Yang Style Taijiquan Long Form

Yang Cheng-Fu's (1883-1936) T'ai Chi Ch'uan Long Empty Hand Form circa 1925
Internal Martial Arts and Mind-Body Training

Introduction     Bibliography     Links     List of Movements     Instructions     Quotations

Yang Cheng Fu     Yang Taijiquan     Online Videos     Classics

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Research by

Michael P. Garofalo


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Introduction to Yang Style Taijiquan

 

    The Yang Style of Taijiquan is the most popular and widespread version of T'ai Chi Ch'uan (Grand Ultimate Boxing) practiced by both individuals and groups at the beginning of the 21st century.  Millions of students, avid players, advanced practitioners, experts and teachers practice the Yang style of Taijiquan in every country in the world.  Every day, these health conscious persons enjoy and benefit, both in body and in mind, from these gentle to vigorous exercises, subtle self-defense techniques, mind-body rejuvenation methods, playful postures, choreography challenges, and the subtle pleasures of doing taijiquan in the Yang style.            


    The Yang style Taijiquan internal martial arts have evolved over the last 160  years as they have been successfully transplanted around the world by their creative and multi-talented  teachers.  Numerous scholars and professionals have been attracted to this internal martial arts form, to its philosophy, for its personal health benefits, and by its charismatic teachers.  These teachers have helped spread Yang style Taijiquan worldwide by practicing the art, forming clubs and schools, conducting workshops, traveling, producing media, and teaching enthusiastically.  They have published articles, essays, translations, biographies, textbooks, instructional manuals, commentaries, reminiscences, and guidebooks.  They have taught on television, videotapes, and now DVDs and VCDs.  


    The Yang family members lived in northern China, and many persons contributed to the development and teaching of this Yang style of T'ai Chi Ch'uan.  The first person that developed this style of Taijiquan was the illustrious and creative Yang Lu-Chan (1799-1872).  He studied Shaolin Kung Fu and the Chen Family style Taijiquan in his youth, moved to Beijing, and then developed the Yang style of Taijiquan.  "At that time, people named this art Zhan Mian Quan (cotton boxing), Ruan Quan (soft boxing), or Hua Quan (transformation boxing)" [Fu Zhongwen, 1963]  His second son, Yang Ban Hou (1837-1892) was a highly skilled martial artist and fighter.  His third son, Yang Jiang-Hou (1839-1917) modified his father's style of Taiji and was an expert with weapons like the spear and staff.  Yang Jiang-Hou had two sons who continued to teach and modify the Yang Family style of Taiji: Yang Chao-Hsiung (1862-1930) and the famous Yang Cheng-Fu (1883-1936) who is also known as Yang Chao-Chin.  The Yang style really gained widespread popularity because of the teaching of Yang Cheng-Fu, the Yang family members teaching in southern China, Hong Kong and Taiwan, and the many fine students of Yang Cheng-Fu, such as: the noted author Cheng Man-Chi'ng (1901-1975), the author Fu Zhong-Wen (1903-1994), the author Tung Ying-Chieh (1890-1964),  the author Chen Wei-Ming (1881-1958), Zhao Bin-Fu, Zhang Qing-Lin, Li Chun-Nian, Wang Ting-Xing, Yang Sau-Chung (1910-1985), Hu Yuen-Chou, and others.  Yang Cheng-Fu's three sons also taught his Yang Family system: Yang Zhen-Ming (1911-1985), Yang Zhen-Ji (1922-), and Yang Zhen-Duo (1926-).  Yang Zhen-Duo's grandson, Yang Jun, continues the Yang Family teaching traditions in Seattle in 2009.    


    Yang style Taijiquan is a complex martial art with many levels.  The long hand form is emphasized in this document.  The form is practiced most often for its gentle cultivation of inner strength, its calming effects, its health benefits, and its graceful and beautiful choreography.  However, with proper instruction from a qualified teacher, good physical conditioning, and dedicated practice partners, its close fighting martial aspects can be explored to great depths.  The Yang style of internal martial arts includes short hand forms, a fast hand form, a sword form, a saber form, a staff form, two person practice sets, drills, push hands practice and competition, and sparring.  There is a considerable body of literature about the Yang style of internal martial arts, with many practical, cultural, health enhancing, Daoist, and philosophical insights for scholarly enthusiasts.  Yang Taijiquan practitioners are serious folks amongst the internal martial arts practitioners.   
 

    [Personally, I vary my Taiji practice quite a bit.  I'm a cross training enthusiast, at 69 years of age.  When practicing solo, I vary the Yang Style stance heights from a high, medium or low stance level.  I move at high, medium, slow or very slow speeds.  I explode some of the moves with high or medium striking power like they do in Chen style.  Sometimes, when tired or just waking up, I just move ever so slowly through the postures, gentle, soft, like clouds slowly changing shapes.  When I teach, I mostly move at slow to medium speed, keep high and stable stances, and show no explosive moves.  The only weapon I practice with daily is a 40" long oak curved neck cane.] 


    Yang style Taijiquan, as a internal martial art (Nei Jia Quan), is grounded in a group of core practice principles: relaxation (Song),  circular movements, martial applications, rooting (Gen), moving from the waist (Yao), chi and springy (Jin) energies, softness (Rou), fluidity and expansiveness, vital energy on the move, good timing and coordination, fullness and emptiness, deep and coordinated breathing, becoming calm and quiet (Jing), mind/intent (Yi) leading bodily movements, and other principles found in the Taiji Classics.  


    Most new students learning the long hand form need careful and specific instructions from a instructor that knows the form.  If you can learn 3 new movements each week, it will take you about 6 months to learn to perform the entire form in your solo practice; and many years to learn about the nuances, philosophy, history, and applications of the Yang Taijiquan long form.  Some beginning students benefit from having a written list of the movements to help them remember the sequence, direction, and some of the nuances of the posture.  Some students need someone to talk them through the postures many times before they can commit the sequence to memory.  Some students without access to teachers do make steady progress on their own using videotapes, DVDs and books; and then advance their knowledge by attending workshops and seminars on the form.  Everyone, of course, needs to practice on their own each day in order to make any real progress in mastering this long hand form.  Students will have different learning styles, and successful teachers will use a variety of teaching styles to facilitate efficient and effective learning.  


In order to provide readers with a good idea about the Yang style long hand taijiquan form, I have studied a number of books, videotapes, and DVDs teaching the movements in the Yang Family Taijiquan long hand form - the one popularized by Yang Cheng-Fu (1883-1936).  The third published book version in 1931 by Yang Cheng-Fu of his Taijiquan hand form had a series of 85 movements; and the fourth book published in 1934, titled "The Essence and Applications of Taijiquan," edited by Cheng Man-Chi'ng, had the same series with 94 numbered movements.  The sequence of movements in the 88 movement Yang style long form are also clearly described and illustrated in the book "Mastering Yang Style Taijiquan" by Fu Zhong-Wen (1963, 1999).  The 88 movement Yang style long form described by Zhang Fuxing (1996) is very similar to that described by Fu Zhong-Wen.  The 108 movement Yang style long form as outlined below seems to me to be substantially the same as the 105 movement Yang style long form pictured by Jou, Tsung-Hwa  (1980), the detailed 150 movement instruction guide by T. T. Liang and S.A. Olsen (1992), the carefully photographed and brief descriptions of the Yang style long form movements presented in the book edited by John Little and Curtis Wong (2000), and the 103 movement form described and illustrated by Yang Zhen-Duo, Yang Chen-Fu's son, in "Yang Style Taijiquan" (1996).  Although this Yang style long hand form taijiquan sequence is numbered differently by these knowledgeable teachers, the essential Yang style forms (postures) and sequence and flow of the forms (postures) are all nearly identical.  


Instructional videotapes or DVDs or VCDs for the 108 movement Yang style long form are now widely available.  One can study this popular Taijiquan form using useful instructional videotapes or DVDs produced by Terence Dunn, Lu Gui Rong, Yu Cheng Hsiang, Ye Xiao Long, Jiang Jian-ye, Fong Ha, Alex Dong, Michael Chan, Erle Montaigue, Yang Jwing-Ming, Jesse Tsao, Yang Zhen Duo and Yang Jun, and many others.   


All of the instructional resources, books, DVDs and videotapes, mentioned on this webpage are cited in the detailed bibliography provided below.  Readers are also referred to my bibliography in the Cloud Hands website for related resources.


There has been a general trend to developing shorter and simplified versions of the T'ai Chi Ch'uan long hand forms.  Advocates of longer forms and purists sometimes criticize this development on the grounds that the shorter forms are less physically demanding, are not long enough to allow for the relaxation response to come into play, omit movements that develop both sides of the body, omit important movements with good martial applications, and stray from the "traditions" of long boxing.  The long form can be divided into three sections (#1-#17, #18-#55, #56-#108), so it already has shorter versions built it, when time does not permit practice of the entire form.  Advocates for both long and short versions argue that shorter forms allow new students to progress to longer forms in a more satisfactory and efficient manner, provide an alternative for busy persons, provide short versions for competition, and can give a taste of the style to students wishing to study more than one family style (Yang, Chen, Wu, Wu-Hao, or Sun) before they invest time in learning the long form of a particular style.  There are numerous shorter versions of the Yang style of Taijiquan: the Beijing Short Form standard simplified 24 movement version in the Yang style, the Cheng Man-ching 37 movement simplified Taiji form in a modified Yang style, the 42 movement Yang style competition form developed by the Chinese National Wushu Association, a 48 movement Yang style version by the Chinese National Athletic Association, and a delightful fast set version of Yang style Taijiquan as taught by Master Dong Ying-jie.   


Best wishes for success in learning to perform this beautiful T'ai Chi Ch'uan Yang style long hand form.  Enjoy yourself!  May you have the strength and skills to Ward-Off the real dangers to your mindfulness and well being, the will to Repulse the Monkey of laziness, and the desire to Embrace the Tiger of inner power.  I hope you can go on to have a long and healthy life to delight in the playful art of Moving Hands Like Clouds

 

      

       White Crane Cools Its Wings

-  Mike Garofalo, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yang Cheng-Fu, 1883-1936

Yang Cheng-Fu, 1883-1936
The very influential Yang style Taijiquan teacher in China.
Creator of the popular Yang Style Long Form

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bibliography and Links
Yang Style T'ai Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)

 

Advanced Yang Style Tai Chi Chuan.  Volume One: Tai Chi Theory and Tai Chi Jing.  By Dr. Yang, Jwing-Ming.  Boston, Massachusetts, Yang's Martial Arts Academy, YMAA, 1986.  Glossary, 276 pages.  ISBN: Unknown.  VSCL. 


Advanced Yang Style Tai Chi Chuan.  Volume Two: Martial Applications.  By Dr. Yang, Jwing-Ming.  Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts, Yang's Martial Arts Academy, YMAA, 1986.  Glossary, 246 pages.  ISBN: Unknown.   


Alphabetical Index to Cloud Hands Website   

 

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American Yangjia Michuan Taijiquan Association   


An Anthology of Yang Style Tai Chi Chuan.  By Ted Knecht.  Electronic book format.  Yongnian Taiji Martial Arts, 2002.  213 pages.  


Application Methods of Taijiquan, by Yang, Chengfu, 1931, refer below to "Taijiquan Shiyong Fa."


Authentic Yang Family Tai Chi.   By Fu Sheng Yuan.  ISBN: 06462232584.  


Knud Eric Anderson's T'ai Chi Ch'uan Institute


Authentic Yang Family Tai Chi.  By Fu Sheng Yuan.  Edited by Fu Zhong Wen.  196 pages.  ISBN: 0646232584.


Authentic Yang Style Tai Chi Chuan.  Instructional videotape.  Features Fu Sheng Yuan, 5th generation Yang style, and son of the famous Fu Zhong Wen (1904-1994).  


What Yang Style Taijiquan Books or Videos or DVDs Do I Recommend?


Ba Gua Zhang: Bibliography, Links, Resources, Quotes, Notes.  


The Before Heaven 16-Posture I Ching T'ai Chi Form (Hsien T'ien T'ai Chi).  16-Posture T'ai Chi According to the Interaction of the Eight Trigram Images.  Developed by Stuart Alve Olson.  Published in 2001, pp. 127-199, in T'ai Chi According to the I Ching: Embodying the Principles of the Book of ChangesCheng Man-ch'ing (1901-1975)   Links, bibliography, a list of the movements in the 37 movements short form of Master Cheng, quotations, and notes.  This short form is very similiar to the first section of the Yang style 108 long form.  This book is one of the best studies on the relation of the Tai Chi Chuan form to the I Ching, Book of Changes.  


The Best Books, Videos, and DVDs on Yang Style Taijiquan Long Form


"Big Circle and Small Circle T'ai Chi."  Interview with Lu Gui Rong by George Xu, edited by Marvin Smalheiser.  T'ai Chi, Vol. 25, No. 2, April, 2001, pp. 10-16.    


Breathing Exercises and Chi (Qi)


"A Brief Introduction to Yang Family 88 Taiji San-Shou."   By Key Sun and Leroy Clark.   T'ai Chi: The International Magazine of T'ai Chi Ch'uan, Vol. 27, No. 6, December, 2003, pp. 48- 55.  Includes 88 color photographs to two players doing the form.  


Chang San-feng (circa 1300 CE)  Master Chang was believed to be the creator of the internal art of Taijiquan.  This webpage includes a bibliography, links, quotes, notes, legends and lore, 45 Kb.  He is a patron Saint of Taijiquan, and his birthday, April 9th, is often a time of festivities in taiji clubs.   


Cheng Man-ch'ing (1901-1975)   Links, bibliography, a list of the movements in the 37 movement short form of Master Cheng, quotations, and notes.  Master Cheng was a medical doctor, author, painter, teacher, and Taiji and sword master.  He was a student of Yang Cheng-Fu (1883-1936).  Master Cheng was a very influential Yang style teacher in New York in the 1960's.  


Cheng Tzu's Thirteen Treatises on Tai Chi Chuan
.  By Cheng Man-ch'ing.  Translated by Benjamin Lo and Martin Inn.  Berkeley, North Atlantic Books, 1985.  223 pages.  ISBN: 0938190458.


Chen Style of T'ai Chi Ch'uan   Links, bibliography, quotes, notes.  


Chen Style Taijiquan: The Source of Taiji Boxing.  By Davidine Siaw-Voon Sim and David Gaffney.  Berkeley, CA, North Atlantic Books, 2002.  Index, charts, 224 pages.  ISBN: 1556433778.   Provides an excellent introduction to Chen style Taijiquan history and legends, outlines the major forms, discusses the philosophy and foundations 
of the art, and gives very good information on training methods, push hands, and weapons.  VSCL. 


Chen Wei-Ming (1881-1958)  Student of Yang Cheng-Fu.  Compiler and editor of Yang Cheng-Fu's 1931 book:  Chen Weiming was an editor working for the "Qing Dynasty History Institute" in Shanghai.    


Chen, William C. C. - Tai Chi, New York


"Chen Yanling on Practice"  Translated by Alex Yeo.  Chen Yanling was also known as Chen Gong, Chen Kung or Yearning K. Chen.  Tai Chi International Magazine, Vol. 27, No. 4, August 2003, pp. 36- 40. 


Chinese Tai Chi Chuan Association of Canada


Chi Kung (Qigong) Energy Cultivation


Chi (QI) Energy Cultivation - Breathing Exercises   


China's Living Treasures: Tai Chi, Parts 1  and 2.  Featuring Fu Zhong Wen, Fu Sheng Yuan, and Low Gao Ming.  Available from One Hand Video.  


Classical Tai Chi Sword, List of Movements, Yang Style, 55 Movements, Valley Spirit Taijiquan List,.Detailed, 38 pages  


Classical Tai Chi Sword, List of Movements, Yang Style, 55 Movements, Valley Spirit Taijiquan List, Simple List, 2 pages  


Classical Tai Chi Chuan Sword, Taijiquan Jian 55 in the Yang Style: Comparison of Names or Descriptions for the 55 Movements.  Green Way Research, Red Bluff, California, January 2008.  By Michael P. Garofalo.  This document includes a detailed listing of the names or brief descriptions of the 55 movements of the Classical Taijiquan Straight Sword Form in the Yang Style of Taijiquan.  This document includes names or brief descriptions for each movement in English, Romanized Chinese (Pinyin and/or Wade Giles), Chinese characters, Spanish, French, German, and Japanese.  The document includes source citations and a bibliography.  In PDF format, print only, 280Kb, 38 pages:
Webpage: http://www.egreenway.com/taichichuan/Classical Taijiquan Yang Sword Form 55 List Detailed.pdf 


Classics of T'ai Chi Ch'uan   


Cloud Hands Blog: Taijiquan and Qigong   

Cloud Hands Blog


Cloud Hands: Taijiquan and Qigong   Guides, bibliographies, links, resources, quotes.


Combat Techniques of Taiji, Xing Yi, and Bagua: Principles and Practices of Internal Martial Arts.  By Lu Shengli.  Translated and Edited by Zhang Yun and Susan Darley.  Berkeley, California, Blue Snake Books, 2006. 369 pages.  ISBN:9583941452.  General history and principles of 3 internal arts, basic movements, basic gongfu training techniques, and a detailed description with photographs of the Sixteen-Posture form (pp. 231-356).  VSCL. 


Combat Yang Taijiquan.   By Peter Lim Tian Tek.  23Kb.  


Comments and Notes about the Practice of Yang Style Taijiquan


A Comparative Study Between the Traditional Yang Style of Yang Chengfu and Cheng Man Ching's Style.   By J. Justin Meehan.   20Kb+


Comparison of 108 Long Yang with 88 Long Yang - Chart


The Complete Book of Tai Chi Chuan: A Comprehensive Guide to the Principles and Practice.  By Wong Kiew Kit.  Shaftesbury, Dorset, Element, 1996.  Index, bibliography, 316 pages.  ISBN: 1852307927.  The Yang long form is covered on pp. 204 -228.  It is an 85 movement form by Yang Deng Fu and a list of the movements as well as detailed line drawings of the form are provided.  The book also has examples of many martial applications.  VSCL. 


The Complete Idiot's Guide to Tai Chi and Qigong.  By Bill Douglas.  Alpha Books, 2002, 2nd Edition.  368 pages.  ISBN: 0028642643.  VSCL. 


"Cultivating Jing, Qi and Yi."   By Paul Lam, M.D..  T'ai Chi: The International Magazine of T'ai Chi Ch'uan.  Vol. 27, No. 2, April 2003, pp. 36-38..  


Cultivating the Chi: The Secrets of Energy and Vitality.   Compiled and translated by Stuart Alve Olson.   Revised and expanded third edition.   Chen Kung Series, Volume One.  St. Paul, Minnesota, Dragon Door Publications, 1993.  Index, 166 pages.  ISBN:  0938045113.  VSCL.     


Da Lu (Two Person Practice Sets) - Yang Style   


Dao (Saber, Broadsword) and Taijiquan   Bibliography, links, resources, quotes, notes.


The Development of Taijiquan Styles - Lineage Charts.  Al Duncan.


Discourse about Jing.   By Zhang Yi Zun.   


Dong Family International Tai Chi Chuan Association   Grand Master Dong Zhen-Chen, Hawaii.


Dong Family Orthodox Yang Style Long Form and Fast Form   Master Alex Dong.  Includes both the Yang style slow form and the fast form.  A demonstration video is available.  It features four generations of the Dong Family: Dong (Tung) Ying Chieh, Dong Hu (Tung Fu) Ling, and Dong Zeng Chen performing the 108 sequence of Yang style taijiquan.  


Dong Yingjie (Tung Ying-Chieh) (1890-1964)  Noted student of Yang, Cheng-Fu.  Dong wrote the 1931 book on "Application Methods of Taijiquan" for Yang, Cheng-Fu.  


Drawing Silk: Master's Secrets for Successful Tai Chi Practice.  By Paul B. Gallagher.  Fairview, North Carolina, 2007.  Bibliography, 246 pages.  ISBN: 9781419663123.  Numerous classics and Taoist tales and lore are included in this text.  Originally published in 1988.  VSCL. 


Eight Section Brocade Qigong   By Michael P. Garofalo.  Provides information about the history and purpose of this popular Chi Kung practice.  Detailed descriptions are provided for each of the eight movements; including information on movement variations, health benefits, qigong meaning, and cautions.  The document includes the most extensive bibliography, link guide, and comments on Ba Duan Jin Qigong resources available anywhere.  Some animated graphics are provided in linked files.  This document is updated as new information is discovered.  Many Yang style players warm up with the Eight Section Brocade.  


The Essence and Applications of Taijiquan.  By Yang, Cheng-Fu (1883-1936).  Translated by Louis Swaim.  The original publication date was in 1934.  The original book was edited by Professor Cheng Man-Chi'ng.  Berkeley, California, North Atlantic Books, 2005.  Introduction, appendices, bibliography, 124 pages.  ISBN: 1556435452.  VSCL.   


The Essence of T'ai Chi Ch'uan: The Literary Tradition.  Translated and edited by Benjamin Pang Jeng Lo; Martin Inn, Robert Amacker, and Susan Foe.  Berkeley, California, North Atlantic Books, 1979, 1985.  100 pages.  ISBN: 0913028630.  VSCL.     


Evolution of the Yang School of Tai Chi Chuan.  By Gu Liuxin. 


Exposition of Insights Into the Practice of the Thirteen Postures.  By Wu, Yu-hsiang.  6Kb.


Fast Form - Yang Style  Tung Ying-Chieh = Dong Ying-Jie ??  [Wu Ta-yeh said that prior to 1914 Yang Cheng-fu would practice one round of his form 
in less than 9 minutes with brisk kicks and some fa-jing.  Ah - Youth!  Yang Chen-fu would have been 29 years old in 1912.]


"We all know that Tai Chi is practiced slowly, but slow is a relative term. Tai Chi can certainly be practiced at variable speeds which may be slow, slower, slower yet, extremely slow, or, alternately, less slow, less than slow, accelerated, or Oh my God, did you see that?  Yes, its true; in addition to the more common slow practices, there are Tai Chi fast forms that can accelerate to a point that they rival the speed of any other martial art. Tai Chi is usually practiced slowly, but nowhere is it 
written that Tai Chi can only be practiced slowly."   
-  John Loupos, Exploring Tai Chi

 


Feedback or complaints about this webpage?   


First Section Notes    By Sifu Toni DeMoulin.


First Yang Style   Interview with Chang Yiu-Chun in 1970's.  13Kb.  


What Yang Style Taijiquan Books or Videos or DVDs Do I Recommend?


Five Animal Frolics (Wu Qin Xi): Tiger, Bear, Crane, Deer, and Monkey   


Fu Zhong-Wen (1903-1994)


"Generating Internal Energy."   Interview with Yang Zhenduo by Chris Pei, edited by Marvin Smalheiser.  T'ai Chi: The International Magazine 
of T'ai Chi Ch'uan
.  Vol. 18, No. 5, October, 1994, pp. 4-10.  


"Getting All Parts to Work Together."   By Mark Wasson.   T'ai Chi: The International Magazine of T'ai Chi Ch'uan.  Vol. 27, No. 4, August, 
2003, pp. 41-44.  


Glossary of Sun Taijiquan Terms and Movement Names in English and Chinese  


Glossary of Tai Chi Chuan (Taijiquan)   In English and Chinese.  By Mike Garofalo 


Green Way Research    Red Bluff, California.  


Guang Ping Yang Tai Chi Chuan Japan.   By D. D. Harrington.  Informative articles.


Guang Ping Yang Taijiquan of Kuo Lien Ying   


Handbook of T'ai Chi Ch'uan Exercises.  By Zhang, Fuxing.  York Beach, Maine, Samuel Weiser, Inc., 1996.  Index, 198 pages.  ISBN: 0877288917.   Includes a detailed description and line drawings of the Simplified 24 Movement Yang style short form, and the standard traditional 88 movement Yang style long form.   Information on major characteristics of Yang style, key points of practice, and push hands.  VSCL. 


The History and Origin of Yang Style Taijiquan - Introduction and Details


History of Tai Chi Chuan.  Harvey Kurland.  56Kb. 


"History of the Yang Style Taijiquan."  By Fu Zhongwen and Dr. Mei Ying Sheng.  Compiled by Ted W. Knecht.  T'ai Chi, Vol. 18, No. 4, August, 1994, pp. 16-19.  


How Do I Go About Purchasing These Books and Videotapes?


How the Moves Are Counted: A Comparison of 108 Long Yang with 88 Long Yang - Chart


"Illustrated Explanation of Taijiquan Forms."  By Xu, Loung Hou.  Published in 1921.  Xu was a student of Yang Jian Hou, Yang Cheng-Fu's father.   This was the first widely read book on the subject of Taijiquan.    


"Imagery for Taiji Stance and Stepping."  By Martin Mellish.  Found in the magazine: Qi: The Journal of Tranditional Eastern Health and Fitness, Volume 16, No. 1, Spring, 2006, pp. 44-49.   


"The Importance of Brush Knee Practice."  By Gerald A. Sharp.  T'ai Chi, Vol. 25, No. 2, April, 2001, pp. 31-34.  


International Center for the Healing Arts.  Port Townsend, WA.  Michael Gilman  Yang style Taijiquan hand and weapons forms.   Instructional videotapes and DVDs, and numerous excellent on-line classes are offered.  Detailed long form instructional resources.  


The Intrinsic Energies of T'ai Chi Ch'uan
.  Compiled and translated by Stuart Alve Olson.  Chen Kung Series, Volume Two.   Saint Paul, Minnesota, Dragon Door Publications, 1994.  Index, 194 pages.  ISBN: 093804513X.  VSCL. 


Jian (Sword) - Yang Style:  Links, bibliography, quotes, notes.


Kuo Lien Ying (1895-1984)     


Kwang Ping Taijiquan of Kuo Lien Ying (1895-1984)     


Lesson with the Great William C. C. Chen   By Robert Dreeben.   22Kb.  

 

 

 


List of Movements in Yang Style Long Hand Form
Created by Yang Cheng-Fu (1883-1936)

Notes for students of taijiquan instructor Michael P. Garofalo, M.S., Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Red Bluff, California.   

 

First Section,  Movements 1-17,  List of Movements


First Section List,  Movements 1-17,  Yang Long Form 108   

    Provides a list with the number of the movement and the name of movement. In the PDF format (print only), 1 page, 16Kb.  


First Section List,  Part I,  Movements 1 - 17,  Yang Long Form 108 

    Provides a list with the number of the movement, the direction one is facing at the end of that movement, the name of the movement, and a brief description or notes about the movement.  In the PDF format (print only), 1 page, 48Kb.  In the HTML format provided below in this document.  


Comparison of 108 Long Yang with 88 Long Yang - Chart

    Comments about numbering the movements in this form are found below.  

 

Second Section,  Movements 56-82,  List of Movements

 

Second Section List,  Movements 18-55,  Yang Long Form 108

    Provides a list with the number of the movement and the name of movement.  In the PDF format (print only), 1 page, 16Kb.  


Second Section List,  Part I,  Movements 18 - 37,  Yang Long Form 108 

    Provides a list with the number of the movement, the direction one is facing at the end of that movement, the name of the movement, and a brief description or notes about the movement.  In the PDF format (print only), 1 page, 53Kb.  In the HTML format provided below in this document.  


Seond Section List,  Part II,  Movements 38 - 55,  Yang Long Form 108

    Provides a list with the number of the movement, the direction one is facing at the end of that movement, the name of the movement, and a brief description or notes about the movement.  In the PDF format (print only), 1 page, 48Kb.  In the HTML format provided below in this document.  


Comparison of 108 Long Yang with 88 Long Yang - Chart

 


Third Section,  Movements 55-108,  List of Movements


Third Section List ,  Movements 55-108,  Yang Long Form 108 

    Provides a list with the number of the movement and the name of movement.  In the PDF format (print only), 1 page, 26Kb.


Third Section List,  Part I,  Movements 56 - 82,  Yang Long Form 108
   

    Provides a list with the number of the movement, the direction one is facing at the end of that movement, the name of the movement, and a brief description or notes about the movement.  In the PDF format (print only), 1 page, 65Kb.  In the HTML format provided below in this document.  


Third Section List,  Part II,  Movements 83 - 108,  Yang Long Form 108.   

    Provides a list with the number of the movement, the direction one is facing at the end of that movement, the name of the movement, and a brief description or notes about the movement.  In the PDF format (print only), 1 page, 63Kb.  In the HTML format provided below in this document.  


Comparison of 108 Long Yang with 88 Long Yang - Chart

 

 


Little Mountain Tai Chi Club
   Good articles on Yang Cheng-fu.  


"Li Yaxuan's Yang Style."  An interview with Chen Longxiang, longtime student of Li Yaxuan.  Translated by Yan Shufan.  Tai Chi International Magazine, Vol. 27, No. 3, June 2003, p. 21-25.


"A Look at the T'ai Chi Hand."   By Michael Gilman.  Tai Chi International Magazine, Vol. 24, No. 1, February 2000, p. 39-42.  "The hands contain over one quarter of all the bones of the body.  One sixth of all the muscles of the body are used in hand movements.  A single hand movement can involve as many as 50 muscles working together.  There are as many as 21,000 sensors of heat, pressure, and pain per square inch of the fingertips.  The hands can destroy or heal, cause pleasure or pain."   


Lost T'ai-chi Classics from the Late Ch'ing Dynasty.  By Douglas Wile.  State University of New York Press, 1996.  ISBN: 079142653X.  Index, charts, bibliography, 233 pages.  The most detailed and scholarly account of Tai Chi Chuan classics available.  Analysis and translation of many new texts.  Outstanding contribution!  VSCL.    


The Martial and the Civil in Yang Style Taijiquan   


Master Chang San-Feng (circa 1300 CE)


Master Cheng Man-ch'ing (1901-1975)


Master Sun Lu-Tang (1861-1933)


Mastering Yang Style Taijiquan.  Bu Fu Zongwen (1903-1994).  Translated by Louis Swaim.  Berkeley, California, North Atlantic Books, 1999.  Glossary, bibliography, 226 pages.  Translations of many Tai Chi classics are included.  A list of the 85 movement long form and detailed notes and descriptions of each movement are provided.  251 movement analysis illustrations.  Over 76 of the illustrations are traced and drawn from photographs of Yang Cheng-Fu.  Detailed descriptions of the long form, pp. 26-162.  Push hands information.  Yang Tai Chi essentials.  ISBN: 1556433182.  I have found this to be an excellent book!  This book was first published in 1963 in China as "Yang Shi Taijiquan".  An informative
introduction and good translation by Louis Swaim.  VSCL.    

 

 

 

Yang Lu-Chan, 1799-1872

Yang Lu-Chan, 1799-1872
Founder of Yang Style Taijiquan
Grandfather of Yang Cheng-Fu

 

 

 

Nei Jia Quan: Internal Martial Arts Teachers of Tai Ji Quan, Xing Yi Quan and Ba Gua Zhang.  Edited by Jess O'Brien.  Berkeley, California, North Atlantic Books, 2004.  326 pages.  ISBN: 1556435061.   Description.  Extended interviews with Tim Cartmell, Gabriel Chin, Gail Derin-Kellog, Bruce K. Frantzis, Paul Gale, Fong Ha, William Lewis, Luo De Xiu, Allen Pittman, James Wing Woo, Tony Yang, Zhao Da Yuan, and Albert Liu.  VSCL. 


Northern California, Oregon and Washington Taijiquan Teachers' Directory  


Notes on the Yang Style Taijiquan: Theory, History and Practice.  By Michael P. Garofalo.


Old Yang Taijiquan  A fairly extensive website in a European language - Polish?  A fine recommended links webpage included.  


Old Style T'ai Chi Ch'uan     By Erle Montaigue.  


101 Reflections on Tai Chi Chuan
.  A Motivational Pocket Guide for Tai Chi Chuan.  By Michael Gilman.  Boston, MA, YMAA Publication Center, 2000.  114 pages.  ISBN: 1886960868.  Mr. Gilman has many books, online articles, and videotapes for learning Yang style Taiji.  VSCL. 


On Tai Chi Chuan.   By T.Y. Pang.  Tai Chi School of Philosphy and Art, 1988.  325 pages.  ISBN: 0961207019.  


The Origin and Development of Yang Style.  By Alex Yeo.  Part 1.  Introduction, Yang Luchan (1799-1872).  Tai Chi, June 2003, Volume 26, Number 3, pp 41-46.  Part 2 Part 3.  The Ten Parts of Yang Funei Taijiquan.  Tai Chi, April 2003, Volume 27, Number 2, pp. 48- 51.
Part 4.  The Complete Yang Style Taijiquan System.  Tai Chi, June 2003, Vol. 27, No. 3, pp 44.-47.  


The Origins of Tai Chi Chuan.   Qi Journal.  


Orthodox Chinese Taiji Quan.    An 88 minutes videotape that teaches the standard Yang style, Beijing version, short form of Tai Chi Chuan.  Includes footage of other styles and push hands.  


Photographs of Yang Style Masters


Practical Use of Tai Chi Chuan.   By Yang Sau Chung.  


Professor Cheng.  The Offical Website of Professor Cheng Man-Ch'ing  Painting, calligraphy, medicine, poetry and tai chi chuan.  


Push Hands (Tui Shou) in Tai Chi Chuan.  Links, bibliography, quotes, notes.


Qi (Chi) Energy Cultivation - Breathing Exercises


Qigong (Chi Kung) Energy Cultivation
    Bibliography, Links, Resources, Lessons, Quotes, Research. 


Recommended Books, Videos, and DVDs on Yang Style Taijiquan Long Form


Relaxation (Sung) in Taijiquan  Looseness, alertness, relaxed, poised, sunk.  


Ripening Peaches:  Daoist Studies and Practices.  Taoist scriptures, bibliography, Quanzhen Daoism, Neidan, gardening, tea, history, qigong/daoyin, readings, etc. 


Saber (Dao, Broadsword) - Yang Style   Bibliography, links, resources, quotes, notes.


Short Form, Simplified 24 Movements, Tai Chi Chuan, Yang Style, Beijing Standard. By Michael P. Garofalo.   List of the movements (.html and .pdf), links, bibliography, quotations, lessons, and notes.  


Silk Reeling (Chan Ssu Jin):  Links, bibliography, quotes, notes. 


Song of the Thirteen Postures.
   Translated by Benjamin Lo. 


Song of the Thirteen Postures.   12Kb..  Translated by Louis Swaim.  


Staff Weapon - Yang Style   Bibliography, links, quotes, notes.  [I practice the Eight Immortals Cane Form, Part 1, Yang Style, created by Master Jesse Tsao of San Diego, California). 


Standard Simplified Taijiquan 24 Form.  Yang Style, 24 movements, created in 1956.  Bibliography, links, resources; list of the 24 movement names in English, Chinese, French, German and Spanish, with citations for movement names; detailed descriptions of each movement with line illustrations; quotes, notes, performance times, online videos, sections for learning, and tips for learning.  Peking (Bejing) orthodox short 24 form T'ai Chi Ch'uan.  Research by Michael P. Garofalo.  Published by Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Red Bluff, California:  Webpage URL:  http://www.egreenway.com/taichichuan/short.htm.


Stillness in Movement: The Practice of Tai Chi Chuan.  Featuring Master Fong Ha.  108 postures.  120 minute VHS instructional videotape.  Vision Arts Video, 1996.  ISBN:  0965365107.  Produced by Sanford Rosenberg.  VSCL. 


Strength Training: Taijiquan, Qigong, Kung Fu and Yoga   


Subject Index to the Cloud Hands (Taijiquan and Qigong) Website   


Sung (Relaxation) in Taijiquan   Looseness, openness, alerness, relaxed, sunk.  


Sun Lu Tang's Internal Martial Arts: Baguazhang, Xingyiquan, Taijiquan, and Qigong.  Bibliography, Links, Quotes, Resources, Instructions.   


Sun Style of T'ai Chi Ch'uan: Standard Competition 73 Movements Form.  Research by Michael P. Garofalo, M.S..  This webpage includes an introduction, information on the history of the Sun Taijiquan forms, a detailed bibliography, extensive links, references to video resources, a large collection of quotations about Sun Taijiquan, recommendations on the best media resources on the topic, and suggestions for learning the 73 competition Sun Taijiquan form.  A detailed comparative list of the names of each of the 73 movements is provided, with source references, and the movement names are given in English, Chinese, Chinese characters, French, German, and Spanish.  This webpage includes detailed descriptions of each of the 73 movements with black and white illustrations for each movement sequence along with commentary and comparisons.  Many additional nomenclature lists and section study charts in the PDF format, photographs and graphics are also provided - over 1.3 MB of information.  This webpage is the most detailed and complete document on the subject of the Sun Taijiquan Competition 73 Form available on the Internet.  This document was published by  Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Red Bluff, California, 2009.   URL: http://www.egreenway.com/taichichuan/sun73.htm.


Swaim, Louis - An Interview


Sword (Jian) - Yang Style:  Links, bibliography, quotes, notes. 


Sword Techniques:  Taijiquan Broadsword (Saber, Ox Tail Broadsword, Dao)   Chen Taijiquan Dao, Yang Taijiquan Dao, Wushu Competition Dao


"Suppleness and Strength in Taijiquan."  By Wu, Ta-yeh.  Internal Arts, Vol. 3, No. 6, November, 1988, p. 8-9.  


T'ai ChiT'ai Chi: The International Magazine of T'ai Chi Ch'uan.  Wayfarer Publications.  Editor/Publisher: Marvin Smalheiser.  Numerous articles on Yang style Taijiquan.  


T'ai Chi According to the I Ching: Embodying the Principles of the Book of Changes.  By Stuart Alve Olson.  Rochester, Vermont, Inner Traditions International Ltd., 2001.  224 pages.   ISBN:  0892819448.  The movements of the first section of the Yang long form related to the I Ching. VSCL.   


The Tai Chi Book: Beginning and Enjoying a Lifetime of PracticeBy Robert Chuckrow, Ph.D..  Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts, YMAA Publication Center, c 1998.   209 pages. ISBN: 1886969647.  An excellent general introduction to Taiji from the Yang style perspective.  VSCL. 


T'ai Chi Ch'uan and the I Ching.  By Liu, Da.  Harper Collins, 1972.  ISBN: 0060616679.


T'ai Chi Ch'uan Classics   Bibliography, links, resources, quotes, notes.  


T'ai Chi Ch'aun Classics.   Interpretations by Lee N. Scheele based upon the translations of the Classics found in: The Essence of T'ai Chi Ch'uan: The Literary Tradition. This webapge is mirrored elsewhere.  


T'ai Chi Ch'uan For Health and Self-Defense: Philosophy and Practice.  By T.T. Liang.  New York, Vintage Books, 1977.  137 pages.  ISBN: 0394724615.   T.T. Liang studied with over 15 teachers, including Cheng Man-ch'ing.  VSCL. 


Tai Chi Chuan Fotoboek     By Marc Heyvaert from Belgium.  


Tai Chi Chuan Journal


Tai Chi Chuan's Internal Secrets
.   By Doc Fai Wong and Jane Hallander.  Burbank, California, Unique Publications Inc., 1991.  124 pages.  ISBN: 0865681473.  Photos and brief descriptions of the 108 movement Yang style long form.  Brief, but informative, presentations about stances, chi kung, breathing, practice tips, applications, and push hands.  A good book for Yang style beginners to purchase, to supplement direct instruction.  I really like the black and white photo sequence of the form.  VSCL. 


Tai Chi Chuan Martial Applications Advanced Yang Style.  By Dr. Wang, Jwing Ming.  Edited by Alan Doughall.  Jamaica Plain, MA, YMAA Publications, 2nd Edition, 1996.  363 pages.  ISBN: 1886969442.


T'ai Chi Ch'uan: Salud y Longevidad   


T'ai Chi Ch'uan, Sword, Saber, Staff and Dispersing-Hands Combined.  By Chen Yen-lin.  Originally published in China in 1932.  Based on writings compiled by Wu Ho-ching who was a scholar and student of Yang Lu-chan (1799 - 1872).  These written works were obtained by Chen Yen-lin (1906 - ?) from the famous Yang Cheng-fu (1883-1936).   This book was very popular in China, helped spread the Yang style Tai Chi Chuan widely, and opened the doors to publishing about internal arts forms.  This book has been compiled and translated by Stuart Alve Olson and published by Dragon Door Publications as the Chen Kung Series, Volumes 1 -5.  


T'ai Chi Ch'uan Ta Wen: Questions and Answers on T'ai Chi Ch'uan.  By Chen Wei-Ming. Translated by Benjamin Pan Jeng Lo and Robert W. Smith.  Berkeley, California, North Atlantic Books, 1986.  61 pages.  ISBN:  0938190679.


T'ai Chi Ch'uan Training Speed.   By Peter Lim Tian Tek.  18Kb.


Tai-Chi-Ch'uan: Yang Long Form.   By Xue Dejun and Bob Klein.  Artistic Video, 1994.  ASIN:1892198088.  VHS and DVD.  


Tai Chi Classics   Links, bibliography, index.  


T'ai Chi Classics.  By Waysun Liao.  New translations of three essential texts of T'ai Chi Ch'uan with commentary and practical instruction by Waysun Liao.  Illustrated by the author.  Boston, Shambhala, 1990. 210 pages.  ISBN: 087773531X.  VSCL. 


Tai Chi Connections: Advancing Your Tai Chi Experience.  By John Loupos. Boston, MA, YMAA Publication Center, 2005.  Index, 194 pages. 
ISBN: 1594390320.  VSCL. 


Tai Chi de Style Yang
.   Mate Lee Shiu-Pak.  French language website.  


Tai Chi Dim Mak
.   By Erle Montague.  20Kb.   Dim Mak Point Strike Applications.  


Tai Chi for Health   By Tai-Chi-Xin.  See Also:  Tai Chi 24 Forms 


T'ai Chi For Health - Yang Long Form with Terence Dunn.  VHS videotape, 120 minutes.  Healing Arts, 1990.  Produced and created by Terence Dunn.  
ISBN: 6301866584.  An excellent instructional videotape!  Fine studio photography with clear front view and with a side view insert.  This very
reasonably priced videotape is, in my opinion, the best in the genre and should be a first choice for beginners.  


T'ai Chi Magazine.  A Wayfarer Publication.   A fine quarterly magazine.  Lots of articles about Yang style Taijiquan.  


Tai Chi Secrets of the Ancient Masters.   Translated by Yang Jwing-ming.   Edited by Yang Jwing-ming and James C. O'Leary.   Selected readings with commentary on Tai Chi Treasures.   Jamaica Plain, MA, YMAA Publications, 1999.  128 pages.  ISBN: 188696971X.  VSCL. 


Tai Chi Secrets of the Yang Style.  Translated with commentary by Yang Jwing-ming.  Translations and commentary on Chinese Classics.   Boston, MA, YMAA Publications, 2001.  Index, glossary, 192 pages.   ISBN:  1886969094.  A translation of 49 documents by Yang, Ban-Hou (1837-1892) and by a few other Yang family members.  VSCL.     


T'ai Chi Sensing- Hands.  A Complete Guide to T'ai Chi T'ui-Shou Training from Original Yang Family Records.  Translation and commentary by Stuart Alve Olson.  Multi-Media Books, Division of CFW Enterprises, 1999. Distributed by Unique Publications, Burbank, CA.  First Edition.  280 pages.  ISBN: 1892515156.  Part of the Cehn Kung (Yearning K. Chen) T'ai Chi Series. 


Tai Chi World of Erle Montaigue


Taiji Sword, Classical Yang Style: The Complete Form, Qigong and Applications.  By Yang, Jwing-Ming.  Edited by James C. O'Leary.  Boston, Mass., YMAA Publications, 1999.  Index, glossary, list of form postures, 205 pages.  ISBN: 1886969744.  Chinese Swordplay   VSCL. 


Tai-Chi: The "Supreme Ultimate" Exercise for Health, Sport and Self-Defense.  By Cheng Man-ch'ing and Robert W. Smith.  New York, Prentice Hall, 1967.  110 pages. ISBN: 0804805601. 


Tai Chi Theory and Martial Power: Advanced Yang Style Tai Chi.  By Dr. Yang, Jwing-Ming.  Jamaica Plain, Mass., YMAA Publication Center, 1996.  Second Edition.  Glossary, index, 268 pages.  MGC.  ISBN: 1886969434.  


Tai Chi Touchstones: Yang Family Secret Transmissions.  Compiled and translated by Douglas Wile.  Brooklyn, New York, Sweet Chi Press, 8th Edition, 1983.  159 pages.  ISBN: 091205901X.   


Tai Chi Yang Style  Members can access artiles, animations of the form, news, links, a BBS, and school information.  


Taijiquan, Classical Yang Style - The Complete Form and Qigong.  By Yang, Jwing-Ming.  Boston, MA, YMAA Publications Center, 1999.  Index, glossary, 333 pages, 562 illustrations.  ISBN:188696968X.  There is also an instructional  videotape and DVD to supplement this book.  The DVD contains the complete form, gigong, details instructions for each movement, and 13 postures.  Performed by Dr. Yang, Jwing-Ming and Robert Was.  240 Minutes, DVD9-NTSC, 2003.  DVD ISBN: 0940871645.  His version of the form differs somewhat from the "standard" version, particularly on left side versions of movements.  VSCL. 


The Taijiquan Classics: An Annotated Translation.   By Barbara Davis.  Includes a commentary by Chen Wei-ming.  San Franscisco, North Atlantic Books, 2004. Index, bibliography, notes, 200 pages.  ISBN: 1556434316.   VSCL. 


Taiji Sword (Jian):  Links, bibliography, quotes, notes.  


Taijiquan.  By Li Deyin.  London, Singing Dragon, 2004, 2008.  In English.  402 pages.  ISBN: 9781848190047, 1848190042.  Includes a complimentary DVD.  Includes descriptions, with photographs, of the 81 Yang Taijiquan form, Simplified 24 Taijiquan, Competition 42 Taijiquan, Competition 42 Taiji Sword, and the 32 Taiji Sword.  The Yang long form (81 Steps) includes photographs of Li Yulin performing the Yang long form in 1931.  Li Yulin and Li Jinglin, under the supervision of Yang Chengfu, were preparing a book on the subject later published under the title "Textbook of Taijiquan."  The 81 form is described in detail in this new book by Li Deyin. 


Taijiquan Classics   Bibliography, links, quotes, notes.  


Taijiquan Classics: In Li I-yu's Handwritten Manuals.   Edited and translated by Peter Lim Tian Tek.   This is an outstanding collection of Tai Chi Classics.


Taijiquan - Grand Ultimate Fist  History of Taijiquan forms.  


Taijiquan Tutelage of Palo Alto  Classes, annual workshops, and instructional videotapes for learning the long form.  


Talks on the Practice of Tai Chi Chuan.   By Yang Chen Fu. 


Talks on the Practice of Tai Chi Chuan.   By Yang Cheng-Fu. 


Taijiquan Shiyong Fa (Application Methods of Taijiquan).  By Yang, Chengfu. 1931.  Reprint edition, Taibei: Zhenshanmei Chubanshe, 1983.  Known to have been compiled and edited by one of Yang's noted students, Dong Yingjie (Tung Ying-Chieh).  Includes photographs of Yang Cheng-Fu, Chen Wei-ming, and Tung Ying-chieh.


Taijiquan Theory of Dr. Yang, Jwing-Ming: The Root of Taijiquan.  By Yang Jwing-Ming.  Boston, Massachusetts, 2003.  References, glossary, index, 270 pages.  ISBN: 0940871432.  VSCL.  


The Tao of Tai-Chi Chuan:  Way to Rejuvenation.   By Jou, Tsung Hwa.   Edited by Shoshana Shapiro.  Warwick, New York, Tai Chi Foundation, 1980.  263 pages.  First Edition.  ISBN: 0804813574.  Excellent textbook.  A Third Edition is now available.  The Yang Family Tai Chi Chuan is covered on pp. 42-69.  A list of the 105 movements is provided.  Detailed line drawings of the movements are included.  The drawings are tracings of 
Yang Chen-Fu (1883-1936) also called Yang Chao-Chin.  


Tchoung Ta-Tchen's Dual Form of Yang Style


"The Teaching of Yang Shou-Zhong."  By Paul Lam.  T'ai Chi, Vol. 25, No. 4, August 2001, pp. 30-32.  Yang Shou-Zhong was the eldest son of Yang Cheng-fu.  


Teaching Tai Chi Chuan.   Links, bibliography, quotes and notes.  


The Teachings of Master T. T. Liang: Imagination Becomes Reality.  A Complete Guide to the 150 Posture Solo Form.  Compiled by Stuart Alve Olson.  287 pages.  Minnesota, Dragon Door Publications, 1986, 1992.  Second Edition.  ISBN: 0938045091.  Hundreds of detailed pictures of the form, including some interesting multi-exposure photographs of Mr. Olson doing the long form.  The is an outstanding guide to the Yang Style form.  The explanations are superior and the photography outstanding.  One of my favorite guides to Yang style Tai Chi Chuan.  VSCL. 


The Teachings of Yang Zhenming (1909-1985), also known as Yeung Sau Chung.  


Ten Essentials of Tai Chi Theory.   By Yang, Cheng-fu.  Translated by Louis Swaim.  


Ten Guiding Points of Tai Chi Chuan    


Thank You Very Much: David Tobey of Seattle.  I appreciate your suggestions and comments about this webpage.   


There Are No Secrets: Professor Cheng Man-ch'ing and His Tai Chi Chuan.  By Wolfe Lowenthal, 1939-.  Berkeley, California, North Atlantic Books, 1991.  142 pages. ISBN: 1556431120.  Wolfe Lowenthal was a student of Cheng Man-ch'ing.  VSCL. 


Thirteen Postures of Taijiquan.   Bibliography, links, notes, charts, quotes.   8 Gates and 5 Steps of T'ai Chi Ch'uan.   By Michael P. Garofalo.  65Kb+.  


32 Standard Sword Form - Yang Style  Bibliography, Links, Quotes, Notes. 


Traditional Yang Style Tai Chi.  Instructional VHS videotape by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye.  132 minutes, two videotapes.  Website: Jiang's Tai Chi Videos.   


Traditional Yang Style Taiji Sword.  This instructional videotape features Yang Zhen Dou, 4th generation Yang family, son of Yang Cheng-fu, and Yang Jun, 6th generation, grandson of Yang Zhen Duo.  There is now an "English Version" of this VHS videotape, 60 minutes, from United States Wushu Academy, 7521 Arlington Blvd., Falls Church, VA 22042, Phone: 703-698-8182.  


Traditional Yang Style Taijiquan. This instructional videotape features Yang Zhen Dou, 4th generation Yang family, son of Yang Cheng-fu, and Yang Jun, 6th generation, grandson of Yang Zhen Duo.  This tree volume videotape is narrated in Chinese.  A booklet with the English translation is available.  Available from Taste of China, 111-S Shirley Street, Winchester, VA 22601, 540-667-7595.  There is now an "English Version" of this VHS videotape, 6 hours, from United States Wushu Academy, 7521 Arlington Blvd., Falls Church, VA 22042, Phone: 703-698-8182.  They also offer instructional videotapes on the Traditional Yang Style Taiji Saber, and Traditional Yang Style Taiji Sword, both by Master Yang Zhen Dou.  


"Traditional Yang Style Training."  An interview with Yang Fukui.  T'ai Chi, Vol. 24, No. 5, October, 2000, pp. 17- 24.  


A Tribute to Yang Shaozhong (1910-1985).   By Daniel K. Wong.  T'ai Chi: The International Magazine of T'ai Chi Ch'uan, Vol. 27, No. 6, December, 2003, pp. 30-38.  Yang Shaozhong was the oldest son of Grandmaster Yang Chengfu.  By age 14 he was working as his father's assistant.  He worked for the government and in private practice in many provinces in China.  He had one book published, Usage and Variations of Taijiquan with Illustrated Demonstration by Two, Hong Kong, 1962.  


"The True History of the Yang Style."   Inteview with Fu Zhongwen by Marvin Smalheiser.  T'ai Chi, Vol. 25, No. 6, December, 2001, pp. 18-20.   


Tsao, Jesse - Taijiquan Master.  San Diego, CA.  He offers numerous videotapes, and one of his instructional videotapes is on the Yang style long form 108.  


Tui Shou (Push Hands) in Tai Chi Chuan.  Links, bibliography, quotes, notes.   


Tung Ying-Chieh (Dong Yingjie) (1890-1964)  Noted student of Yang, Cheng-Fu.  Tung wrote the 1931 book on "Application Methods of Taijiquan" for Yang, Cheng-Fu.  


Two Person Practice Sets (Da Lu) - Yang Style


Ultimate Guide to Tai Chi.  (The Best of Kung-Fu Magazine).  Edited by John R.  Little and Curtis F. Wong.  Chicago, IL, Contemporary Books, 2000.  301 pages. ISBN: 0809228335.   Includes a photographic study of all the postures in the Yang 108 long form, pp. 33-115.  Many very interesting and informative articles.  VSCL. 


Valley Spirit Center.  Red Bluff, California


Valley Spirit Tai Chi Chuan Journal.  A journal with reflections, notes, suggestions, references, questions and answers, links and quotations.  By Michael P. Garofalo.  


Valley Spirit Tai Chi Chuan Club.  Red Bluff, California.  Instructor:  Michael P. Garofalo.


VSCL = Valley Spirit Center Library, Red Bluff, California

 

 

 

 

 

 

Video Clips Online of the Long Yang Style Tai Chi Chuan Form 


The last time I checked on this was back in July 2008.  I am sure UTube now has many more videos online about the Yang Style of Taijiquan for you to use. 

 

Traditional Yang Family Style Taijiquan.  Demonstrated by Master Yang Jun, 6th Generation, Yang Family:

Yang Taiji, Master Yang Jun, 1st Part, 103 Form.  UTube, 4:57 minutes.  Yang Jun really looks quite young in this video. 

Yang Taiji, Master Yang Jun, 2nd Part, 103 Form.  UTube, 10:52 minutes. 

Yang Taiji, Master Yang Jun, 3rd Part, 103 Form.  UTube, 9:05 minutes. 

 

 

81 Step Yang Style Taiji.  Ms. Zong Weijie performs 81-step Yang-style of Taijiquan in Beijing. Extracted from a Chinese educational video.  Zong Weijie is a lecturer at Beijing University of Physical Education, and several times China's National champion in Taijiquan and Taiji sword.


Yang Style Tai Chi Chuan, Long Form, Section 1 and 2, Master Jesse Tsao, 6 minutes, I


Yang Style Tai Chi Chuan, Long Form, Section 2 and 3, Master Jesse Tsao, 5 minutes, II  


Yang Style Tai Chi Chuan, Long Form, Master Terry Dunn, 50 minutes.  Very grainy and distorted
pixillation.  Best to purchase  a new videotape!  I've got to believe that this long clip is a copyright infringement. 


Yang Style Tai Chi Chuan, Long Form, Master John Loupos, 2 minutes and 32 seconds 


Yang Style Tai Chi Chuan, Long Form, Section One, 2 minutes and 15 seconds.


Yang Style Tai Chi Chuan, Short 24 Form, Vinz, 7 minutes and 21 seconds  


Yang Style Traditional Long Form T'ai Chi Ch'uan; As Taught by Master T. T. Liang.  By Gordon Muir.  Berkeley, California, Blue Snake Books, 2008.  225 pages.  ISBN: 9781583942215.  VSCL. 


Traditional Fast Form in Yang Style, 5 Minutes 


Yang Style Tai Chi Chuan, 8 Movement Short Form, Manuel Joseph En El Lago, Peru, 3 minutes and 45 seconds  


Video: Yang Style Tai Chi Chuan, Long Form, Section 1 and 2, Master Jesse Tsao, 6 Minutes, I 


Yang Style Tai Chi Chuan, Long Form, Section One, 2 minutes and 15 seconds.


Yang Tai Chi Long Form

 

 

 


Videotapes on Yang Style Tai Chi Chuan  


Videotapes on Yang Style Tai Chi Chuan.  Wayfarer Catalog.  Distributes videotapes by Lu Gui Rong, Terry Dunn, Doc-Fai Wong, Fong Ha, Jiang Jian-ye, Ye Xiao Long,


Xin Qi Shen Do.   Andrew Dale, Seattle, WA    


"Wang Haijun on Eight Methods of Training Jin," by David Gaffney, T'ai Chi: The International Magazine of T'ai Chi Ch'uan: Vol. 29, No. 4, August, 2005, pp. 5-10.  Translation by Davidine Diaw-Voon Sim. 


Wayfarer Publications    Los Angeles, California.  Numerous books, DVDs and videotapes on Yang Style Taiji.  


Way of the Short Staff.  By Michael P. Garofalo, M.S.  A comprehensive guide to the practice of the short staff, cane, jo, walking stick, gun, zhang, whip staff, 13 Hands Staff, and related wood short staff weapons.  A detailed and annotated guide, bibliography, lists of links, resources, instructional media, online videos, and lessons.   Includes use of the short staff and cane in martial arts, self-defense, walking and hiking.  Separate sections on Aikido Jo, Cane, Taijiquan cane and staff, Jodo, exercises with a short staff, selected quotations, techniques, selecting and purchasing a short staff, tips and suggestions, and a long section on the lore, legends, and magick of the short staff.  Includes "Shifu Miao Zhang Points the Way."  Published by Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Red Bluff, California.  Updated on a regular basis since October, 2008.  Filesize: 275 Kb.  Related to Mike's popular webpage on the Staff.


Where Can I Purchase These Books and Videotapes?   


William C. C. Chen     Tai Chi Master in New York.   


Wikipedia - Tai Chi Chuan Yang Style


Words of Experience by Tung Ying Chieh   10Kb.  


Wu Ji - Standing Meditation


Wong, Doc-Fai Martial Arts Centers - Plum Blossom International Federation   


Xin Qi Shen Dojo   Seattle, WA.  Excellent resouces and information. 


Yang Cheng-Fu (July 7, 1883 - March 3, 1936)  Grandson of Yang Lu-Chan.  Father of Yang Zheng-Duo. 

 

 

 

 

Yang, Cheng-Fu       (Yang Chao-Chin)

 

     



 

     

 

1883   He was born on July 7, 1883.  His father was Yang Jiang-Hou (1839-1917).  He was the grandson of Yang Lu-Chan (1799-1872).

1888   He had an older brother, Yang Chao-Hsiung (1862-1930), who also taught Yang Taijiquan.  

1903   He began the study of Yang Taijiquan.  He was not interested in martial arts in his youth.  Although his father was alive, older brother,          and other advanced Yang students, and they all contributed to his growing knowledge of the Yang style of martial arts, Yang Chengfu was largely self-taught according to many commentators.  

1908   His adult personality is often described as friendly, kind, openhearted, and gentle.  He was very popular as a teacher, an avoided hurting his students and challengers.  He was a large man - over 230 pounds.  

1911   His son was born, Yang Zhen-Ming (1911-1985)

1921   "Illustrated Explanation of Taijiquan Forms," by Xu, Long Hou is published.  Xu was a student of Yang Cheng-Fu's father.  This book helped popularize Yang style Taijiquan.  

1922   His second son was born, Yang Zhen-Ji (1922-)

1923   His main disciple and senior instructor was Fu Zhong-Wen (1903-1994)

1925   "The Art of Taijiquan," by Yang Chengfu  is published in Shanghai.  It was compiled and edited by his disciple, the editor and writer Chen Wei-ming (1881-1958).   

1926   His third son was born, Yang Zhen-Duo  (1926-). 

1930   "The Complete Principles and Theory of Taijiquan," published in Shanghai by Yang Chengfu.  Cheng Man-Chi'ng (1901-1975) begins studying with Yang Chengfu.  

1931   "Applications of Taijiquan," is published in Shanghai.  Known to have been compiled and edited by one of Yang's noted students, Dong Yingjie (Tung Ying-Chieh), 1890-1964.  

1933   "Taijiquan Exercise and Application," published in Shanghai.

1934   "The Essence and Applications of Taijiquan," is published.  Known to have been compiled and edited by the noted author, Professor Cheng Man-Chi'ng

1936   Yang Chenfu died on March 3, 1936.  He was 53 years of age.  


Biographical Sources:   One, Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, Seven

 

 


"Yang Cheng-Fu's Early and Later Postures."   By Wu Ta-yeh and Wu Teng Shu-hsien.  T'ai Chi, Vol. 24, No. 6, December, 2001, pp. 14-15.  

 

     



1918

 

Yang Cheng Fu Shi Tai Ji Quan.   By Yang Zeng Ji.  ISBN: 7536319843.  


Yang Cheng Fu - The Story of a Cotton Thread   


Yang Cheng-Fu's Taijiquan Long Form 108/88


Yang Cheng- Fu's Ten Principles of Tai Chi Chuan  


Yang Family Tai Chi Chuan.  Instructional videotape, 65 minutes, Part 1.  Featuring Lu Gui Rong.  Volume 37   


Yang Family T'ai Chi Ch'uan Curriculum  16Kb


Yang Family Tai Chi Chuan Traditional Form.  Instruction DVD, 190 minutes, performed by Master Yang Jun.  Three parts:  Overview of 10 Principles of Taijiquan, demonstration of the entire form, detailed explanation of each of the movements.  ALL instructions are presented in English.  Includes some applications of the movements in the form.  $80.00.  Available from the Yang Family Tai Chi Chuan International Organization in Seattle, WA.  Review by Wujimon.  The material covered is the same as the 3 day workshop by Master Yang Jun that I attended in Portland in 2005.  VSCL. 


Yang Family Tai Chi 108 Form with Grandmaster Doc-Fai Wong.  ALC Productions, P. O. Box 320532, San Francisco, CA 94132.  Produced in 1997.  VHS, 55 Minutes.  Website: Doc-Fai Wong Martial Arts Centers - Plum Blossom International Federation.  Grandmaster Wong has a Ph.D., O.M.D., authored two books, made a dozen instructional videotapes, and is the President of the Plum Blossom International Federation of Choy Li Fut and Tai Chi Chuan.  Grandmaster Wong was a student of Hu Yuen Chou, a disciple of Yang Cheng-Fu.  This videotape features a spirited performance of the form by Grandmaster Wong shown from three different views; but this is not an instructional videotape.  


Yang Family Tai Chi Chuan International Organization  Headquaters in Seattle, WA.  Led by Masters Yang Zhen Duo and Yang Jun.  YangChen Fu Tai Chi style.  Association, ranking system, schools, seminars, products, journal, news, information.  They offer a new DVD by Yang Jun on the traditional long hand form.  Products include DVD, book, swords and supplies, and T-shirts.  Some short articles are offered.  This organization
hosts many Yang Family hand form and saber form workshops around the USA and abroad.  I enjoyed the Yang Jun workshop in Portland a few years ago. 


Yang Family T'ai Chi Ch'uan Lineage


Yang Family Tai Chi of New York City   


Yang Family Taiji Quan  Lineage chart. 


Yang Family Taijiquan - A History.   LongFei Newsletter.  By Richard Watson.      


Yang Family Taiji Quan: The Hidden Tradition.   By Scott Rodell. 
 


Yang Family Taijiquan Traditional Long Form 108 Movements.   By Michael P. Garofalo.  200 Kb+.  List of movements, links, bibliography, quotations.  HTML and PDF versions of movement lists.  


Yang Family, Yang Style.  By Sam Masich.   16Kb.  


Yang, Jwing-Ming Ph.D., (1945-).  Noted master, teacher and author.  He has published many books, videotapes, and DVD's about the Yang style of Taijiquan.  Boston, MA.   


Yang Long Form.  Tai Chi for Health.  By Terry Dunn, a student of Abraham Liu.  120 minute VHS instructional videotape.  


Yang Lu-Chan (1799-1872)  Founder of Yang Style Taijiquan.  Grandfather of Yang Cheng-Fu.  AKA: Yang Fu Quai.    Biography 1    Biography 2    Biography 3


Yang Shao-Hou (1862-1930)   Yang Cheng-Fu's older brother.  


Yang's Martial Arts Association.  Yang, Jwing-Ming (1945-) Ph.D.  Boston, MA.  


Yang Style History   26Kb


Yang Style Internal Martial Arts: Taijiquan, Sword, Saber, Staff


Yang Style Long Form 108 List of Movements  


Yang Style Saber


Yang Style Short Form   Simplified 24 Movements, Tai Chi Chuan, Yang Style, Beijing Standard.   List of the movements (.html and .pdf), links, bibliography, quotations, and notes.  


Yang Style Staff


Yang Style Sword


Yang Short Taijiquan Form, 48 Movements, Competition Standard


Yang Short Taijiquan Form, 24 Movements, Bejing Standard Simplified, P.E. Class Form


Yang Short Taijiquan Form, 37 Movements, Professor Cheng Man-Chi'ng


Yang's Ten Important Points   Yang Cheng-fu (1883-1936)    


Yang Style Tai Chi.  Videotape featuring Fu Zhong Wen and his grandson.  Chinese narration.  TC Media.


Yang Style Tai Chi Chuan.   By Yang Jwing-Ming.  Hollywood, CA, Unique Publications, 1982.  207 pages.  The standard form in 113 movements.  Includes material on pushing hands, applications, and the narrow blade sword routine.  Hundreds of photographs with detailed descriptions.  ISBN: 086568023X.  VSCL.   


Yang Style Tai Chi Chuan.  Presented by Master Ye Xiao Long.   Instructional VHS videotape.   Part 1, 70 minutes.  Part 2, 61 minutes.  


Yang Style Tai Chi Chuan and Its Applications
.   By Yang, Jwing-Ming.  VHS videotape.  Boston, YMAA Publications, 1995.  ASIN: 0940871181.   Applications for postures  in the 24, 48 and 108 forms.  


Yang Style T'ai Chi Ch'uan: Bibliography, Links, Quotes, Resources, Notes, Movement Lists.  Researched by Michael P. Garofalo.  Published at the Cloud Hands website. 
Provides a list of the movements of the standard 108 long form of the Yang style divided into five sections for teaching (.html and .pdf versions available).  Includes a detailed bibliography and links list.  Provides a list comparing the Yang Long Form 108 to 85 postures sequence.   Includes links to video clips online.  Some information on Yang Cheng Fu (1883-1936). 
 

Yang Style Tai Chi Chuan Essays.   By Peter Lim.  


Yang Style Tai Chi Homepage   Master Lee Shiu-Pak.  


Yang Style Taijiquan.  By Yang Zhenduo.  Written by the third son of Yang Cheng-fu.  Beijing, Morning Glory Publishers, 1996.  600 photographs, 291 pages. ISBN: 7505404814.  VSCL.    


Yang-style Taiji Quan.  DVD instructional videotapes.  Volumes I, II, III.  Explained by Yang Zhengduo, the 4th-generation exponent of Yang style Taijiquan.  Includes some demonstrations by Yang Jun.  Explanation in Mandarin by Yang Zhengduo, Enlish language voice translation by Christopher Pei.  Made in China.  Volume I, 115 minutes in color.   Volume II, 125 minutes, in color.  Volume III, 97 minutes in color.  Detailed explanations by sections.  Complete demonstrations of the 103 Forms and 49 Forms routines on each volume.  Distributed by: Source 1Source 2Source 3, Source 4, Source 5.  Yang Zhengduo is the son of Yang Cheng-Fu; and Yang Jun is the grandson of Yang Zheng-duo.  VSCL. 

 

 


Yang Style Taijiquan.  Traditional Yang Style Slow Form.  Reference video for the Taijiquan Tutelage of Palo Alto.  Performed by Michael Chan.  Instructional VHS. 


Yang Style Taijiquan - The Best Books, Videos and DVDs


Yang Style Tai Chi Chuan Essays.   By Peter Lim.  


Yang Style Tai-Chi Chuan, 108 Movements.  By Master Yu Cheng Hsiang.  VHS instructional videotape, 60 minutes.  


Yang Style T'ai Chi Ch'uan Videos  24, 44 and 88 Form videos.  You need Real Player.  


Yang Style Taijiquan   


Yang Style Swordsmanship:  Links, bibliography, quotes, notes.  


Yang Tai Chi Classical Routine.  Instructional DVD, 3 discs, 337 minutes.  English and Chinese soundtrack with subtitles.  "In this set of DVDs, they give a thorough illustration of the characteristics and practicing methods of The Yang Style Tai Chi, including a demonstration and illustration of the traditional 103-Form and the simplified 49-Form Yang Tai Chi Chuan.  This set of DVDs is a good teaching material because each of movement, hand technique and body shape are detailedly demonstrated and explained during the course of practice, so it makes even the beginners who have never heard of Tai Chi Chuan can learn it well in a very short time. Furthermore, it is also useful for those who want to improve their practicing level.  They are taught and demonstrated by Master Yang Zhen Duo, the well-known Fourth Offspring of The Yang Style Tai Chi Chuan." Available from Tai Chi Depot, Information


Yang Tai Chi - Little Mountain Tai Chi Club  Informative website with artilces on history, principles, classic advice, bibliography, links, and DVD/Video lists.  


Yang Taijiquan.  Instructional VHS videotapes by Lu Gui Rong of Shanghai.  Part of the China's Living Treasures Series.  Volume 37, Part 1, Yang Training Basics, VHS, 56 minutes.  Volume 38, Part 2, Yang Long Form, First Section, VHS, 61 minutes. Volume 39, Yang Long Form, Second Section, VHS, 81 minutes.  Volume 40, Part 3, Yang Long Form, Third Section, VHS 80 minutes.  Available from Wayfarer Publications.   


YMAA, Yang's Martial Arts Association
.  Yang, Jwing-Ming (1945-) Ph.D.  Boston, MA.  


Yongnian Taiji Martial Arts Center.   Ted Knecht.  This group has produced videotapes on the Yang Long 108 form, Yang sword, Yang broadsword, and qigong forms.  Links, resources, and articles.  

 

 

Green Way Journal by Michael P. Garofalo

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recommendations by Michael P. Garofalo

Learning the Yang Cheng-Fu Long Hand Form Style (94/108) of T'ai Chi Ch'uan.  
What Books, Videos, DVDs, or VCDs are Useful?  


When I began to study Yang style T'ai Chi Ch'uan in 1986, there were relatively few choices in books or videotapes to supplement direct instruction from my first Taijiquan teacher, Sensei Frank McGourick, Whittier, California.  Now, in 2009, there are scores of options, in multiple media formats.  There are many excellent instructional videotapes, VCDs, and DVDs available, with detailed instructions and informative live presentations by noted masters to supplement your direct instruction.  In addition, there are a few good books and videotapes to help you to get started on your Taijiquan learning journey if a live instructor is not available to you.  Everyone can now begin the study of this popular mind-body art to achieve better health, fitness, coordination, relaxation, self-defense awareness, balance, concentration, and inner calmness.  

I frequently get email from people asking me to recommend books or videotapes, VCDs, or DVDs for them to use to study Yang style Taijiquan.  This is a difficult question for me to answer since, as a retired person, I cannot afford to purchase most of the books, videos or DVDs listed in this bibliography.  (I welcome authors or publishers sending me a copy to review.  I also greatly appreciate those readers who send me gifts.).  I also welcome suggestions from my readers about this topic.  


Based upon the limited number of copies I have reviewed, 
I recommend the following:

1.  If you do have an instructor teaching you the Yang style taijiquan long form , then consider purchasing:


The Teachings of Master T. T. Liang: Imagination Becomes Reality.  A Complete Guide to the 150 Posture Solo Form.  Compiled by Stuart Alve Olson.  287 pages.  Minnesota, Dragon Door Publications, 1986, 1992.  Second Edition.  ISBN: 0938045091.  Hundreds of detailed pictures of the form, including some interesting multi-exposure photographs of Mr. Olson doing the long form.  This is an outstanding guide to the Yang Style form.  The explanations are superior and the photography outstanding.  One of my favorite guides to Yang style T'ai Chi Ch'uan.  $32.50 retail.  This book is very useful even if you don't have an instructor.  


2.  If you do not have an instructor, and want to begin your study at home, alone, then consider purchasing both books and DVD/videos: 


a.  Mastering Yang Style Taijiquan.  Bu Fu Zongwen (1903-1994).  Translated by Louis Swaim.  Berkeley, California, North Atlantic Books, 1999.  Glossary, bibliography, 226 pages.  Translations of many Tai Chi classics are included.  A list of the 85 movement long form and detailed notes and descriptions of each movement are provided.  251 movement analysis illustrations.  Over 76 of the illustrations are traced and drawn from photographs of Yang Cheng-Fu.  Detailed descriptions of the long form, pp. 26-162.  Push hands information. Yang Tai Chi essentials.  ISBN: 1556433182.  I have found this to be an excellent book!  This book was first published in 1963 in China as "Yang Shi Taijiquan".  An informative
introduction and good translation by Louis Swaim.  $16.95 retail.    


b.  Yang-style Taiji Quan.  DVD instructional videotapes.  Volumes I, II, III.  Explained by Yang Zhengduo, the 4th-generation exponent of Yang style Taijiquan.  Includes some demonstrations by Yang Jun.  Explanation in Mandarin by Yang Zhengduo, Enlish language voice translation by Christopher Pei.  Made in China.  Volume I, 115 minutes in color.   Volume II, 125 minutes, in color.  Volume III, 97 minutes in color.  Detailed explanations by sections.  Complete demonstrations of the 103 Forms and 49 Forms routines on each volume.  Distributed by: Source 1Source 2Source 3, Source 4, Source 5.  Three Volumes for $45.00.  Yang Zhengduo is the son of Yang Cheng-Fu; and Yang Jun is the grandson of Yang Zhengduo.  


c. 
Yang Style Taijiquan.  By Yang Zhenduo.  Written by the third son of Yang Cheng-fu.  Beijing, Morning Glory Publishers, 1996.  600 photographs, 291 pages.  ISBN: 7505404814.  Edited by Yu Zhenquan.  Retail for $10.95.  


d.  T'ai Chi For Health - Yang Long Form with Terence Dunn.  VHS videotape, and DVD formats.  120 minutes.  Healing Arts, 1990.  Produced and created by Terence Dunn.  DVD ASIN: B0002ZDR80.   VHS ISBN: 6301866584.  An excellent instructional videotape!  Fine studio photography with a clear front view and with a side view insert.  This very reasonably priced videotape is, in my opinion, the best for the price in the genre and should 
be a first choice for beginners.  Good, clear, understandable  instructions.  $18.00 retail for the new DVD and/or video, and for under $10 new and used.    

e.  Yang Family Tai Chi Chuan Traditional Form.  Instruction DVD, 190 minutes, performed by Master Yang Jun.  Three parts:  Overview of 10 Principles of Taijiquan, demonstration of the entire form, detailed explanation of each of the movements.  ALL instructions are presented in English.  Includes some applications of the movements in the form.  $80.00.  Available from the Yang Family Tai Chi Chuan International Organization in Seattle, WA.  Review by Wujimon.  The material covered is the same as the 3 day workshop by Master Yang Jun that I attended in Portland in 2005.  This instructional DVD costs about $80.00 retail. 

 

3.  After you get serious about your Yang style Taijiquan practice:


a.  Tai Chi Secrets of the Yang Style by Yang, Jwing-Ming, Ph.D..  Dr. Yang has also published numerous books, videotapes and DVDs about the 
Yang style hand and sword forms. 
YMAA, Yang's Martial Arts Association
.  Boston, MA.   Those looking for a comprehensive distance learning program will find Grandmaster Yang Jwing-Ming's publications to be an excellent resource.  


b.  The Taijiquan Classics: An Annotated Translation.   By Barbara Davis.  Includes a commentary by Chen Wei-ming.  San Franscisco, North Atlantic Books, 2004.  Index, bibliography, notes, 200 pages.  ISBN: 1556434316.   There are also other good books on the Taijiquan Classics to consider.


c. 
Cheng Man-ch'ing (1901-1975)  Consider his books and those by his many students.  Although Professor Cheng practiced a short version of the Yang Taijiquan form, the explanations of the principles of Taijiquan and the clear emphasis on the health benefits and joys of practicing are very valuable to all new students.  A good example of his influence is found in: The Tai Chi Book: Beginning and Enjoying a Lifetime of Practice, by Robert Chuckrow, 

d.  Take a look at the many books and instructional media listed in the bibliographies I have provided on the Yang Style and Taijiquan in general. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yang Style Taijiquan Long Form

List of the 108 Movements

Created by Yang Cheng-Fu (1883-1936)


Aside from personal practice and instructions from teachers, I did a detailed comparison and study of the Yang style long hand form as presented in different books, videotapes, DVDs, and VCDs.  I also compared and charted the differences between the 108 movement Yang long hand form and the 88 movement Yang long hand form.  


How to list and count the number of movements in the traditional Yang Family style of T'ai Chi Ch'uan long form varies from author to author.  It all depends upon how you group the movements.  For example, Grasping the Sparrow's Tail can be listed as one movement with four parts (Ward Off, Roll Back, Press, and Push) or as four separate movements.  Sometimes, the first time Grasping the Sparrow's Tail is listed it is broken into four numbered movements, but any time it appears later it is then listed as one movement with four parts.  Is Cloud Hands one movement, or three movements?  Is Step Back and Repulse the Monkey one movement or two movements (left side then right side) repeated two times each?  Is Turn, Backfist, Parry and Punch one movement or four movements?  Are Brush Knee and Twist Step to the right and Brush Knee and Twist Step to the left two movements, or are they one movement?  


Yang style Taijiquan, as a internal martial art (Nei Jia Quan), is grounded in a group of core practice principles: relaxation (Song),  circular movements, martial applications, rooting (Gen), moving from the waist (Yao), chi and springy (Jin) energies, softness (Rou), fluidity and expansiveness, good timing and coordination, fullness and emptiness, deep and coordinated breathing, becoming calm and quiet (Jing), mind/intent (Yi) leading bodily movements, body mechanics and stance requirements, and other principles found in the Taiji Classics.  


Many students will benefit from having a list of the sequence of the movements in the section of the T'ai Chi Ch'uan 108 long hand form they are studying and practicing.  The following list of the 108 movement Yang style long form is little more than a list to jog the memory.  You are welcome to use the lists that I provide for my students in the Valley Spirit Taijiquan Club.  These lists are in HTML and PDF formats.  You can print the PDF documents, post your notes on the documents, and use them as handy lists during the learning process.  I hope you will find the lists useful, and I 
welcome your comments and suggestions.

 

Definitions and Keys:  

R = Right leg, right arm, or right side
L =  Left leg, left arm or left side

Leg Weighting = e.g., 30R/70L means that 30% of the body weight is in the right leg and 70% of the body weight is in the left leg.  The weighting refers to the final stage of any listed movement.  RL =  Right leg, right foot.  LL = Left leg, left foot

Index to the lists for all the movements.

 

Directional Instructions

 

Key Clock Hour
Direction
Compass
Direction A

     
N 12 12:00 o'clock North - Front Side of Body
NE 1 1:30 o'clock Northeast
E 3 3:00 o'clock East - Right Side of Body
SE 4 4:30 o'clock Southeast
S 6 6:00 o'clock South - Back Side of Body
SW 7 7:30 o'clock Southwest
W 9 9:00 o'clock West - Left Side of Body
NW 10 10:30 o'clock Northwest

 

Some might find other diagrams for the four cardinal directions more useful for their Taijiquan workout environment and situation, and these can be found on my webpage which describes the alternatives for this nomenclature more completely.  There are directional keys for all four cardinal directions on that webpage.  Some adjustments in the directions for facing and moving must, of course, be modified depending upon the space available in your practice area.  

When the center of your chest and navel face the 12 o'clock position or north, your right or east side faces 3 o'clock, your back or south side faces 6 o'clock, and your left or west side faces 9 o'clock.   

This method can be used to describe a posture like Single Whip (Chest W 9, R Arm N 12, L Arm and Palm W 9, Face and Eyes W 9).  Or, Diagonal Slant Flying (Chest NW 10, Right Arm NE 1, Left Arm SW 7, Face and Eyes NE 1).   Remember that "NE 1" is a key, or abbreviation for facing true NE to the 1:30 position; or "SW 7" is the abbreviation or key for facing true SW to the 7:30 position.  

In the description below, the direction key gives the bearing of the center of the chest and the navel at the end of the particular movement.  

 

  

Yang Style Long Form Tai Chi Chuan

First Section

   

# Direction
Key
Name of Movement Description, Comments
                   
1, N 12  Preparation Standing Wu Chi, Compose oneself, Head up, Arms at sides, Feet together, Stay relaxed and loose (Sung)
          
2. N 12 Step Out, Raise and Lower Hands Step to the left, 50R/50L, Stand tall, Raise and lower the arms, Sink, 
Bend knees, Sung - Loosen, Open, Relax
     
3. N 12  Ward-Off Left Block R forearm, step to the left side, L arm Ward-off (Peng) to the L side with L forearm, R hand down, 30R/70L for legs.
    
4. E 3  Grasping the Sparrow's Tail Step to the right side, Face E 3, Ward-off (Peng) R rounded forearm, 70R/30L.  Double Ward Off both hands, chest high.
Roll Back (Lu), 40R/60L
Press (Ji), 70R/30L
Push (An), 70R/30L
         
5. W 9 Single Whip  Circle Arms counter-clockwise 180 to L, then circle back to R, Beak R fist, Press L palm to W9 chest high, Step W9 to 30R/70L, Right arm to NE1.5
      
6. NW 10  Raise Hands, Shoulder Stroke Lift hands, 30R/70L, R hand high, R Heel, Step R foot to N12, Shoulder stroke (Kao), L palm to R bicep, 70R/30L, Lean shoulder towards N12
                
7. W 9 White Crane Spreads Its Wings 95/5L, Face W9, R hand up high, L hand at hip, L foot forward with toe down.
        
8. W 9 Brush Left Knee, Right Palm Strike Raise R hand to head, Step L leg, Brush L knee, Palm strike R hand to W9, 30R/70L
          
9. W 9 Play the Pi Pa  (Lute, Guitar) Half step R foot, 90R/10L, L fingers at face level, R fingers at waist level, fingers up, L heel stance
            
10. W 9 Brush Left Knee, Right Palm Strike #8
       
11.  W 9 Brush Right Knee, Left Palm Strike Raise L hand to head, Pivot on L heel, Step R leg, Brush R knee, Palm strike with L hand, 70R/30L
      
12. W 9 Brush Left Knee, Right Palm Strike #8
        
13. W 9 Play the Pi Pa #9
        
14.  W 9 Brush Left Knee, Right Palm Strike #8
           
15. W 9 Step Forward, Intercept, Parry 
and Punch
Turn left, Torso S 6, Pivot-twist on L heel, 40R/60L.  Twist step forward R leg, Block-intercept with R forearm, Twist on R heel, Sink, Move R fist to R hip, 60R/40L.  Step forward with left foot to W 9, Parry-control with L hand, Punch with R fist forward - chest high, L hand to R forearm, 30R/70L
           
16. W 9 Apparent Withdraw then Push Pull arms in, shift weight back and down, cross block hands in & out,
Push up and out with both palms (An) to W9, 30R/70L.
          
17. N 12  Cross Hands Hands circle down and up.  Turn, take Horse Stance.  Cross hands at chest with R hand in front, 50R/50L, Facing N12
         

 

I also offer a one page, print only version, PDF format handout  (48Kb) of the Yang Style Taijiquan Long Form, First Section (Movements 1 - 17).
Used by Valley Spirit Taijiquan students.

List of Movements, First Second, Yang Long 108  Movements 1-18.  
Number and title of the movement list.  A 1 page, print only version in PDF format (16Kb).  

Index to the lists for all the movements.

 

 

 

 

 

Yang Style Long Form Taijiquan

Second Section, Part I

 

# Direction
Facing
Name of Movement Comments
                
18. SE 4 Embrace the Tiger, 
Return to the Mountain
Move arms NE to NW then pivot to SE, Brush R knee, 
L palm strike, R hand at waist, 70R/30L
19. SE 4 Grasping the Sparrow's Tail
Roll Back (Lu), 40R/60L, #4
Press (Ji), 70R/30L, #4
Push (An), 70R/30L, #4 
20. W 9 Fist Under Elbow Circle arms 180 to NW then back, Twist L foot,
Short step L foot twist, Step wide R leg to N,
Turn W, Step W with left heel, 80R/20L,
L hand high, R fist under L elbow
21. W 9 Step Back, Repulse Monkey - Right Face W 9, Move back to E 3, Step back L leg to E 3,
L arm moves back to E 3, R arm moves to W9
R palm forward , 20R/80L
22. W 9 Step Back, Repulse Monkey - Left Face W, Move back to E, Step back R leg E 3,
R arm moves back to E3, L arm move to W9
L palm forward, 80R/20L

23.

W 9

Step Back, Repulse Monkey - Right

#21
24. NE 1 Diagonal Slant Flying
Step to NE with R foot, R hand high and palm up to NE,
L hand back and low, 70R/30L
25. N 12 Raise Hands, Shoulder Stroke Lift Hands, R hand high, Step forward R heel,
30R/70L, #6
Shoulder stroke (Kao), L palm at R shoulder,
70R/30L, #6, Shoulder to N12, Face to W9
26. W 9 White Crane Spreads Its Wings 90R/10L, Face W, R hand up high, #7
27. W 9 Brush Left Knee and Push Step L leg, Brush L knee, Palm strike R hand W, #8
28. W 9 Needle at Sea Bottom 90R/10L, L toe stance, R hand down, L hand chest
29. N 12 Fan Through the Back 30R/70L, L and forward from shoulder to NW,
R hand back at face, Look to NW
30. E 3 Turn, Chop with Fist Turn 90 to E3, Chop down with R fist,
R fist to waist, L palm strike, 70R/30L
31.  E 3 Step Forward, Parry and Punch #15, but reverse direction from #15
32. NE 1 Ward-Off Left Step forward with L leg to NE 1.5,
Ward-off L side with L forearm, 30R/70L, #4
33. E 3 Grasping the Sparrow's Tail Double Ward Off Hands to E 3 side, Hands at chest high,
Roll back, Press, and Push to E3, #4
34.  W 9 Single Whip Circle hands R to L then back, Step L leg, R hand claw
L palm strike to W9, R claw hand to NE, 30R/70L, #5
35. N 12 Wave Hands Like Clouds Wide spread hands R high, Step W with R foot
Move hands L to R with R hand high, Step
Reverse hands move from E 3 Right to L, Step to W 9
Reverse hands move L to R, Step to W 9
Reverse hands move R to L, Step
Palms face body
Move from E 3 to W 9
36. W 9 Single Whip Hands L to R circle, beak R hand,
Palm strike L hand to 9,  #5
37. W 9 High Pat on Horse R hand at face palm down, 
L hand at waist palm up,
L toe stance, 90R/10L

 

I also offer a one page, print only version, PDF format handout  (53KB) of the Yang Style Taijiquan Long Form, Second Section, Part I,  (Movements 18 - 37).  Used by the Valley Spirit Taijiquan students.

List of Movements, Second Section, Yang Long 108  Movements 18-55.  Number and title of the movement list.  A 1 page, print only version in PDF format (16Kb).  

Index to the lists for all the movements.

Comparison of 108 Long Yang with 88 Long Yang - Chart

 

 

 

 

 

Yang Style Long Form Taijiquan

Second Section, Part II

 

# Direction
Facing
Name of Movement Comments
                  
38. SW 7 Kick with Right Toe Step to SW 7.5 with L foot (Separate Feet), Circle hands,
Separate hands, Kick with R toe to NW 10.5,
0R/100L
39. NW 10 Kick with Left Toe Step to NW with R foot, Circle hands, Separate hands, 
Kick with L toe to SW, 100R/0L
40. SE 4 Turn, Kick with Left Sole Pivot on R foot 180 to L, Separate hands, 
Kick with L sole to NE, 100R/0L
41. E 3 Brush Left Knee, Push Step L leg, Brush L knee, 
Palm strike with R hand, # 8
42. E 3 Brush Right Knee, Push Step R leg, Brush R knee, 
Palm strike with L hand, #11
43. SE 4 Step Up, Punch Downward Step L leg, Sink down, 
Punch low with R fist, 30R/70L
44. W 9 Turn, Chop with Fist Pivot 135 to R, R back fist down,
L palm strike, #30
45. W 9 Step Forward, Parry, Punch Advance step R foot, Pivot Twist on R foot, 
Parry, Step forward with L foot,
Punch with R fist, 30R/70L, #15
 
46. SW 7 Kick with Right Sole Circle hands, Separate hands,
Kick with R sole to NW
47. W 9 Strike Tiger, Left Side Step to S with L leg, Face S, 
Intercept with R hand, L fist high,
R fist at chest, 20R/80L, 
Body leans to S
48. W 9 Strike Tiger, Right Side Turn to R 90, Step to N with R leg, 
Intercept with L hand, R fist high,
L fist at chest, Face N, 80R/20L, 
Body Leans to N
49. SW 7 Kick with Right Sole Circle hands, Separate hands,
Kick NW with R sole, 0R/100L
50. NW 10 Strike Opponent's Ears with Fists Pivot on L foot, Raise R knee, 
Step with R foot to NW,  
Box ears with both fists, 70R/30L
51. NW 10 Kick with Left Sole Circle hands, Separate hands,
Kick SW with L sole, Arms wide,
100R/0L, #40
52.  S 6 Pivot Around, Kick with Right Sole 270 pivot on L foot, Circle hands,
Separate hands, Kick with R sole to W
53. W 9
Step Forward, Deflect, Parry 
and Punch
 
#15
54. W 9 Apparent Withdraw and Push #16

55. 

N 12

Cross Hands

#17


I also offer a one page, print only version, PDF format handout  (48KB) of the Yang Style Taijiquan Long Form, Second Section, Part II,  (Movements 38 - 55), for my Valley Spirit Taijiquan students.

List of Movements, Second Section, Yang Long 108  Movements 18-55.  Number and title of the movement list.  Used by Valley Spirit Taijiquan students.  A 1 page, print only version in PDF format (16Kb).  

Index to the lists for all the movements.

 

 

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

Yang Style Long Form Taijiquan

Third Section, Part I

 

 

# Direction
Facing
Name of Movement Comments
                   
56. SE 4 Embrace Tiger, Return to Mountain #18
57. SE 4 Grasping the Sparrow's Tail #19
58. N 12 Horizontal Single Whip #5, 30R/70L
59. E 3 Parting the Wild Horse's Mane - Right R Leg forward, Split, R Hand high, 
70R/30L
60. E 3 Parting the Wild Horse's Mane - Left L Leg forward, Split, L Hand high,
30R/70L
61. E 3 Parting the Wild Horse's Mane - Right #59
62. N 12 Ward-Off Left #3
63. E 3 Grasping the Sparrow's Tail #4: Ward-Off Right, Roll Back, Press, Push
 
64. W 9 Single Whip #5
65. NE 1 Fair Lady Works the Shuttles - Left Pivot 120, Turn to L side, L hand high 
block palm out, R palm strike, 40R/60L
66. NW 10 Fair Lady Works the Shuttles - Right Pivot 270, Turn to R side, R hand high
block palm out, R palm strike, 40R/60L
67. SW 7 Fair Lady Works the Shuttles - Left Pivot 90, Turn to L side, L hand high
block palm out, R palm strike, 40R/60L
#65
68. SE 4 Fair Lady Works the Shuttles - Right Pivot 270, Turn to R side, R hand high
block palm out, L palm strike, 60R/40L,
#66
69. N 12 Ward-Off Left #3
70.  E 3 Grasping the Sparrow's Tail #4: Ward-Off Right, Roll Back, Press, Push
71. W 9 Single Whip #5
72. N 12 Wave Hands Like Clouds #35, Step W, Move from E to W
73. W 9 Single Whip #5
74. W 9 Snake Creeps Down Squat down on R leg, snake down L leg
with L hand
75. W 9 Golden Rooster Stands on Left Leg R hand over raised R knee, L palm down
at waist
76. W 9 Golden Rooster Stands on Right Leg L hand over raised L knee, R palm down
at waist
77. W 9 Step Back, Repulse Monkey - Right #21, move W to E, step back with L leg,
R palm forward
78. W 9 Step Back, Repulse Monkey - Left #22, move W to E, step back with R leg,
L palm forward
79. W 9 Step Back, Repulse Monkey - Right #77
80. NE 1 Diagonal Slant Flying #24
81. N 12 Raise Hands, Shoulder Stroke #25
82..  W 9 White Crane Spreads Its Wings #26

I also offer a one page, print only version, PDF format handout  (65Kb) of the Yang Style Taijiquan Long Form, Third Section, Part I, (Movements 56 - 82), Used by the Valley Spirit Taijiquan students.

List of Movements, Third Section, Yang Long 108   Movements 56-108.  Number and title of movement list.  A 1 page, print only version in PDF format (26Kb).  

Index to the lists for all the movements.

Comparison of 108 Long Yang with 88 Long Yang - Chart

 

What Yang Style Taijiquan Books or Videos or DVDs Do I Recommend?

 

 

 

 

 

Yang Style Long Form Taijiquan

Third Section, Part II

 

# Direction
Facing
Name of Movement Comments
                       
83. W 9 Brush Left Knee and Push #27
84. W 9 Needle at Sea Bottom #28
85. N 12 Fan Through the Back #29, R Palm to W, L Palm to E, Sepatate Hands
86. E 3 White Snake Darts Out Tongue Pivot, Back Fist, R palm strike upward,
L palm up at waist, 70R/30L
87. E 3 Step Forward, Parry and Punch #31
88. NE 1 Ward-Off Left #32
89. E 3 Grasping the Sparrow's Tail #33:  Double Ward-Off, Roll back, Press, Push
90. W 9 Single Whip #34, R hand in hook gesture
 
91. N 12 Wave Hands Like Clouds #35, Move from E to W
92. W 9 Single Whip #36
93. W 9 High Pat on Horse #37
94. W 9 Plain Crossed Hands Step out L leg, 30R/70L, L hand jab palm
up, R palm in armpit
95. E 3 Turn and Cross Kick Pivot 180 to R, Cross hands, Separate
hands, Kick R heel to E
96. SE 4 Step up, Punch Downward #43
97.  NE 1 Ward-Off Left #32
98. E 3 Grasping the Sparrow's Tail #33: Double Ward-Off, Roll Back, Press, Push
99. W 9 Single Whip #34
100. W 9 Snake Creeps Down #74, Squat down on R leg
101. W 9 Step up to Seven Stars R leg steps forward, 10R/90L, Crossed
fists in front, R fist outside
102. W 9 Step Back to Tiger R leg steps back, 90R/10L, R hand high,
L hand at waist
103. W 9 Lotus Kick Pivot 360, R leg Lotus Kick, Slap R foot
104. W 9 Draw the Bow, Shoot the Tiger L to R waist pivot, 70R/30L bow, 
L fist straight forward, R fist at head
105. W 9 Step Forward, Deflect, Parry, Punch #15
106. W 9 Apparent Withdraw then Push #16
107. N 12 Cross Hands #17
108. N 12 Conclusion #1

I also offer a one page, print only version, PDF format handout  (63Kb) of the Yang Style Taijiquan Long Form, Third Section, Part II, (Movements 83 - 108).  Used by the Valley Spirit Taijiquan students.

List of Movements, Third Section, Yang Long 108   Movements 56-108.  Number and title of movement list.  A 1 page, print only version in PDF format (26Kb).  

Index to the lists for all the movements.

 

 

 

 

Quotations

Yang Style Taijiquan 108 Long Form

 

Yang Cheng-fu's Ten Important Points

"1.) Head upright to let the shen [spirit of vitality] rise to the top of the head. Don't use li [external strength], or the neck will be stiff and the ch'i [vital life energy] and blood cannot flow through. It is necessary to have a natural and lively feeling. If the spirit cannot reach the headtop, it cannot raise.

2.) Sink the chest and pluck up the back. The chest is depressed naturally inward so that the ch'i can sink to the tan-t'ien [field of elixir]. Don't expand the chest: the ch'i gets stuck there and the body becomes top-heavy. The heel will be too light and can be uprooted. Pluck up the back and the ch'i sticks to the back; depress the chest and you can pluck up the back. Then you can discharge force through the spine. You will be a peerless boxer.

3.) Sung [Relax] the waist. The waist is the commander of the whole body. If you can sung the waist, then the two legs will have power and the lower part will be firm and stable. Substantial and insubstantial change, and this is based on the turning of the waist. It is said "the source of the postures lies in the waist. If you cannot get power, seek the defect in the legs and waist."

4.) Differentiate between insubstantial and substantial. This is the first principle in T'ai Chi Ch'uan. If the weight of the whole body is resting on the right leg, then the right leg is substantial and the left leg is insubstantial, and vice versa. When you can separate substantial and insubstantial, you can turn lightly without using strength. If you cannot separate, the step is heavy and slow. The stance is not firm and can be easily thrown of balance.

5.) Sink the shoulders and drop the elbows. The shoulders will be completely relaxed and open. If you cannot relax and sink, the two shoulders will be raised up and tense. The ch'i will follow them up and the whole body cannot get power. "Drop the elbows" means the elbows go down and relax. If the elbows raise, the shoulders are not able to sink and you cannot discharge people far. The discharge will then be close to the broken force of the external schools.

6.) Use the mind instead of force. The T'ai Chi Ch'uan Classics say, "all of this means use I [mind-intent] and not li." In practicing T'ai Chi Ch'uan the whole body relaxes. Don't let one ounce of force remain in the blood vessels, bones, and ligaments to tie yourself up. Then you can be agile and able to change. You will be able to turn freely and easily. Doubting this, how can you increase your power?

The body has meridians like the ground has ditches and trenches. If not obstructed the water can flow. If the meridian is not closed, the ch'i goes through. If the whole body has hard force and it fills up the meridians, the ch'i and the blood stop and the turning is not smooth and agile. Just pull one hair and the whole body is off-balance. If you use I, and not li, then the I goes to a place in the body and the ch'i follows it. The ch'i and the blood circulate. If you do this every day and never stop, after a long time you will have nei chin [real internal strength]. The T'ai Chi Ch'uan Classics say, "when you are extremely soft, you become extremely hard and strong." Someone who has extremely good T'ai Chi Ch'uan kung fu has arms like iron wrapped with cotton and the weight is very heavy. As for the external schools, when they use li, they reveal li. When they don't use li, they are too light and floating. There chin is external and locked together. The li of the external schools is easily led and moved, and not too be esteemed.

7.) Coordinate the upper and lower parts of the body. The T'ai Chi Ch'uan Classics say "the motion should be rooted in the feet, released through the legs, controlled by the waist and manifested through the fingers." Everything acts simultaneously. When the hand, waist and foot move together, the eyes follow. If one part doesn't follow, the whole body is disordered.

8.) Harmonize the internal and external. In the practice of T'ai Chi Ch'uan the main thing is the shen. Therefore it is said "the spirit is the commander and the body is subordinate." If you can raise the spirit, then the movements will naturally be agile. The postures are not beyond insubstantial and substantial, opening and closing. That which is called open means not only the hands and feet are open, but the mind is also open. That which is called closed means not only the hands and feet are closed, but the mind is also closed. When you can make the inside and outside become one, then it becomes complete.

9.) Move with continuity. As to the external schools, their chin is the Latter Heaven brute chin. Therefore it is finite. There are connections and breaks. During the breaks the old force is exhausted and the new force has not yet been born. At these moments it is very easy for others to take advantage. T'ai Chi Ch'uan uses I and not li. From beginning to end it is continuous and not broken. It is circular and again resumes. It revolves and has no limits. The original Classics say it is "like a great river rolling on unceasingly." and that the circulation of the chin is "drawing silk from a cocoon " They all talk about being connected together.

10.) Move with tranquility [Seek stillness in movement]. The external schools assume jumping about is good and they use all their energy. That is why after practice everyone pants. T'ai Chi Ch'uan uses stillness to control movement. Although one moves, there is also stillness. Therefore in practicing the form, slower is better. If it is slow, the inhalation and exhalation are long and deep and the ch'i sinks to the tan-t'ien. Naturally there is no injurious practice such as engorgement of the blood vessels. The learner should be careful to comprehend it. Then you will get the real meaning."

-  By Yang Cheng-fu (1883 - 1936) as researched by Lee N. Scheele

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

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This webpage was first posted online on February 1, 2001.

This webpage was last modified or updated on November 15, 2014. 

 

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