequence of movements.  I always assume that you start the sequence facing to the North, facing the 12 o'clock direction, or facing N12.  In my webpage on the subject, I give alternative directional schemes. 

 

3.  Counting

 

Number English Japanese Chinese Chinese Spanish French German
               
1 One Ichi
 
Uno Un Eins
 
2 Two Ni Èr Dos Deux Zwei
 
3 Three San Sān Tres Trois Drei
 
4 Four Shi Quatro Quarte Vier
 
5 Five Go Cinco Cinq Fünf
 
6 Six Roku Liù Seis Six Sechs
 
7 Seven Shichi

Siete Sept Sieben
 
8 Eight Hachi

Ocho Huit Acht
 
9 Nine Kyu

Jiǔ

Nueve Neuf Neun
 
10 Ten Ju Shí

Diez Dix Zehn
 

 

 

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Red Bluff, Tehama County, North Sacramento Valley, Northern California, U.S.A.
Cities in the area: Oroville, Paradise, Durham, Chico, Hamilton City, Orland, Willows, Corning,
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This webpage was last modified or updated on March 25, 2014.     

This webpage was first posted on the Internet in April of 2007. 

 

 

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